Yes, I Love Wearing Nike Shorts And T-Shirts, But I Also Like Looking Nice

Yes, I Love Wearing Nike Shorts And T-Shirts, But I Also Like Looking Nice

Six out of the seven days in the week, you will find me wearing comfortable clothing, rather than stylish!
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Every typical college girl has her favorite pair of Nike shorts, favorite comfort colors t-shirts and most definitely a favorite pair of leggings.

I would say, about 70 percent of the time – you could find me in either shorts or leggings and ALWAYS a Comfort Colors T-Shirt. I live to be comfortable in my clothing throughout my day. Although I strive to be comfortable, that doesn’t go to say that I don’t enjoy looking nice!

With the trends these days changing like the weather, it is hard – for me at least, to know what colors I need to be purchasing, the latest sandals or sneaker, let alone the latest earrings and necklace to match the pinstripe on my skirt.

In fact, I do actually enjoy looking nice. Occasionally, I do love to curl my hair and use my fancy teasing brush because everyone knows it is only used for special occasions. I do enjoy doing my makeup, with minimal timing and skills exerted. I do enjoy choosing which shirt to wear with my lavender cardigan and which pair of Jacks look best with my Lilly. It is SO fun!

Some girls live to look nice each and every day – and HUGE PROPS to them. I could never do it, simply because I strive to be comfortable.

In order to be comfortable in my clothing choices, I have chosen to be comfortable in my own skin. Six days out of the week, you can find me in a pair of leggings, a t-shirt, hair in a bun and no makeup. It’s just my vibe and I live for it!

Now, if this article finds you alarmed – do not fret. I guarantee you can find me in any T.J. Maxx or Marshalls nearest you – attempting to look trendy. Stay tuned for more details and feel free to send any suggestions my way!

Cover Image Credit: Lauren Fowler

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5 Things No One Told Me About My New Cartilage Piercing

I got my first cartilage piercing a week ago, but nothing really prepared me for the experience.
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A week ago, I got my very first cartilage piercing – a double helix.

I've wanted a cartilage piercing since forever, so the prospect of finally getting it made me feel so giddy that I couldn't help but grin from ear to ear when the piercer finally put the gun to my ear (and if you feel weirded out just by reading that, imagine how the piercer must have felt watching close-up).

Prior to the commitment, I had done a ton of research about cartilage piercings, but nothing quite prepared me for what an adjustment the first week would be.

1. Getting pierced feels like being pinched.

Everyone's level of pain tolerance is different, but for me, on a scale of one to 10, a double helix piercing is a three – so like a hard pinch. My ear was pierced at Claire's with a piercing gun.

Of course, like other people who've researched piercings, I was worried that the gun would shatter my ear because of posts like these and pictures like this (viewer direction advised). So while I still think a needle piercing would be the better option for cartilage piercings, that option was not available for me. Thankfully, the piercer at my local Claire's is experienced and has a few of her own, which helped ease my nerves.

If you would like to get a needle cartilage piercing, contact your local tattoo shops and ask if they have it. However, be warned, tattoo shop piercings can be on the pricier end.

At Claire's alone, the cheapest stud is $18.99, and since I had two holes pierced, the price racked up to $37.98 – and this is all before taxes. Luckily, there happened to be a sale that day which helped nudge the total cost down a bit.

2. The after-care routine can get painful.

I wasn't allowed to wash my ear for the first 48 hours unless it was with the given sterile saline solution. My usual cleaning routine is: loosen earrings, wet cotton ball with the solution, gently wipe and clean, then twist earrings and slightly tighten at the end – and repeat, three times a day.

Everything seemed to be going well until two days later when my ear reacted by turning red sending prickles of pain up my cartilage. I suspected an infection, but then my friend advised me to soak my ears with the solution using a puffy cotton ball. This trick somehow worked to bring down swelling entirely and eliminate the pain in the following hours. As it turned out, I hadn't been thorough enough in my routine. The solution is not just meant to help wipe the piercing clean but to soak into the ear holes.

I've gotten used to the new routine but sleep, on the other hand...

3. Sleep is a struggle.

The first day wasn't so bad besides the expected redness, but the first night was when the real struggle began. I couldn't sleep on my left side without squishing my ear, so I propped another pillow next to the left side of my head so that, if I did turn in the middle of the night, it would stop me from landing on my ear.

I woke up was an hour later in pain because I had shoved the pillow aside in my sleep and landed splat on my pierced ear. So for the second try, I propped a bunched up T-shirt under my head and a small pillow on my left, so that if I do turn left while asleep, the side of my head will just barely rest against the small pillow on the side.

I still haven't adjusted to it yet, but it's a much better alternative than if both my ears were pierced. Then I'd have to sleep dead straight like a mummy.

4. Your ear might get itchy, which may lead to infection.

Because your ear is still getting used to the foreign object lodged through it, it's bound to get a bit itchy – mainly by the fourth day. But remember, do not touch your ear, and do not play with your earrings. A cartilage piercing is not only much more likely to get infected but if it does become infected, you'll need very strong antibiotics which may not even take effect in time. Worse case scenario, your cartilage will literally die and be surgically removed.

This is why cartilage piercings should be reserved for adults or mature young adults – not kids. Most places like Claire's have a legal guardian sign for everyone under 18 and restrict cartilage piercings to ages 12 and up, since kids are more likely to give in to the urge to scratch and pull their ears.

5. For the next six months, do everything slowly and carefully when near your ear.

At the end of the day, as long as you're gentle and clean with your piercings, your ear will heal in three to six months. However, just because it looks healed from the outside doesn't mean it's fully healed on the inside, so continue to maintain your original stud piercings until the end of the six-month period. Then, you can swap your studs out for hoops and other jewelry.

Until then, this means keeping your hair to the side opposite of the piercing or tying it up. It also means no more casually running your hands through your long hair lest you want to risk getting it caught in the stud and yanking your ear. Also, put on your shirts slowly and hoodies even slower. As for caps and hats? You might just have to go without them for a month or so because even the slight pressure of a skullcap can irritate your ear.

So to everyone hoping to get their cartilage pierced, my advice is to get it done in the spring or summer so you don't have to face the cold weather with your ears bared. In the meantime, you can sport some gorgeous ear cuffs like this one. And when you do get your ears pierced, smile wide – cause you've earned it!

Cover Image Credit: Pinterest

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No UNC Residence Hall Is The Same, So I've Provided Pros And Cons For The Top 5 First-Year Halls

Did yours make the cut?

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Residence halls are a big (and sometimes dreaded) part of the first-year experience at UNC-Chapel Hill. Honestly, though, life in the residence halls is nothing to dread. It's not perfect, but it can definitely be fun.

Beyond the convenient proximity of other first-years in the different residence halls, your social life may also benefit from UNC Housing's many community events. You get a lot of community support, too—your RA, your suite-/hallmates, your community director, and hopefully your roommate.

What about the buildings themselves, though? They're definitely not all the same. The following is a definitive list of the best five residence halls for first-years on UNC's campus.

5. Craige

http://reslife.web.unc.edu/2015/06/01/the-view-from-craige/

Pros: This residence hall is suite-style, which means there are four double rooms (i.e. eight residents per suite) and one bathroom—arguably better than sharing a larger bathroom with 20 more residents in a hall-style dorm. More privacy, a better chance of bonding with those seven other students, etc.. If you're interested in UNC basketball (and you should be, honestly), you'll be happy to know this residence hall is right up the road from the Dean Smith Center. It's also nestled into a quaint little grove of trees, which is cute.

Cons: This residence hall is (somewhat affectionately) known as Crusty Craige, and not without reason (according to previous residents). While it is in a nice location, it's still a good trek from main campus—the hill from Craige up to Manning is killer on one side, and that's just the beginning of the walk. Since the residence hall is only six floors high (and is mostly surrounded by short trees), the view isn't as impressive as that of, say, Hinton James' balconies.

4. Lewis

https://conferences.unc.edu/lodging/residence-halls/lewis-residence-hall/

Coming in at number four, Lewis is the only residence hall on this list that isn't located on South Campus.

Pros: This building does have laundry facilities, unlike some of the other residence halls on North Campus. Also, it is a remarkable one-minute walk from the student union and Davis Library, meaning you aren't nearly as likely to get lost during your first week (at least, on your way to the Pit—class buildings are a whole other story). I cannot stress this enough: it is super convenient to live so close to main campus.

Cons: You miss out on the first-year experience of living on South Campus, where most first-years begin their UNC journey. Also, there are typically less than 100 other residents in Lewis, which limits the number of people with whom you can bond during your first year (when you'll likely be the most focused on building your college network). That also means less RAs and smaller hall events. Also, it's a hall-style residence hall (this is a debatable con, though, since some people would definitely prefer hall-style over suite-style).

3. Koury

https://unc.freshu.io/melissa-cordell-751/best-freshmen-dorm-to-live-in

Pros: Koury is pretty close to the SASB buildings, which are full of great resources for first-years (namely the Learning and Writing Centers, where you can receive free tutoring, academic coaching, and feedback on your essays). There are internal suites, which means that only three other residents will be sharing a bathroom with you. This means you can furnish the bathroom with whatever rugs or trash cans you prefer, and you have a lot more privacy than in other residence halls, as far as the bathroom goes.

Cons: Since the bathroom is between the two double bedrooms, you have to clean the bathroom yourself, as well as provide your own toilet paper—the flip side of enhanced privacy is that you don't get custodial services. Also, with the internal suites, sometimes it can be more difficult to socialize with other people on the hall (although your RA is there to solve that problem!). Lastly, if you walk out of your room and forget your key, you're locked out—the door locks automatically upon shutting.

2. Hinton James

https://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2017/07/hinton-james-leaves-a-legend-and-a-legacy-in-uncs-most-populated-dorm

Maybe I'm biased—Hojo was my own first-year res hall. I'm sure someone will fight me on this, but I really enjoyed living there.

Pros: There are tons of people, which means there's a good chance you'll find some friends near your room. It's a suite-style dorm, so obviously, the suite-style advantages of Craige apply here as well. Also, there is a package center located on the first floor, so you don't have to trek to some other residence hall to pick up your latest Amazon orders. There's a huge staff of really fun RAs, which means there's always someone around with whom you can talk about any problems or concerns you may have. The view from the balconies isn't bad, either.

Cons: I encountered a roach once. Also, again, there are a lot of people in Hojo, so sometimes it's kind of loud. Not ideal if you prefer studying (or sleeping) in total silence. Lastly—and perhaps most annoyingly—this is the furthest residence hall from main campus (and therefore your classes). It's about a fifteen-minute walk to the Pit...doable, but aggravating after a while. On the bright side, it's close to several bus stops.

1. The Winner: Ehringhaus

http://reslife.web.unc.edu/2015/06/23/the-view-from-ehringhaus/

This residence hall is right behind Koury, so a lot of the location-based advantages/disadvantages still apply.

Pros: There's a bus stop literally right out front, there aren't a ridiculous number of residents (so it isn't super loud or anything), and it's suite-style. As if that isn't enough, you only have to cross the road once outside the residence hall if you're walking to class (and trust me, crossing Manning/Skipper Bowles/Ridge is a whole experience). Additionally, this residence hall is one of the closest to Subway and Rams Market.

Cons: The pronunciation isn't always agreed upon by incoming students (but by all accounts I've heard, it's pronounced like "Air-ing-house," you're welcome). Also, it's kind of far from class buildings (like a 12-minute walk from the Pit).

Really, the cons aren't bad at all. This residence hall offers all of the community excitement of Hinton James but is slightly calmer and closer to main campus. That, coupled with the fulfillment of the crucial first-year experience of living on south campus, puts Ehringhaus at number one in my book.

I think the south campus residence halls are inherently better than the north campus ones just because the daily 15-minute trek to class is practically a rite of passage for UNC first-years. That said, all of the residence halls have their unique advantages and disadvantages, and you can have an awesome first year no matter where you live.

For more information on each residence hall, I'd recommend scouring https://housing.unc.edu/housing/residence-halls. Welcome to UNC, kiddos!

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