If you've read my articles before, you know that I am a huge comic book movie fan (particularly Marvel ones). And this mere fact, as you would guess, would ultimately lead me to the curiosity of attending the kind of event that gathers fans from all corners of the world for a collective gathering that most of the time lasts for more than one day.

This little something is what I'd like to call Comic Con.

Although I have only attended one of them twice, I am knowledgable enough to know that there are many different kinds of Comic Cons— ranging from the topic, company or geographic location. The two most popular of them all, however, are considered to be San Diego Comic Con held every late July and New York Comic Con that takes place every early October (in which I'd like to call myself a veteran of in particular).

Now I may not be a pro NYCC goer, but I am a fan that knows I thoroughly enjoy going to them. From the panels and screenings, to the awesome guests and endless rows of booths offering unique merchandise and artwork, it is truly an event like no other. They traditionally need four days to do it all, so you know it's going to be good anyways every time.

You really get to see just how many other people in this world love the same things you do; and these people's cosplays (a.k.a. when they dress up in costumes of their favorite characters/famous personalities)! Some of them get so creative with it and others go to extreme lengths to look identical to some of their favorite characters. All in all, it is a time to appreciate the things you love, whatever they may be, but to also not feel weird for loving them so much.

As with anything, however, there are some not-so delightful aspects of it. And for a convention like NYCC, it is definitely the overwhelmingness of it all.

According to CNBC, New York Comic Con sold a total of more than 200,000 tickets for the four-day event this year; and it honestly did seem like there was that many people there when I was only able to attend the first day. No matter where you are in the huge three-floor vicinity that is the Javits Center, there is almost always a sea of people to get through; it's literally worse than walking the busy streets of New York around rush hour. I definitely don't recommend this experience for anyone who has intense claustrophobia, because even for myself who is an avid concert goer, I got pretty nervous into the day of just getting to where I wanted to go. My anxiety started to spike higher than normal being in the huge crowd, and this lead me to not minding being able to only get the one ticket for that day.

Of course, there's also expenses to worry about. For a college student that is trying to save up for fun future trips and possibly a new MacBook, I spent well over $100 in one day on food, transportation, and (awesome) merchandise. Nonetheless, I knew I was going to be spending that much money regardless and I had the funds prepared in advance, but it is tempting to buy those expensive exclusives only available at conventions like these.


My NYCC haul included two originally designed posters from two separate artists. The biggest purchase was the Captain America shield sterling silver earrings (center) made by Comic Book Jewelry that are also licensed by Marvel Entertainment.Francesca DiPisa


This may sound insane, but I also got anxiety from thinking about just how many comic book genre/movie/television/cartoons/anime fans are in the world, let alone humans in general. Standing in the massive line to get in the Javits Center became one of those moments where I realized I am just one person in this very big world— something everyone loses sight of in the everyday life. In my selfish thoughts, I was thinking how I was just one fan amongst many, and how my love for everything Marvel was automatically jumbled into the sea of others.

To paint this picture clearer, my sister got an autograph from Tom Hiddleston, who plays Loki in the MCU. As I stood in line with her to see this monumental moment happen, as well as to catch a gorgeous glimpse of the talented man, it dawned on me that I am just one of the probably thousand of people this guy is seeing in one of the two days he'd be at the convention. I realize I'm sounding so conceded as I write this, but this realization made me feel very small in the moment.

But the joy of Comic Con soon eliminated that sudden realization. It is amazing to realize that these pieces of art and characters, no matter the platform, has touched so many people from all walks of life. To be able to create something like that to be universally appreciated and interpreted in different ways by so many people, and for those people to have an outlet in the things they love is something pretty extraordinary to me.

It may be silly to see an Instagram post of someone you know dressed in a Halloween-like costume to go to a place where all of these so-called geeks are gathering together. I admit, I could be embarrassed sometimes to be caught in the act of fangirling, myself; but hey, I am one of them, and I wouldn't change that for anything.


This year, I made an attempt to cosplay as Scarlett Witch/Wanda Maximoff from "Avengers: Age of Ultron."Isabella DiPisa