I May See Road Blocks, But God See's Opportunities.

I May See Road Blocks, But God See's Opportunities.

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Sometimes we hit a dead end. We run into a sign that tells us to turn around, to take the detour ahead or merge because the lanes about to end. These signs and actions are difficult to accept. In fact, I often wish I could plow right through them. I wish I could blink and traffic would be clear, with an open road in sight. But, life doesn't work like that. We don't always get everything we want, because it's NOT always what we truly need.

I think God works this way. Sometimes we want to rush ahead, we want to get that internship, the "perfect" job, that "perfect" relationship or opportunity placed before us. We want smooth sailing ahead. With nothing in our path to stop us. But, more often than not, God has other plans. He knows what you need. He knows your deepest desires and hopes, your wants and your needs. He takes into consideration everything and everyone around you, and sometimes this means that God throws up the 'roadblock' ahead sign.

You see, He places these roadblocks in our lives to challenge us and change us. He takes you down a detour, he asks you to merge into another lane because He sees opportunities that we our to blind to see. He knows who we are to our very cores and He see's roadblocks as opportunities for us to further grow in Him. He see's our lives and our desires, but more importantly, He is able to see our needs.

So, the next time you hit a roadblock, don't look for an opportunity to plow ahead. But rather, sit in this new adventure. Take the detour and you might just experience something remarkable. Follow Gods plan and you might just be given an opportunity that you never thought possible.

Rest in the now and move ahead. But, don't be afraid of the roadblocks when they occur, because sometimes the roadblocks we see as inconveniences, are Gods greatest opportunities.

Cover Image Credit: Stocksnap

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So, You Want To Be A Nurse?

You're going to find that nursing isn't really about the medicine or the assessments. Being a nurse is so much more than anything that you can learn in school. Textbooks can't teach you compassion and no amount of lecture time will teach you what it truly means to be a nurse.

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To the college freshman who just decided on nursing,

I know why you want to be a nurse.

Nurses are important. Nursing seems fun and exciting, and you don't think you'll ever be bored. The media glorifies navy blue scrubs and stethoscopes draped around your neck, and you can't go anywhere without hearing about the guaranteed job placement. You passed AP biology and can name every single bone in the human body. Blood, urine, feces, salvia -- you can handle all of it with a straight face. So, you think that's what being a nurse is all about, right? Wrong.

You can search but you won't find the true meaning of becoming a nurse until you are in the depths of nursing school and the only thing getting you through is knowing that in a few months, you'll be able to sign the letters "BSN" after your name...

You can know every nursing intervention, but you won't find the true meaning of nursing until you sit beside an elderly patient and know that nothing in this world can save her, and all there's left for you to do is hold her hand and keep her comfortable until she dies.

You'll hear that one of our biggest jobs is being an advocate for our patients, but you won't understand until one day, in the middle of your routine physical assessment, you find the hidden, multi-colored bruises on the 3-year-old that won't even look you in the eyes. Your heart will drop to your feet and you'll swear that you will not sleep until you know that he is safe.

You'll learn that we love people when they're vulnerable, but you won't learn that until you have to give a bed bath to the middle-aged man who just had a stroke and can't bathe himself. You'll try to hide how awkward you feel because you're young enough to be his child, but as you try to make him feel as comfortable as possible, you'll learn more about dignity at that moment than some people learn in an entire lifetime.

Every class will teach you about empathy, but you won't truly feel empathy until you have to care for your first prisoner in the hospital. The guards surrounding his room will scare the life out of you, and you'll spend your day knowing that he could've raped, murdered, or hurt people. But, you'll walk into that room, put your fears aside, and remind yourself that he is a human being still, and it's your job to care, regardless of what he did.

Each nurse you meet will beam with pride when they tell you that we've won "Most Trusted Profession" for seventeen years in a row, but you won't feel that trustworthy. In fact, you're going to feel like you know nothing sometimes. But when you have to hold the sobbing, single mother who just received a positive breast cancer diagnosis, you'll feel it. Amid her sobs of wondering what she will do with her kids and how she's ever going to pay for treatment, she will look at you like you have all of the answers that she needs, and you'll learn why we've won that award so many times.

You'll read on Facebook about the nurses who forget to eat and pee during their 12-hour shifts and swear that you won't forget about those things. But one day you'll leave the hospital after an entire shift of trying to get your dying patient to eat anything and you'll realize that you haven't had food since 6:30 A.M. and you, too, will be one of those nurses who put everything else above themselves.

Too often we think of nursing as the medicine and the procedures and the IV pumps. We think of the shots and the bedpans and the baths. We think all the lab values and the blood levels that we have to memorize. We think it's all about the organs and the diseases. We think of the hospitals and the weekends and the holidays that we have to miss.

But, you're going to find that nursing isn't really about the medicine or the assessments. Being a nurse is so much more than anything that you can learn in school. Textbooks can't teach you compassion, and no amount of lecture time will teach you what it truly means to be a nurse.

So, you think you want to be a nurse?

Go for it. Study. Cry. Learn everything. Stay up late. Miss out on things. Give it absolutely everything that you have.

Because I promise you that the decision to dedicate your life to saving others is worth every sleepless night, failed test, or bad day that you're going to encounter during these next four years. Just keep holding on.

Sincerely,

The nursing student with just one year left.

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Being Homesick Is Normal For College Students, Don't Feel Bad About It

I've heard enough horror stories to know that being home is honestly an escape from negative people, negative feelings, and even just being homesick.

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When you first move into the residence halls and get all settled, you will feel really excited about being in a new place. If you're anything like me though, it was a really hard adjustment. Many students enjoy the freedom they've wanted for so long, no more checking in, going out drinking, parties, etc. However, for others who are homebodies, this is a really hard change to handle.

It's also a struggle to overcome what seems the norm for a college student, which is taking advantage of your freedom from adult supervision by staying out until the early morning hours. However, I have to say that that norm isn't really the typical college life because there are a lot of different kinds of students — one of them is the homebody.

Basically, what I mean by this is someone who prefers to be home with their family and dogs; just being back in their hometown make them happy. For me, I go home every other weekend, which would be more frequent if it wasn't because of my work schedule. I don't really want to party. To be honest, I have never felt like I'm missing out on anything by being this way.

Sure, I still like spending time with friends and even drinking occasionally, but nothing beats being at home. To me, being home is the best — watching tv in my own room, sleeping in my own bed and eating homemade meals cooked by my mom have no equal. I look forward to my mom making my favorite meal when I am home. Also, I get to watch the Chicago Blackhawks with my entire family as my mom gets frustrated and yells at the TV as if the players can hear her tell them what exactly they need to do.

Being home shouldn't be something to shame college students for. People need to understand that this is where they escape to and relax. College is extremely stressful, considering you're pretty much thrown into adulthood — we're all being repeatedly punched with new responsibilities throughout the four years. Home is a safe place for so many students because this is where they can go for love and support when life gets them down.

Leaving behind your own space to share a small space with someone you've most likely never met can be really stressful. I've heard enough horror stories to know that being home is an escape from negative people, negative feelings, and even just being homesick. So, stop judging someone who foregoes parties and opts out to heading home instead.

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