Friday Night Football is King

Friday Night Football is King

Lessons learned growing up on the sidelines
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There is a group of people that were raised on a field they will probably never play a game on. They have been going to football games since they were only months old. They love the game and have learned from the game, even though they haven’t ever stepped on the field. They are coaches’ daughters, born and raised on the sidelines with a never ending love for the game of football.

As coaches’ daughters we are a breed of our own, we have laughed and cried in the stands on Friday nights. We have endured countless "Remember the Titans" and "Friday Night Lights" references, but in all reality we are all too much like Sheryl (Hayden Panettiere’s character in "Remember the Titans"), and we are proud of it. We will pace back and forth in the stands and bury are head in our hands when we just can’t bear to watch the next play (even though we are probably watching in between our fingers.)

As a coaches’ daughter, people underestimate your knowledge of football and look at you like you are crazy when you explain to them what the textbook definition of targeting is, or explain any other aspect of the game. People yell at your dad from the stands about a play call, something that you have grown used to; so you just sit there and snicker because you know it was their son that missed their block or didn’t run the correct route. You grew up with hundreds of boys that were like your brothers, and when you were little treated you like a queen. You always had your favorite player, even though you didn’t tell anyone (except maybe your mom) who it was. These are just things that come with the title of coach’s daughter.

You learned that hard work pays off. You watched teams work hard in the weight room and reap the benefits on the field. You also watched teams who didn’t work in the weight room have to deal with the consequences. You learned to set big goals and work towards them, what’s the worst that can happen. You get better. You learned that your mom was the strongest person you knew because she basically became a single parent during football season. You got strong because you were always running around chasing “the boys”. You love your title as the coach’s daughter but you love your dad so much more. Faith, Family and Football is what you live and die for.

Cover Image Credit: Emily Fulton

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I Blame My Dad For My High Expectations

Dad, it's all your fault.
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I always tell my dad that no matter who I date, he's always my number one guy. Sometimes I say it as more of a routine thing. However, the meaning behind it is all too real. For as long as I can remember my dad has been my one true love, and it's going to be hard to find someone who can top him.

My dad loves me when I am difficult. He knows how to keep the perfect distance on the days when I'm in a mood, how to hold me on the days that are tough, and how to stand by me on the days that are good.

He listens to me rant for hours over people, my days at school, or the episode of 'Grey's Anatomy' I watched that night and never once loses interest.

He picks on me about my hair, outfit, shoes, and everything else after spending hours to get ready only to end by telling me, “You look good." And I know he means it.

He holds the door for me, carries my bags for me, and always buys my food. He goes out of his way to make me smile when he sees that I'm upset. He calls me randomly during the day to see how I'm doing and how my day is going and drops everything to answer the phone when I call.

When it comes to other people, my dad has a heart of gold. He will do anything for anyone, even his worst enemy. He will smile at strangers and compliment people he barely knows. He will strike up a conversation with anyone, even if it means going way out of his way, and he will always put himself last.

My dad also knows when to give tough love. He knows how to make me respect him without having to ask for it or enforce it. He knows how to make me want to be a better person just to make him proud. He has molded me into who I am today without ever pushing me too hard. He knew the exact times I needed to be reminded who I was.

Dad, you have my respect, trust, but most of all my heart. You have impacted my life most of all, and for that, I can never repay you. Without you, I wouldn't know what I to look for when I finally begin to search for who I want to spend the rest of my life with, but it might take some time to find someone who measures up to you.

To my future husband, I'm sorry. You have some huge shoes to fill, and most of all, I hope you can cook.

Cover Image Credit: Logan Photography

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Your Relationship With Your Parents Changes Over Time, Here's Why

Four ways in which your relationship with your parents change from age eighteen to twenty-two.

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Over spring break I had time to think about all the different ways in which my relationship with my parents has changed throughout college. We've definitely had our ups and downs, but as graduation grows closer, I take time to note how far we have come. From freshman to senior year of college I have undergone a drastic change in how I appreciate my parents.

At eighteen, I wanted to get as far away from my parents as possible. I was going to college in order to be independent, study, and hopefully make a career for myself. Nothing could stop me and no one could give me advice. I was stubborn and hungry to explore the new life that awaited me. I didn't realize how hard it would be being on my own for the first time ever. I had never even been to camp let alone moved to a different state not knowing a single soul. I was happy for the new opportunities but quickly realized how much I had been sheltered. Initially, I resented my parents for my little life experience going into college but as the years have passed I realized I can't be so immature to put my lack of knowledge on them. As an adult I now make things work and advocate for myself. Your struggles as an individual humble you so you can come back together better and stronger than before.

Here are some ways in which the relationship between you and your parents change:

1. You don't live together 24/7, so you appreciate time spent with them.

When you're not sharing a space with your parents and they are not there to nag at you about chores, you finally get to know them as people. As an adult yourself you begin to relate to them in ways that weren't possible in childhood.

2. You realize what is worth fighting over and what is not.

You have learned how to live on your own and set boundaries. As an adult, you come back home knowing what can be improved upon within the relationship and what are things you can let go.

3. You have experience with adulthood now and can understand how really great they are.

Adult struggles are real and now as someone older and wiser, you have experienced a great many. You then begin to realize how your parents took on all these responsibilities plus the responsibility of raising/providing for you. You don't know how they did it, but suddenly you're mad at sixteen-year-old you who fought them on everything.

4. They are your biggest support system in wanting you to achieve your dreams.

There is no one quite as invested in your dreams like your parents. When you have no one to turn to and nothing to give you that extra boost of motivation, parents are there. They may not be perfect but they love you more than anyone so call your parents.

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