9 Things you know to be true if you delivered Newspapers as a kid

9 Things you know to be true if you delivered Newspapers as a kid

You know your mom loves you when she says she will drive you around the neighborhood

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Newspapers may seem obsolete in this day in age, but for decades, that is how people started their day. They got the paper and headed to work. In the movies, you see men dressed in business suits buying the paper on the street and walking to work. In suburbia and rural towns, it is often found on your porch step. How do they get on your porch? Paper boys and girls ride on their bike through the neighborhoods and throw them to their customers. To those lucky few who spent their afternoons after school delivering papers, you know these things to be true.

1. After rolling the papers, your hands always ended up black

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You get into a groove of rolling the papers and by the time that you are done rolling 30-50 papers, your hands are black from the ink. When you wash your hands, the black is gone from the hands.

2. Delivering in the winter is the worst

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I was a paper girl in the Midwest. So in the dead of winter, it got really cold. So cold, my mom got me a ski mask for Christmas to wear so that my face would not freeze from the sub-zero wind. When it snowed, I would have to walk in my snow suit, boots and bundle up so I could survive the 30 minute walk.

3. It's a blessing when your mom says she will drive your route

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When it is snowing or raining or you're running late to delivering, you know your mom loves you when she says she will drive you around the neighborhood instead of you walking or biking. It always goes quicker and you stay dry/warm.

4. Waking up early to deliver the papers on Saturday mornings

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Now whether you are a morning person or not, it's always a struggle to find yourself getting up early on a Saturday morning to do your job. I had to deliver my papers by 8 a.m. on Saturdays. So it would take me 10 minutes to roll the papers and 30 to deliver them so I had to get up at least an hour early to deliver on time.

5. Christmas time is the best

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Occasionally throughout the year, I would get tips. Christmas time (or just holiday time in general) is always the best because I would get the most tips then! Your customers will take the time to give you tips that show their appreciation for you. When you are a 12-year-old, getting 150 dollars during the month of December is the best gift you can ask for.

6. Black Friday Ads make the papers 10 times heavier

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Before the Christmastime tips, you have to deal with Black Friday. I always got holidays off, but the day after Thanksgiving was the worst because of the all the adds. The papers were so hard to roll because the papers were so thick. Not to mention carrying your bag made a small little girls shoulder hurt and make it really hard for her to ride her bike with it.

7. The paper route was probably your very first job

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In my 6th-grade language arts class, I talked to my teacher about how I get a paycheck every week for delivering papers in my neighborhood. She was so impressed and thought it taught me lots of responsibility. And she was right. I learned how to manage my time and talk to adults. I found myself stopping to talk to my customers about the weather or our own lives or just about the neighborhood. I learned great customer service skills and they still remember me because of it.

8. When trying to get another job, many people don't consider a paper route a "real job"

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I applied to 20 different jobs after I quit my paper route. When asked if I had a job before, I said I was a paper girl. Many managers believed that it wasn't a "real" job. I made a wage, I worked 6 days a week, and I had a supervisor. It was the closest thing to a real job for a middle schooler.

9. You had to patch your paper bag at least two times

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Maybe not every paper girl or boy had to deal with their paper bags, but my bag was cloth and ripped twice. I had to patch it just so it could break again. My bag would rub up against my bike tire making it wear and rip more.

Whether you dealt with some of these problems or dealt with more problems than what is on this list, being a paper carrier was a lot of work, but it's something we can look back and say we were the unique individuals that could. My dad was a paperboy and I was a paper girl. I have that bond with my father because of it. So to those former and present paper carriers, be proud of your title and have fun while doing it.

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17 Things I Wish I Knew At 17

Last year, best year.
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Seventeen. The year you begin senior year of high school. The year you begin to look at colleges and decide where you're going to spend the next four years of your life. The year you will probably have your heart broken at least once.

Your 17th year is huge. And, in hopes to help all of you 17-year-olds during your last year of high school, I've decided to share with you some insight into making this year the best year yet:

1. Every day of senior year should not be a fashion show

You've spent literally every other year of high school trying to impress your friends/the boys at your school. However, this is your last year. The fashion show is over. Forget the eyeliner every once in a while and know that wearing a T-shirt to school is actually the best thing ever.

2. The Lord is going to shut doors for a reason

... especially when it comes to college. You might not get into your dream school or you might not do so well on the SAT. Learn from it. He has a plan.

SEE ALSO: To The Girl Who Had A Plan

3. This is your last year with your best friends as your best friends

It's the hard truth, but once you get to college, you're going to make a ton of new best friends. It's totally a good thing, trust me! But this is your last year doing life with your best friends -- make it count.

4. Eat as much as you want

Yeah, enjoy the pizza for lunch/soccer practice after school routine while it lasts. College is going to kick your metabolism's butt (and not in a pretty way).

5. Don't date unless you absolutely can't help it

You have no idea where you're going to school in the fall. You have no idea where your crush is going to go. And unless you're absolutely, 100 percent convinced y'all are going to get married, don't open up the possibility of dating during your senior year. Because I promise, a relationship with one of y'all in California and one of y'all in Tennessee is never going to be a walk in the park.

6. Show off on the basketball court

... or the soccer field, or the baseball diamond, or wherever your heart desires. It's your last year to prove yourself to your teammates, opponents, and coaches. Show off a little bit -- you deserve it.

7. Be intentional

Whether it's with your best girlfriends or the rising freshmen, be a presence in their school year. It makes coming home from college to them a whole lot sweeter.

8. Don't be a punk

Despite what you think, your parents and teachers are much more wiser and smarter than you are. Don't talk back, don't fight them, and don't disobey. It will make your year a whole lot smoother.

9. What you see in the mirror is beautiful

So often my senior year I found myself wishing I saw something else in the mirror, and it caused a lot of frustration and selfishness to occur during the school year. Don't let your appearance consume you; your heart is all that matters.

10. Have school spirit

You're going to be sitting in your dorm room on the night of your high school's first home game wishing you were there. Believe me, it's going to happen. Soak up the obnoxious football chants and dress up themes while you can -- you're going to miss it.

11. Love on your parents

They're going to miss you a whole lot when you leave for college, I promise. Despite whatever fighting and frustration takes place in your home, know that they love you and are low-key dreading you leaving for school. Love on them, stay home on a Friday night to watch a movie with them, and show them as much grace as you can. This is the last year they can make you soup when you're not feeling good and give you back scratches on the hard days -- don't forget it.

12. Drama needs to be done

This is literally your last year with your entire class all together. Do you really want to spend it bickering with or gossiping about these people? Do you really want to graduate with hate in your heart for any of them? Because I know it's not worth it. Be kind, be compassionate, and be understanding.

13. Don't slack in school

Contrary to popular belief, colleges indeed look at your senior year grades. Don't slack -- it's not worth losing a scholarship or college acceptance because you "forgot" to turn in your paper or "accidentally" plagiarized the whole thing.

14. Spend time with your siblings

I know the person I missed the most when I got to school was my little sister. After this year, you're done living in the same home with your siblings 365 days a year, and I promise you're going to miss it. Don't forget about them while you're too busy doing senior things.

15. Go on spring break with your friends

It may get crazy, it may be dramatic, and it may be expensive, but the highlight of my senior year was spending a week at the beach with my best friends. We made the best memories and laughed until we cried -- so do it.

16. Take lots of pictures

No matter how annoyed your friends get with you making every hangout a "photo sesh," you're going to be so thankful you documented all of your memories when you're looking back your freshman year of college.

17. This is your last year of being a kid

This is your last year of your mom making your dinner and doing your laundry. This is your last year of studying the morning of for a test. This is your last year of being dependent on other people. Soak it up. Let your parents baby you some, and let your need for help be evident. Freshman year is going to be so sweet but so different, so be present in the season you're in.

College is so, so wonderful, but so is senior year. Take it head on and be present. Don't straighten your hair every day, don't lie to your parents, and love on your friends and siblings even when they drive you crazy. I promise, this is going to be the best year yet.

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I Grew Up As An Only Child And No, I Don't Wish I Had A Bunch Of Siblings

Because I didn't have siblings, my house became the gathering spot for me and my best friends. I always had a plus one. And that's how they became family.

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Being an only child almost always sparks an interesting conversation. Oftentimes people who are only children simply can't imagine having siblings and those with siblings can't imagine living in a pit of loneliness. What they don't know is that pit of loneliness isn't actually that lonely and involves a lot of quiet, self-exploration, and being the star of the family unit. Sounds like a party to me! I feel like whenever I tell people I'm an only child they give me a look of pity as if they are imagining me pacing a dark hallway during the Victorian era with a china doll as my only friend.

First of all, the hallway would have been very well lit because my mother is an interior decorator, but I digress. Whenever I tell people I'm an only child they automatically assume I am spoiled and think too highly of myself. I'm not saying they're totally wrong since I'm currently writing a self-indulgent article and expecting people to read it because they are sure to be intrigued by the fabulousness I've been radiating since day one.

Yes, my pink pastel childhood bedroom did house a canopy bed with faux roses strung about the top and a dollhouse my dad built for me (and installed electricity into). Yes, I had the super sweet 16 complete with a ballgown, tiara and matching pink Hummer Limo. But, I don't think being an only child made me spoiled. I got a lot of things but I never expected them. I worked hard in school even though there were no siblings to compete with. I think I am a pretty good sharer.

Now that I've introduced my only childless to you, I am going to tell you just how ~unique~ MY experience was. You're probably rolling your eyes, but I promise you might understand my life a little better after reading this (I am such an only child, why do I care if you understand my life?). I grew up in a one square mile town, walking school district, no stop light kinda deal. And I loved it. My friends became my family. They are still the family I choose today. I always had playmates because of the small size of my town. I especially needed them because I didn't have that childhood companionship with cousins either GASP

Yep, that's right folks. Not only was I an only child but I was also the only grandchild on both sides of my family. Which means I was also the only niece to all six of my aunts and uncles. I was always kind of bummed out that I didn't get that cousins-opening-presents-together-on-Christmas experience, but because of that, I am so close with my aunts, uncles, and grandparents, just like how not sharing my parents with siblings created my profound relationship with them.

As I got older, I realized I wouldn't be a real aunt until I got married. I am so close with my hometown friends that I am sure I will get to be a fake aunt to their kids, but it isn't the same as blood. I started to be curious about what my relationship would be like with my future younger cousins as every year ticked by without them.

As much as I dreamed about what it would be like when I finally had cousins, I never could have conceived of how much my relationships with them would shape me during my young adult years. When I was 14, my aunts who are twins were due one month apart and I went from having zero cousins to two in a blink of an eye. I couldn't contain my excitement. I felt all the feelings people tell you that you're supposed to feel, but even deeper. I didn't know how much I could instantly love someone or how overwhelmed with selflessness I could be. I didn't know how many things that I'd loved and experienced until I thought about sharing all those things with my Aedan and Daisy.

Three years later when I was 17, our family was blessed with another little girl, the sister to Daisy, Miss Lily. Since I am so much older than them, I feel like more of an aunt or mentor. They inspire me to give them something to look up to. It has been the most beautiful experience for me.

I think who you surround yourself with has a great influence on who you become. For me, I surround myself with my family and friends who are like family. As an aspiring writer, I am crafting an identity and I just don't see how I can express that if I don't give you a little taste of where I came from and the people who make me, me. They've taught me how to love and be loved so well. They're still teaching me things every single day.

When I think of all the people closest to me in my head, I picture every one of their faces meshing into a completed puzzle in my heart. That's really cheesy but I'm being real right now. And I guess my final point is this: I'm an only child but my heart holds a whole lot more than just me.

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