Going on a Blind Date

Going on a Blind Date

What Guys Really Think About Blind Dates
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By the time I hit 21, I was starting to wonder if it was ever going to happen. A real boyfriend, that is. But my own personal worry was nothing compared to my friends, who'd been on me about it since I hit college. One thing I'd come to learn is that people either found it entirely fine that I'd never dated long-term (my closest friends) or they found it entirely weird (everyone else). Suddenly, so did I.

My college roommate wasted no time on the project right after I let my guard down over beers. I agreed to be set up, so long as it could be kept casual and she'd swear to never tell a soul.

I had a bad feeling about the whole thing, but I also didn't feel like I had tons of other options. She wasn't my BFF, but she lived with me and knew me pretty well, so she must know my type, right?

Getting Dinner

Andy picked me up two floors down from his own dorm room. We hit up a casual diner around the block from a party where we were meeting our mutual friend, my roommate, later. Things started out well enough; he was just as cute as described and just as nervous as I was. I was pleasantly surprised at how non-awkward it felt.

At the diner, Andy brushed the menu aside and sputtered out, "I know what I'm having. You're good right?" And though I'd never been to the place (and often take my precious time ordering) I didn't want to ruffle feathers and ordered the first vegetarian thing I saw.

Getting Grilled







And then it happened. Out of seemingly nowhere, Andy went into "speed dating" mode, quizzing me about my entire life. I tried to keep my composure, but after running down my basic life history, I was starting to get a bit uncomfortable.

Eventually, he shifted to music, which I can talk about at length, but it somehow turned into him lecturing me about my tastes (which apparently conveyed that I was "depressed"). I may have gotten five words in total, and left the restaurant feeling like I'd either just been in therapy or a police interrogation.

Getting It
After a breathless walk to the party, Andy and I went our separate ways. And though I was pretty certain the non-interest was mutual, I spent the rest of the night avoiding him like the plague.

Insulted by the match-up, I wasn't particularly warm to my roommate either. If there's one thing I gained from the whole experience, it was learning that she didn't know me at all. What exactly did she think of me?

Years later, I'm still in the same spot, but I've never let another friend set me up. The truth is, awkwardness aside, sometimes no one knows what you need in a relationship more than you. In my opinion, you're better off waiting and figuring it out on your own.








This article was originally published on Loveawake dating site. Edited and published with permission from the author.

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20 Signs You Were A High School Cheerleader

You got really tired of hearing, "Point your toes."
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Cheerleading is something you'll never forget. It takes hard work, dedication, and comes with its ups and downs. Here are some statements that every cheerleader, past and present, know to be true.

1. You always had bobby pins with you.

2. Fear shot through you if you couldn't find your spankees right away and thought you left them at home.

3. You accumulated about 90 new pairs of tennis shoes...

4. ...and about 90 new bows, bags, socks, and warm ups.

5. When you hear certain songs from old cheer dance mixes it either ruins your day or brings back happy memories.

6. And chances are, you still remember every move to those dances.

7. Sometimes you catch yourself standing with your hands on your hips.

8. You know the phrase, "One more time, ladies" all too well.

9. The hospitality rooms were always one of the biggest perks of going to tournaments (at least for me).

10. You got really tired of hearing, "Point your toes."

SEE ALSO: How The Term 'Cheerlebrity' Destroyed Our Sport

11. If you left the gym at half-time to go get something, you better be back by the time the boys run back out.

12. You knew how awkward it could be on the bus rides home after the boys lost.

13. But you also knew how fun it could be if they won.

14. Figuring out line-up was extremely important – especially if one of your members was gone.

15. New uniforms were so exciting; minus the fact that they cost a fortune.

16. You know there was nothing worse than when you called out an offense cheer but halfway through, you had to switch to the defense version because someone turned over the ball.

17. You still know the school fight song by heart and every move that goes with it.

SEE ALSO: Signs You Suffer From Post-Cheerleading Depression

18. UCA Cheer Camp cheers and chants still haunt you to this day.

19. You know the difference between a clasp and a clap. Yes, they're different.

20. There's always a part of you that will miss cheering and it will always have a place in your heart.

Cover Image Credit: Doug Pool / Facebook

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Serena Williams Fights Sexism at US Open

The way we treat male and female professional tennis players has to be the same.

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For 14 years I lived in Southern California, a hub for sports like tennis and water polo; many players that eventually sign to play division 1 sports or eventually enter the professional tennis world get their start in the sunny climate of California. Growing up near the greater Los Angeles area meant that I lived near where the greatest female tennis player of all time got her start. It's common knowledge that both Serena Williams and her sister Venus Williams have roots in Compton, a blue-collar city in Los Angeles known for its high crime rates.

I had the amazing opportunity of seeing Serena play in 2016 at the BNP Paribas played in Indian Wells, CA. Watching her sure power and her commandment of the court left me in awe. Growing up as a young girl playing tennis practically ensures having Serena as an idol, and I was no different. Naturally, seeing her slammed by critics for her outburst during the US Open earlier this September left me appalled. Set to win her 24th Grand Slam title, Williams lost to Naomi Osaka, the first Japanese man or woman to win a Grand Slam.

The problem that many see as controversial is the treatment of Williams by umpire Carlos Ramos, citing Williams's "verbal abuse" that cost her a game penalty and the point penalty because of a smashed racquet. This especially infuriated me because the male tennis players are frequently celebrated for their emotional outbursts; they are praised for their passion. This incident goes back to the traditional gender roles that we as a society celebrate. When a woman asserts, her dominance, she's bossy. When a man does, he's the man. We as a society accept anger more when it comes from a man than from a woman, and it needs to stop. The first step is recognizing sexism where it happens, which is what Serena did. I am now even more proud to call her my idol.

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