Invisible Disabilities

Invisible Disabilities

My Story
Fran
Fran
1443
views

Not All Disabilities are Visible.

I have contemplated and debating publishing my first article. Writing has always been something that has been therapeutic for me. I am a very confident, strong young woman with my whole life ahead of me. However, it is time for me to acknowledge something very personal to me that up until now besides my family and three of my good friends.

There is no manual on how to be a successful person with a disability. The piece about my disability I do typically disclose is that I was born with a condition called congenital hydrocephalus. The way it affects people varies. I am thankful that I am one of the people that can function on a relatively normal level—for that I am eternally grateful.

The biggest obstacle I have had to overcome/learn to adapt to involve spatial relations. What people do tend to notice are my hand tremors—which I also attribute to my mental health battle with anxiety. I also learned how to ride a bike a bit later than those the same age. To this day, I am unable to drive myself independently and at this point, I may or may not ever be able to drive a car independently. Up until now, I have been ashamed and embarrassed that I have been unable to drive independently. I have been ashamed and embarrassed by something I cannot change about myself.

I read an interesting article that I urge you to read—especially if you care about me in any capacity. I want people to understand more about hydrocephalus—there are less than 200,000 cases diagnosed in a year. I have a VP shunt which was first placed the day I was born—however; it wound up getting infected the second day and a new one had to be placed. To this day I have only had two shunt revisions. The second revision was back in 1997 or 1998 when I was two or three years old. The most recent revision was done back in December 2008. I have had this current shunt for less than ten years. Others diagnosed with hydrocephalus can go through many revisions.

I urge you to research about congenital hydrocephalus and hydrocephalus in general. I would also like to invite you to ask me questions about my condition. From this day forward, I am no longer allowing my condition to embarrass me. I am a strong, confident, beautiful twenty-two-year-old young woman who is so much more than a medical condition.

Cover Image Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/428475352032338581/?lp=true

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100 Ways To Practice Self-Care In Your Everyday Life, In 20 Minutes Or Less

Simple ways to start taking care of yourself.

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Life is overwhelming and distracting so it's easy to forget about yourself sometimes, but practicing small self-care acts is easy. Making time for yourself every day isn't selfish and is really good for your mental health. I think it's important for everyone to spend time doing things that make them happy and more calm, even if you only dedicate 20 minutes each day. Putting yourself first can lead to growth so many other aspects of your life.

Obviously, each person is allowed to practice self-care in their own unique way, but here are some ideas to get you started!

1. Do something new. 

2. Make a list of things you need to get done that week. 

3. Drink some hot tea. 

4. Go for a walk on a scenic trail.

5. Paint your nails.

6. Have a good laugh.

7. Buy yourself flowers.

8. Light a candle.

9. Do some tidying up.

10. Don't feel bad for saying 'no.'

11. Listen to music.

12. Slow down.

13. Drink a smoothie.

14. Run mindless errands.

15. Write down your goals for the week.

16. Talk to someone about the future.

17. Wake up early and get coffee. 

18. Take care of a plant. 

19. Take a bubble bath. 

20. Give yourself a compliment.

21. Give a stranger a compliment.

22. Watch a movie.

23. Put your phone down.

24. Declutter your personal space.

25. Go to bed early. 

26. Pray or meditate. 

27. Go for a drive. 

28. Make it a habit to stargaze. 

29. Read a book. 

30. Read poems. 

31. Sing loudly. 

32. Make a list of things you're grateful for. 

33. Drink a lot of water. 

34. Put on make-up for no reason.

35. Watch funny videos. 

36. Take a deep breath. 

37. Distance yourself from negativity. 

38. Unfollow people you don't care to follow on social media. 

39. Have a pajama day. 

40. Read an inspirational book. 

41. Call your parents/ loved ones. 

42. Donate old clothing. 

43. Dedicate a day out of the week to not eating meat. 

44. Do a fun craft or DIY project. 

45. Put on a face mask and relax. 

46. Do a small workout. 

47. Take a power nap. 

48. Listen to a podcast. 

49. Open a window. 

50. Open your curtains in the morning to let in natural light. 

51. Make your bed. 

52. Cook dinner instead of eating out. 

53. Play/ cuddle with an animal. 

54. At the end of the day, think of all the positive things that happened.

55. Moisturize. 

56. Buy a comforting blanket. 

57. Give someone a hug. 

58. Create a vision board. 

59. Have some alone time.

60. Enjoy the sun on your skin. 

61. Dance like nobody is watching.

62. Walk in the rain every once in a while. 

63. Drive with the windows down. 

64. Give someone a gift for no reason. 

65. Get a massage. 

66. Do something that gets your adrenaline running. 

67. Spend the day at the library or a book store. 

68. Organize your work space/ binders. 

69. Spend a weekend in. 

70. Recognize hard work and reward yourself. 

71. Sign up for a work out class. 

72. Eat lunch with a friend. 

73. Spend the day helping others. 

74. Get your hair done. 

75. Have a good cry. 

76. Use sticky notes. 

77. Color code your planner. 

78. Print out pictures and hang them up. 

79. Hang motivational quotes on your mirror and read them when you get ready. 

80. Do random acts of kindness. 

81. Buy fuzzy socks. 

82. Redecorate or rearrange furniture. 

83. Be present. 

84. Set a new years resolution. 

85. Make a bucket list. 

86. Stretch in the morning. 

87. Watch an interesting documentary. 

88. Make a music playlist.

89. Watch the sunrise or sunset. 

90. Explore somewhere new.

91. Be slow to respond to negativity. 

92. Have a game night with friends. 

93. Buy concert tickets. 

94. Have a nightly routine before bed. 

95. Eat your favorite dessert. 

96. Do something you've been putting off. 

97. Invest in essential oils. 

98. Manage your finances. 

99. Buy a new outfit. 

100. Make your own gratitude list. 

Try at least one of these every week and see how you feel! I guarantee you will notice a difference in the way you are living your life.

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Imagine If You Could Not Recognize A Person By Their Face

Prosopagnosia is an illness where the individual suffering from it cannot recognizes faces.

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In simple words, Prosopagnosia is an illness where the individual suffering from it cannot recognizes faces. The term Prosopagnosia comes from the Greek words for 'face' and 'lack of knowledge.'

It is also known as face blindness or facial agnosia. They are unable to recognize familiar people by just looking at their face and have to rely on other cues such as context, hairstyle, clothing to recognize someone. They do have trouble recognizing people once these cues have been changed, like meeting someone out of context or if they get a haircut.

Most people only have trouble recognizing faces, but sometimes the impairment even extends to objects, cars and animals. Many people have trouble with face processing. For example, they would not be able to judge someone's age or gender, emotional expression, or the direction of a person's gaze.

They also tend to have navigational difficulties. The other problem is that they have trouble following plots in movies or television shows as they cannot keep track of the characters. They also have trouble imagining the faces of the people they know.

This can affect people's lives in different ways. Some people have learned how to cope with it. They have found other ways to recognize people. Some people though have extreme difficulties cease of it. They end up avoiding social interactions and it creates problems in their interpersonal relationships and career. Some people even end up with social anxiety disorder in which they avoid and fear social situations.

It is a more common problem than people seem to think it is. It affects people in two different ways, some people get it after suffering neurological damage(acquired prosopagnosia) and some are born with (developmental prosopagnosia). There may be a genetic component to face prosopagnosia. Acquired prosopagnosia is very rare but developmental prosopagnosia is much more common. One 50 people may be suffering from this condition.

Acquired prosopagnosia occurs after a brain injury, stroke and onset of a degenerative disease. Developmental prosopagnosia occurs during childhood. It may be due to genetic factors or a prenatal brain damage or abnormality.

If you are wondering whether you are affected by this then as yourself these questions. Have you ever failed to recognize a close family member or friend, when you weren't expecting to see them? D you try to remember someone new by their hairstyle or a distinctive feature instead of their face? Do you confuse characters on television more than other people? Have there been times when you have failed to recognize your own self in the mirror or in pictures? Do you have problem recognizing people that wave at you on the street? Do you have difficulty recognizing someone after they have had a haircut? Do you have a hard time recognizing people if you see them out of context? If most of your answers were yes then you might be dealing with face prosopagnosia. It is better to get a doctor's opinion on the matter.

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