Kylie Jenner Is Absolutely NOT A 'Self-Made' Billionaire, Don't @ Me

Kylie Jenner Is Absolutely NOT A 'Self-Made' Billionaire, Don't @ Me

Being handed everything while growing up doesn't make you "self-made," sweetie.

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As everybody who has any type of social media platform will know, Kylie Jenner has recently earned her billionaire status. According to Forbes, she is now considered to be the "youngest self-made billionaire ever." I'm sorry, self-made? That gave me a good laugh.

Kylie Jenner is the furthest thing from a self-made anything. She was born into a family of celebrities. She grew up around opulent wealth. She was handed the money to start her own company. She had people teach her the makeup skills and knowledge she has. She didn't go to YouTube and struggle trying to learn from tutorials, that's for damn sure. Yes, she did turn her investment into her billions, but she is the opposite of self-made.

As a tweet from Dictionary.com so wisely pointed out, the definition of self-made is literally "Having succeeded in life unaided." Pretty sure you had some help along the way there, Ms. Spoiled Jenner.

I'm sure everyone reading this right now is thinking, "Oh, she's just jealous that she isn't a billionaire" but that is 100% not the point. And I'm not jealous. I'm angry. I respect the people who come from absolutely nothing and build themselves into the most successful people they can be, not the ones who are celebrated for basically being born into wealth that aided them in their journey. Cough cough, Donald Trump and his "small investment of $1 million."

You want a self-made billionaire? Look at Jeffery Starr. He was handed nothing. He slept on friend's couches and was basically homeless at some points. He struggled with mental illness and not being taken seriously for his craft. Now he owns a multi-million dollar cosmetics line.

I'm tired of celebrities and those with ridiculous amounts of money trying to claim the prestigious labels of people who actually worked for said label. Exhibit A, the fact that the Kardashians got their kickoff into fame because Kim made a sex tape. And they continue to be famous because people are so amused by their stupidity on "Keeping Up With The Kardashians."

Seriously? Stop making people like this famous. It's honestly embarrassing and it overshadows the people in this world who are striving for and reaching their goals. So no, I don't think Kylie Jenner deserves her "self-made" billionaire status. Period.

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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Dear Olivia Jade

An expression of concern on behalf of the student body.

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Dear Olivia Jade,

Almost nineteen years ago I was born in Long Beach, California, to an immigrant mother and a father who would soon be essentially jobless. Both my parents went back to school when I was a child - my father got his law degree online and is now a public defender, and my mother got her degree in biology from Fresno State. It was incredibly difficult for both of them to do this and raise three children, but they did, and I am eternally grateful. From a young age, I was taught that education is important. You make sacrifices for it. It means a lot more to people than game days and partying.

Unfortunately, they never taught me that this country's educational system is incredibly classist (I have Twitter and my AP Composition teacher in high school to thank for that). For this demonstration, I'm going to have to talk about myself more - I'm sure as a vlogger you understand. When I applied to USC, I had a 3.8 GPA, took 9 AP classes, was heavily involved in choir, started a club for mental health awareness, and had written decent essays. I worked hard in high school, and I deserved to get in. But I was pretty privileged compared to most kids. I lived in a two bedroom apartment with my dad, but we were living comfortably. I had a laptop to study with, and if I needed anything for school he was there to support me. Furthermore, my high school's average family income was in the upper 9% compared to other schools, and having rich parents around means bigger donations, smaller class sizes, more extracurricular opportunities and overall a better quality education. The environment I was in encouraged me to succeed in a system where a degree from an elite university is seen as the key to entering the 1%, even though the only people who can truly afford it are in that top 1%. But I was grateful for the opportunities I had been given, and I chose USC because I thought that in the long run, it was worth the financial risk.

Still, sometimes I wished I was like you. You, with your famous parents, YouTube money, millions of followers, and excellent bone structure. You, with your carefree attitude about school, not having to worry about your midterms, not having to worry about getting a job, not having to worry about financial aid. But the fact of the matter is, whether or not you knew about the entire scam, you sit on a throne of privilege and lies. You were admitted to USC because your parents bribed your way in. You and your sister received scholarships from USC when they could have gone to two students who were much more deserving.

I'll admit, when this story broke it hurt me on a personal level. Right now I'm considering taking a year off from school and preparing to transfer, because I literally cannot afford to go here, and it is devastating. I can't tell you how bad it feels, as someone who worked so hard despite struggling with mental illness and was even hospitalized in high school, to get a reality check only halfway through your first semester that going to your dream school is no longer feasible. And I'm not alone. I have too many friends in similar situations, who have either accepted their impending debt, or who may drop out. We are the minority at USC, but the unfortunate majority of college students. We aren't here to have fun, we're here to get a degree. To get a job. To not disappoint our parents who sacrificed so much for us. To survive.

And that's why you should drop out.

At orientation, we were all told the five traits of a Trojan: faithful, skillful, scholarly, courageous, and ambitious. I do not know you well enough to know if you are faithful, courageous, or ambitious (skillful at social media and marketing, maybe), but you are most certainly not scholarly (aside from the whole mom paying $500,000 to get you in thing, your school-hating tweets are further proof). And if you and your sister don't drop out of USC, you won't have any integrity either. Two hard-working, bright, and deserving transfer applicants will be denied the opportunity of getting to study at an amazing school because of you taking their spots. They need this degree. You don't.

If, by a long shot, you're reading this, I hope you don't see this letter as a personal attack, rather, advice. An expression of concern on behalf of the student body. After all, you don't need a college degree to party in LA.

Sincerely,

A broke, frustrated, yet hopeful college student.

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