How A Business Competition United A Community

How A Business Competition United A Community

Let there be light, let there be community.
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In a world dominated by corporate power, we as a society are trained to think that those in the field of business are evil. The stigmas continue to grow whether it be through the media or on college campuses.The media has a way of influencing our opinions-whether its Bernie Sanders saying the "top 1%" controls the economy or Donald Trump saying he is a "successful business man". In terms of college, we view those who major in business as coming from a relaxed family, with the intention that they do not have to work as hard as other majors to make a living. Regardless, business has a negative connotation in today's modern day world.

Rollins College recently created an event to change this viewpoint around, and thus bring together a community of change makers.

The event was called "Ideas for Good" and challenged individuals from all majors around Rollins to come together for a friendly competition.

The purpose of this competition was for competitors to introduce an idea that is purposeful in bringing awareness to a subject to enact social change. The idea could be a good or a service, and can be centered around anywhere around the world. The beauty behind this competition was that there was a variety of original ideas to chose from, and through the help of the Social Innovation Hub, these ideas could later be brought to life.

The "idea" had to have a model of development, as well as a place for which it could be implemented. Furthermore, this idea had to be presented in front of a crowd of individuals,where 5 qualified judges evaluated the ideas being presented to them. These five individuals were people who either had a Business degree or hold their own business, thus showing they have the experience to be passed down to the competitors. The value behind having these judges is that they not only held an objective opinion to evaluate the competitors, but also served a direct purpose in offering advice to any competitor on how to make their product or service better in today's world market.

The competition also included participants from India (during their business exchange program) to participate and spread their ideas.

Throughout the competition, 20 competitors brought ideas to be implemented both in the United States and India. An overall positive impact was brought towards the judges, and a lot of positive reinforcement through feedback was given to the competitors. Three winners, all Rollins College students, were announced at the end of the competition (two received 500 dollars and the first place prize received 1000 dollars).

The key was that everyone that participated were winners. Everyone was handed a certificate,

In addition, everybody's voices were heard: regardless of race, gender, or place of origin, students from around the world were brought together in a peaceful space to share ideas and enact change.

Through this method, there was a sense of understanding for the power of business. Business, in its social purpose, is meant to inspire and help bring justice in struggling sectors. Through social entrepreneurship, students find solutions to combat issues that are often overlooked. Therefore, business is positive-in its ability to make an impact and its ability to bring people, from around the world, the ability to be future world leaders.

Cover Image Credit: Emaze

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A Letter To My Humans On Our Last Day Together

We never thought this day would come.
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I didn't sleep much last night after I saw your tears. I would have gotten up to snuggle you, but I am just too weak. We both know my time with you is coming close to its end, and I just can't believe it how fast it has happened.

I remember the first time I saw you like it was yesterday.

You guys were squealing and jumping all around, because you were going home with a new dog. Dad, I can still feel your strong hands lifting me from the crate where the rest of my puppy brothers and sisters were snuggled around my warm, comforting puppy Momma. You held me up so that my chunky belly and floppy wrinkles squished my face together, and looked me right in the eyes, grinning, “She's the one."

I was so nervous on the way to my new home, I really didn't know what to expect.

But now, 12 years later as I sit in the sun on the front porch, trying to keep my wise, old eyes open, I am so grateful for you. We have been through it all together.

Twelve “First Days of School." Losing your first teeth. Watching Mom hang great tests on the refrigerator. Letting you guys use my fur as a tissue for your tears. Sneaking Halloween candy from your pillowcases.

Keeping quiet while Santa put your gifts under the tree each year. Never telling Mom and Dad when everyone started sneaking around. Being at the door to greet you no matter how long you were gone. Getting to be in senior pictures. Waking you up with big, sloppy kisses despite the sun not even being up.

Always going to the basement first, to make sure there wasn't anything scary. Catching your first fish. First dates. Every birthday. Prom pictures. Happily watching dad as he taught the boys how to throw every kind of ball. Chasing the sticks you threw, even though it got harder over the years.

Cuddling every time any of you weren't feeling well. Running in the sprinkler all summer long. Claiming the title “Shotgun Rider" when you guys finally learned how to drive. Watching you cry in mom and dads arms before your graduation. Feeling lost every time you went on vacation without me.

Witnessing the awkward years that you magically all overcame. Hearing my siblings learn to read. Comforting you when you lost grandma and grandpa. Listening to your phone conversations. Celebrating new jobs. Licking your scraped knees when you would fall.

Hearing your shower singing. Sidewalk chalk and bubbles in the sun. New pets. Family reunions. Sleepovers. Watching you wave goodbye to me as the jam-packed car sped up the driveway to drop you off at college. So many memories in what feels like so little time.

When the time comes today, we will all be crying. We won't want to say goodbye. My eyes might look glossy, but just know that I feel your love and I see you hugging each other. I love that, I love when we are all together.

I want you to remember the times we shared, every milestone that I got to be a part of.

I won't be waiting for you at the door anymore and my fur will slowly stop covering your clothes. It will be different, and the house will feel empty. But I will be there in spirit.

No matter how bad of a game you played, how terrible your work day was, how ugly your outfit is, how bad you smell, how much money you have, I could go on; I will always love you just the way you are. You cared for me and I cared for you. We are companions, partners in crime.

To you, I was simply a part of your life, but to me, you were my entire life.

Thank you for letting me grow up with you.

Love always,

Your family dog

Cover Image Credit: Kaitlin Murray

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Self-Employed Entrepreneurs Deserve Your Respect, I Learned That From My Father

The "do it yourself" mindset is something I have always looked up to.

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I respect those who have a vision for their life that does not necessarily fit the cookie cutter idea of a 9-5 job. Their vision does not fit just one job title, taking on so many roles in their life. They care so much about their career that they take matters into their own hands and do it themselves.

This "do it yourself" mindset is something I totally respect and look up to. When a vision is so widespread it cannot be contained in a 9-5 job. Whether it be a side hustle, a self-made business, or an idea you are trying to expand. Wanting to branch out and start your own work environment is outstanding.

For an entrepreneur, it's not all about the money. If it was, they would have probably chosen a more "stable" job. Instead, they perceiver through various obstacles that fulfill their dreams. The self-made business is way more than the money you can make, it's about what someone can do with the money; expand their brand, or support themselves and their loved ones. It's rare in today's world to find someone who genuinely just loves their job and is not just focused on the paycheck. Entrepreneurs enjoy their work.

But most importantly, they love what their work is, what it stands for, and how it affects and impacts others. Their work can leave an impact which is essentially the whole reason why they work so hard. It's the sense of accomplishment after finishing a difficult yet fulfilling project. Those who are self-employed work long, fluctuating hours in order to see their vision come to life. They do what it takes to accomplish their goals; struggle through financial obstacles, slow periods, and self-doubt.

My personal experience with this subject is very close to my heart. My father has worked for himself, being a contractor for 10 years. I never understood the extent of his hard work until recently. I see his hard work displayed through his enthusiasm to begin a new project. The "before" and "after" pictures are absolutely astonishing. My father built his own business remodeling houses along with various other jobs for others.

Seeing my father take on a new project is so inspiring. He will be so excited, talking about the vision he has for this old, dated kitchen remodel he's doing. He will totally transform this kitchen into a modern, clean-looking space. Just this total transformation is amazing to me. The blood, sweat, and tears he puts into every project are unremarkable. But, it's not the only thing I respect about him; it's about why he chose to work for himself in the first place.

My father is the type of person to have goals, visions, and inspirations. He does not just settle for the status quo. He is constantly finding new design ideas and implementing them in his projects. The best part for him? Seeing the look on his client's face when he reveals his work. He has such pride in his work. He had such a vision that he took a risk to start his own business, not knowing how it would all pan out.

Luckily for his hard work ethic and extreme talent, I've watched as my father grew his brand into something so successful. This never came without some hard times along the way. To me, that's what it's all about when you first decide to be a self-employed entrepreneur. The amount of respect I have for people who decide to take this risk and spark their dream into reality is unspeakable.

If you have a dream, it is definitely possible to achieve. I've watched my father grow his talent from the ground up in order to make a living. Take your passions, dreams, and goals and run with them. If you have a vision and want to make a difference, you should go after it and build off of it. Being original, working hard, and making a difference is most definitely respected.

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