To Artists Everywhere, Please Don't Feel Discouraged

To Artists Everywhere, Please Don't Feel Discouraged

Create those ideas you've had for so long.

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I'm a self-proclaimed artist. I love writing, I love photography, I love watercolors and singing and filming. I adore everyone else's art and support their hard work and creativity. I love everything art and yet, I feel unmotivated when it comes to making my own art.

I keep telling myself I'll get to it, eventually! I keep telling myself, "this weekend! This weekend I'll finally start that project I've been playing with in my head." And the weekend comes and goes and that beautiful idea has yet to be created. I beat myself up over this and wonder how people have done so much and I've done so little. I compare the few things I've done to the magnificence of what others have completed.

By doing so, I become unmotivated. I don't wanna bring those ideas to life, I don't want to bother trying when so many other people are so much better at things than I am.

But lately, I've gotten into the groove of brushing those thoughts off.

Truth be told, I'm an amateur at everything artsy, and that's ok. Everyone starts somewhere, and for me think I need to be just as good as anyone else is insane. People have different styles and experience, and it doesn't make sense to compare an apple to an orange.

You are an apple, I am an orange. And that's okay!!

Artist, please don't feel unmotivated. Maybe there's a lot of things going on in your life and you just haven't had the time to do what you've been wanting to do. Maybe you're scared you won't be good at it. Maybe you feel lazy, or maybe you want to make that art, but you want to do it in private. All of that is okay.

The best things take time. If it takes you forever to draw that portrait, it's fine. If it's been years that you've had that idea for the film, that's cool too, just take your time and keep planning it out. Maybe you want to sing but you know your voice isn't like Beyoncé's. Totally cool. Just keep practicing and love the sound that you make.

What about the art that you keep tucked away? Do you think it's not special? It is! Even if your eyes are the only eyes to see it, I promise it still has value. Some things are meant for just you and some are meant for the world, but both are important.

It's time to stop doubting yourself and go for it. If you mess up, you learn from it and continue on. Don't be afraid to have sloppy drawings. Don't be afraid if your voice cracks or someone tells you they didn't like the script. It's okay if that video or that photo didn't come out the way you wanted it to. Make mistakes, and learn from them.

Art is not perfect, and it takes time. Some people will love it, others won't. The only thing that matters is that you, the artist, loves it. So, don't feel discouraged any longer. Write what you want to write, film what you want to film and paint what you want to paint.

All of those beautiful ideas in your head are just waiting to be created, so what are you waiting for?

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A Revival: Greek And Roman Impact On The Renaissance

How Renaissance artists departed from the Gothic style
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Just as the Romans were often known as Greek imitators, the artists of the Renaissance took a big interest in ancient Greek and Roman art. Therefore, the Renaissance came to be known as an era of revival, one in which the influence of Greek and Roman art was seen in both art and architecture. Pieces such as the Palazzo Rucellai, David, and Birth of Venus are all noted for being composed of both Greek and Roman elements and styles.

The Palazzo Rucellai stands as a landmark Renaissance palace, designed in 1446 by well-known Italian architects Leon Battista Alberti and Bernardo Rossellino. The humanistic influence of the 15th century is noted in its composition, but most importantly, the structural elements of ancient Rome are incorporated within the structure. The Roman-like arches, pilasters, and entablatures give the impression of strength. The pilasters are composed of Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian orders which are reminiscent of the Colosseum. Just as the pilasters of the Colosseum are used for a decorative purpose, the ones of the Palazzo Rucellai also depart from simply providing structural support.

The David sculpture was created by the notorious Donatello. Donatello was known for his studies of Greek and Roman art, which allowed for him to make a connection between the classical world and the Renaissance. The Greek formula for contrapposto is noted in this sculpture, as his weight appears to be mostly on the right foot while the left leg seems to be more relaxed. The Greek influence is also demonstrated as David is fully nude, which departs from the clothed Biblical figures of the Gothic era and instead resonates Greek conventions. Just as the Greek Kritios Boy is described as “the first beautiful nude in art,” the bronze David was the first freestanding nude of the Renaissance.

The Birth of Venus, created by Sandro Botticelli, also appears to carry Greek and Roman influences into the Renaissance era in which it was constructed. Just like the Roman marble Aphrodite of Menophantos, the Birth of Venus employs the Capitoline Venus pose in which Venus covers her breasts with her right arm and her groin with her left arm. An obvious allusion to Roman art is the use of the Roman goddess Venus as the subject of the painting. The use of classical subject matter is strategical as it appeals to the rich Florentines who patronized such pieces.

The Renaissance is known as the “rebirth” or “revival” of Greek and Roman styles and conventions. Such Greek and Roman influences are well noted in the Italian-made pieces such as The Palazzo Rucellai, which can be compared to the Colosseum, David, which can be compared to the Kritios Boy, and The Birth of Venus, which can be compared to the Aphrodite of Menophantos. It is this revival that is credited with helping European artists and architects depart from Gothic styles, among others, while bringing back notorious Greek and Roman ones.

Cover Image Credit: Artble

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You Should’ve Left Me: A Poem

You should leave me before it's too late.

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You should've left me the night you came home late,

The night I saw your texts with her and felt my love fade.

You should've left me when I asked if you loved me,

Instead of making me feel like you were too drunk to think clearly.

You should've left me when I cried on your shirt,

Instead of kissing me softly and telling me how you never meant to make me hurt.

You should've left me when I asked for a break,

Instead of crying and telling me how much you needed me to feel sane.

You should've left me when I stopped living in the moment with you,

Instead of trying to win me back with those sweet, sweet words that always seemed too good to be true.

You should've left me when I wouldn't stop using my phone,

Instead of assuming there wasn't another guy and you still were my comfort and home.

You should leave me before it's too late,

because I might just do what you did on that night that made my love fade.

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