Fraternity Life

I Asked A Frat Preisdent What's Great About The Fraternity Life, And He Gave 11 Me Reasons

If you're involved with a Greek organization, you can relate to this.

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I met with Jimmy Frey, President of the WVU's Mu Mu Chapter of Sigma Chi for an inside look at Greek/fraternity life. Here are the 11 reasons he loves Greek life!

1. You become a better man

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy told me that being in the fraternity makes you grow up and motivates you to become a better version of yourself! In his words, "If someone tells you that you can't, you can!"

2. Networking

Jimmy Frey

This is important for anyone who will need a job one day: Networking! Jimmy explained that there are thousands of alumni and brothers, so if you are in need of a job, post on the Facebook page (for the fraternity) and a brother will help you out!

3. Better grades

Jimmy Frey

When joining Greek life, the most common concern is how this experience will impact their grades. Jimmy told me that since he joined his fraternity, Sigma Chi, his grades have been better than before! He explained how he and his brothers will go to the library together, take the same classes, and motivate each other do well! In doing so, his fraternity had higher grades than the male average—Jimmy even had the best grades of his academic career!

4. Brotherhood

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy explained to me that his brothers always motivate each other. Besides going to the library, they go to the gym, church, and just hang out with each other. This creates a healthy and positive lifestyle.

5. Giving back to the community

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy told me that his fraternity's philanthropy is "Derby Days". It is to raise money for children battling cancer. His fraternity also raised money for Colton Hodges—a local Phi Sigma member who tragically passed away—and "Stop The Hunger". All of his brothers went to a local church and bagged over 10,000 meals for this cause! Jimmy was most proud of this, as he should be!

6. Not the stereotype

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy was keen on the fact that he and his brothers are not the stereotypical fraternity men you see on T.V. and in movies. He explained that they're very respectful of women, peers, authorities, alumni, and anyone they interact with! Besides that, they're generally just friendly and outgoing!

7. Alumni are important

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy said that his chapter's alumni are very active in the brothers' lives. The Morgantown alumni chapter meets once a month and comes up with ways to better the house, ways to donate, and makes connections with the brothers!

8. Living in the house

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy said it best: "If you don't live in the house, you are missing out on the full experience! We all go to class together, eat lunch and dinner together, and yell down the hallway if we want to hang out with each other!"

9. Bigs and littles

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy told me about his big, and that every big should take a little! His big always had his back, helped him with school, and looked out for him! Because he enjoyed having that experience, he took a little and explained how it made him feel like a better person by doing the same!

10. Sorority relations

Jimmy Frey

Jimmy said that participating in different philanthropy events, fundraisers, and socials helps him to meet others! He explained how everyone in Greek life already has one thing in common, which is Greek life itself—it helps start a conversation!

11. Advice to anyone thinking about rushing

Jimmy Frey

"Don't be nervous. Go see the campus, see the world, talk to everyone! Make connections! The more you put in, the more you get out!"

After speaking to Jimmy (and being a sorority woman myself), he represents Greek life and fraternity life in the best way possible! I hope that anyone reading this feels motivated to go Greek or has a new understanding of Greek life!

As Jimmy says, "God bless!" and "Happy Freyday!"

Cover Image Credit:

Jimmy Frey

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An Open Letter To Those Not Graduating On Time

Graduating college in any number of years is an accomplishment to be proud of.
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To the person that isn't graduating on time,

It sucks, and I won't lie to you and tell you it doesn't. The day you walk out of Advising, head hanging down because you aren't going to finish in four years, makes you feel ashamed of yourself. You did well in high school; you were always told you were smart, expected to be smart, so why couldn't you make it out in four years like you were supposed to?

You know you're going to have to tell your family, so you begin preparing yourself for the worst reactions possible. And telling your friends you won't be graduating with them will only add to that sense of hopelessness.

Soon, you'll see photos and posts from people you left high school with, talking about graduation and the wonderful lives they are about to begin in their new careers. You'll wonder how they did it, and you'll feel like a failure.

But you're not.

Graduating from college is a huge deal. It really is. And it will be no less of an accomplishment in five, six, or 10 years.

"According to the Department of Education, fewer than 40 percent of students who enter college each year graduate within four years, while almost 60 percent of students graduate in six years. At public schools, less than a third of students graduate on time."

Things happen. You might change your major. You might have financial troubles. You may take a year off to figure out exactly what you want to do. That's okay. Take all the time you need. The real world and your career will still be there whenever you graduate.

Guess what else. Your family will still love you, and your friends will still support you. Give them some credit. Your loved ones want you to be happy and successful. Don't get me wrong, they may be upset at first, but give them a chance. Odds are, when the emotions settle, they will go right back to asking how classes are going. And when you do get the news that you'll be graduating, they will celebrate with you, and they will be there in the crowd, waiting for you to walk across that stage.

Graduation will happen. If you attend your class and study hard, it will happen. There is no reason to rush. Just do your best. Try your hardest. Take classes when you can. Just by doing that, you're doing more than so many others are able to do.

"Among 18 countries tracked by the OECD, the United States finished last (46 percent) for the percentage of students who completed college once they started it."

You'll get there. Take your time. Enjoy your classes. Find new interests. Study what you love. Embrace opportunities. Study abroad. Take that weird elective class. This is your time to take in everything the world has to offer. Take advantage of that. You'll graduate when you graduate, filled with pride and wisdom. And when they call your name, and you walk across that stage, hold your head up high, because you've earned every bit of your degree.

Graduating from college takes countless hours of studying, long hours in the library, and a tremendous amount of dedication. Don't add pressure to yourself by setting a timer. It is completely okay to graduate when you graduate, and it is still something to be proud of.

Best Wishes,
A woman who is finally graduating

Cover Image Credit: http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/120417041415-education-graduation-cap-story-top.jpg

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Why Open-Book Exams Make Sense

Memorization does not mean intelligence.

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In the society of high-stakes and standardized testing, it seems all students do to learn is listen to lectures and take exams. Quite often, these exams require students to work through detailed situational problems without the aid of their textbook, notes, or peers. Memorization may have been praised a half a century ago when detailed records and information were not available for everyone, everywhere. But we live in a new society now.

Memorizing a lot of random facts does not make you intelligent.

Cool, you know the names and birthdays of every U.S president. What about the legislations they pushed for or vetoed? What about the wars they got us into? What about the civil rights movements they supported? Who were they as leaders? People? Fathers? Husbands? Can any of that be answered by their name and birthday? With the entire world at our fingertips, knowing basic facts is quite unnecessary. You can Google any person, any place, any equation, any graph, any theory, and find all the answers you need. It is easy to find the information, but it may be more difficult to apply it to our real-world jobs and careers.

Odds are, you don't need this stuff memorized for your job.

When you graduate college and enter your field of study, there are thousands of resources for you to use every day to complete your jobs. Should you have some knowledge of your topic? Absolutely. But do you need absolutely everything memorized? Not a chance. You have co-workers, supervisors, handbooks, research logs, textbooks, equation sheets, etc. as you work. Whether you are a STEM student, an education student, an aspiring firefighter, or a dancer, odds are, the things you memorized in school are readily available to you in some way at your job.

Knowing how to apply the information is more important to our future jobs.

If I know all of these facts or equations but have no clue how to apply them to the task at hand, how can I be successful in my career? If I cannot take the same information and apply it to multiple situations, how will I be able to grow in my field? I will not be able to complete tasks to the best of my abilities like this. That is pretty scary, since all we are taught as we go through school is how to memorize certain facts and a very limited number of situations.

Let us take open-book exams.

Please. Pretty please. Memorizing years' worth of research and experience in a matter of a few months is extremely stressful as it is. Not to mention how much anxiety tests cause students. I guarantee you that us students just cram a few days before for the exam and then forget the information by the end of the semester. Give us an education that exposes us to the situations we will face and challenges us to grow rather than an education that forces us to regurgitate facts.

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