Graduation season rolls around and the stores are stocked with the black and gold, the hats fly, and classmates part ways. The same spiels about success, the future, nostalgia, and friendship are given at the ceremonies. Graduation is such a mushy affair and that is what I can't stand about it.

If other people were close to each other and are going separate ways, I guess they can do mushy. Just don't assume that each and every person in the graduating class was ever sentimentally attached to the members of their class. I sure was glad to graduate from community college last year. The curriculum was difficult and the fact that I was even graduating was a relief. I survived!

As for the classmates, many of them were annoying and going separate ways after having been stuck in the same small class for two years was also a relief. As for the first year students and those few in my graduating class who didn't drive me up the wall, we agreed to keep in touch. That was it. On my part, there were no tears. Any hint of "Aw, you're leaving? It's over?" was very brief and it didn't really hurt. It takes practice. Even I'm surprised.

When I heard my friends who graduated last weekend saying how they were going to miss each other so much, never forget each other, and to keep in touch, I couldn't help but think, "Sure, you say this now, but once you're all busy with your lives and jobs, your friends from next year won't be overwhelming your thoughts and even if you do call, email, or write, there is always the possibility of the other not responding." I've been there.

There may be speeches about friendship and people will get all emotional, but in my opinion, what matters most is that you've earned a high enough GPA to walk across the stage, get a diploma, and in the cases of some of my friends, get accepted into jobs (many are pursuing teaching).

People come and go from your life. Deal with it. People ask me if I've made any new friends at the university I go to now and it's awkward to say no, but it's by choice that I remain unattached. Plus, the school is much bigger, thus making it harder to keep track of your acquaintances, especially if you live off-campus.

If you don't regularly get to see or talk to someone, there's no opportunity to really make friends. That community college was small so like it or not, we were stuck together. I was planning to be friendless by choice then as well (to better focus on academics and because it was my last year so I saw no point).

However, the close proximity made it so I would run into the people who considered me a friend often enough and the only right thing to do was to reciprocate that favor. I'll talk to people in a friendly manner. I won't shove people away. There's just a difference between getting attached to someone and just allowing people in and out of your daily life.

Knowledge matters in the real world and social interactions can help to keep your sanity. All of this is just my opinion. You may have yours, I just don't like the sentimental mush.