15 Things You Learn About Yourself In College

15 Things You Learn About Yourself In College

Turns out the experience really is an eye-opener.

1. You realize the "college bubble" is real (and you're not immune to it).

You're basically living in a self-contained mini-village. Need food? Dining area. Need shelter? Dorm. Need exercise? Gym. This community can provide for (almost) all your needs, and is run by staff that are among the few who have regular connection with the outside world. Suddenly, you start to feel you may be in one of the bubbles of divergent factions (and who knows who's actually watching).

2. You realize what it takes to drive you crazy.

That guy in front of you in Western Civ? Yeah, by the end of the semester, the way he taps his pencil every time he gets irritated makes you crazy. You've been around people long enough to notice things about them and about the way things work on campus that makes you feel a little (well)... crazy.

3. You realize what can distract you (like, every time).

So paper writing is a real thing apparently. But so are... other things. By the end of the semester, you've nailed it. You know those pug faces can greet you every time you pull up that Google search, and the temptation? It's real.

4. You realize you gotta make your own happiness.

The mini-village isn't all sunshine and unicorns. So apparently you have to improvise. At college you've learned how. Sometimes, to get the happiness back, you just have to burst into dance parties in the middle of that project.

5. You realize what true vulnerability looks like and how much you need it.

Few people actually know who you really are when you got to campus during your first year. And you could've left it that way. But you need support, and you realize if you never let people in and see the real you, then you'll never really be supported.

6. You realize that you really love people (but also really can't stand them).

That girl in psychology has some serious skills. You love that. You're inspired by her. But, that girl in psychology really has some serious skills. You can't stand that. It's a weird dichotomy of existence (but oh so real).

7. You realize that sometimes all you want to do is hide.

There's people everywhere! There's people... everywhere. You may feel like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde because sometimes you want to be with the people and (other times) all you want to do is hide from their faces, talents, judgements... them.

8. You realize how much you care.

Apparently you do actually care what other people think (even though you might have told yourself otherwise). Heck, you care a whole lot about what you think about yourself. And the thoughts can just be... too much.

9. You realize that sometimes all you want to do is disrupt the system.

So you care about what people in this mini-village think, and sometimes you just wish that you didn't. You just want to throw it all aside. Start a flash-mob. Dance on your way to class. Burst out into song. Do something (anything) to go against the grain.

10. You realize stressing comes with adulting.

Stress is real, and college shows you how much you can handle before your functioning reaches level zero. Enough said.

11. You realize you have to stay sane.

So stress sneaks and steals sanity, but you gotta say no-oh. Self pep-talks may be regular occurrences. Spontaneity with the crew is a must. Whatever your outlet, you see sanity must be guarded.

12. You realize adulting is inevitable.

Apparently you actually will have to leave and get a real job someday. Have real bills. Make real phone calls. Have real responsibilities.

13. You realize you're in denial.

And you realize that now is not (quite) yet that full-on adulting time. So might as well sometimes ignore that you're technically an adult. While you still can.

14. You realize what you're made of.

College pushes you to your limits, and you are forced to actually see your limits. But maybe, this has also helped you see your strengths. You know yourself more fully, and you see what really makes you who you are and what you're capable of accomplishing.

15. You realize that (ultimately) it's really your choice.

So, how this whole college experience affects you is really up to you. It's what you make of it. And through it, you can see even more. Life (even adulting) is what you make of it. The choice is yours.

Cover Image Credit: Deborah Spooner Photography

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12 Beautiful Views Of Purdue's Campus, One For Each Month

A photo story of Purdue's beautiful campus.

Because Purdue University is located in Indiana, the campus experiences many seasonal changes. One thing is for certain, no matter the month the views are always beautiful. The photos below are meant to represent each month of the year in Boilermaker territory.


Large snowflakes are peaceful when the sidewalks are not slick.


Overcast views create a moody view from the top floor of a residence hall.


The Hello Walk is a serene view at dusk.


The white flowered trees blossom to surround the Engineering Fountain.


The campus is coated in fog and mist after a humid day.


The arch casts magnificent shadows during any time of the day.


The sunset glows down University Street from the top of Grant Street parking garage.


Students or little kids can play in Loeb Fountain during a hot day.


The sun during golden hour shines brightly on the Bell Tower.


Bright lights shine down on the Ross-Ade Stadium during a football game.


Colorful trees line campus sidewalks in the fall.


The large tree and smell of the gingerbread house fill the Purdue Memorial Union during the first weeks of the month.

Cover Image Credit: Katelyn Milligan

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3 Reasons 'Black Panther' Is A Black Cultural Icon

The cultural significance behind the celebration of blackness

Nobody ever denied the Marvel Cinematic Universe's influence over the masses, and one could look no further than the box office to understand that. Eighteen films in a franchise, though, and you'd be remiss if you thought superhero fatigue would've settled in by now.

Enter 2018, and this most recent "superhero flick" prioritizes political intrigue, race relations, and moral ambiguity in Ryan Coogler's Black Panther film, the highest-grossing film of 2018, seventh in the United States, and twentieth of all time.

The biggest debut by an African American director boasts a predominantly black cast, the best reviews (beating out both Nolan's The Dark Knight and Iron Man) for a superhero movie, and yet still garners the question: What makes Black Panther so engaging to audiences? First, let's start with

1. The Director

Ryan Coogler is a well-renowned film director, similar in vein to Quentin Tarantino only in the fact that both produce, comparatively to other high-demand filmmakers, very few but powerfully-influential works.

His first feature film, Fruitvale Station, gathered acclaim and the majority of audience/grand jury awards in 2013's Sundance Film Festival, a feat he built upon when co-writing and directing Creed, the seventh installment in the Rocky film franchise, and from both films a collaboration with actor Michael B/ Jordan further flourished.

The fact that Black Panther's director who, since the age of twenty-one served as a counselor for the incarcerated youth in San Francisco's Juvenile Hall, has very much so lived out the same life he so often realizes in his films, only further adds to why Marvel's latest feature film rings truer to its audiences.

Coogler is a founding member and avid supporter of Blackout For Human Rights, a campaign designed for the specific purpose of addressing racial and human rights violations in America.

Not simply a film director making a "quick buck" or even just passionate about filmmaking as an art form, Coogler has time and again used his cinematic voice to convey the thoughts and feelings of people of color across the silver screen for all to see. Secondly, we must consider

2. The Ethnocentric Emphasis

While many filmgoers are no stranger to race relations being confronted in a film, this was a case wherein a major company, Disney/Marvel, took it upon themselves to challenge the status quo for mainstream audiences.

This wasn't BET(Black Entertainment Television), a rap video, or a stand-up comedy routine, all of which are tried-and-true methods for people of color to communicate to a wider audience; this was Marvel, the biggest name in movies today, and they were making a move.

For a time, myself included, there was fear the message would become misconstrued or miss the mark entirely, what with impeding studio interference already having plagued prior Marvel movies.

Luckily, the black representation allowed for a rare opportunity for young black children to have a superhero they could not only empathize with, but physically resembled family they already idolized.

This in no way takes away from the many fan-favorite white superheroes, but does provide a comic book character for a subdivision of audiences marginalized on a national and even global scale.

Linking back to Coogler, the director set his sights on the advanced sciences, heightened technologies, and rich cultures envisioned within Wakanda's waterfalls and warring tribes, in contrast to other films centered around black pain and suffering.

The piece handles the racial identity of itself was dignity and pride, a welcome step forward in cinema that highlights the positive blackness can offer. Last, one cannot disregard the impact that came from

3. The Control of Characters

Think back to any Marvel movie, and you can name the Chosen One protagonist, Supportive Sidekick, and Snarky, Smarmy Love Interest-type caricatures with ease, but Coogler's sense of pride and admiration for blackness with a focus on the ethnocentric vision for Wakanda brings the people of his fictional place to life.

All these fully-realized characters make for an exciting, engaging film phenomenon where, as critics have pointed out, even central antagonist Killmonger (Erik Stevens, portrayed by Michael B. Jordan) is cast in a sympathetic light.

It is not hero v. villain(again), but a dueling of two ideologies colliding in a struggle that transgresses the physical combat and becomes a philosophically-intriguing debate that, by the film's conclusion, makes for two sides forever changed.

No one character is painted in a negative fashion, or without redeemable qualities, and again creates persons both for and against immigration, in favor of and against union between "people that look like us across the globe"(black) and "colonizers" (white).

Black Panther is a monumental movie with ties to other racially-motivated pieces, a la A Raisin in the Sun, that posits African-Americans in a heroic scene. It is personal favorite of mine, and hopefully, this helps you understand exactly.

Cover Image Credit: flickr

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