I Can Be Conservative With A Small Set Of Liberal Beliefs

I Can Be A Conservative And Still Hold Liberal AND Moderate Beliefs

Being liberal and conservative is a real thing. I'm one.

269
views

Being a young conservative mind is one thing, but when you promote conservative values and then publicly disagree with something that is Republican/conservative based; you inevitably end up getting bashed for it.

First and foremost, I have always supported President Trump. This does not mean that I have to agree with everything he says. I refuse to be brainwashed and sheep-like. I have my own set of values, and I stand for what is right and best for this country.

Now you're thinking "well, then that's not conservative." Definitionally, conservative means "holding to traditional attitudes and values and cautious about change or innovation, typically in relation to politics or religion." The key word in this definition is "cautious."

I am cautious about change, and being non-supportive of things like the attempt(s) to overturn Roe V. Wade is something I am extremely wary of.

Those beliefs do not make someone less conservative, less Christian, or less of a person.

I still believe in tradition. I support the death penalty in certain cases. I believe that oil and gas are good resources for energy, although we must be aware of how much we use as well as the research being done that will help us find more environmentally friendly ways to use/produce energy. I'm against physician-assisted suicide unless they are set to die with no chance to live. The second amendment is something that I will always protect. With the way the government is being currently running, I think it is important for us to remember that we do have the right of revolution if it comes down to that. Homeland security is very important, and it needs to be conducted in any way that promotes safety. I think that taxes should be lowered and that the government shouldn't take huge chunks of money from Americans. Private property is private property, the government has no right to seize it or use it in any way (unless, for some reason, the third Amendment came into play.)

I also have a small set of liberal beliefs.

Global warming is real.

Immigrants should be able to legally enter the country, and we should make the immigration process quicker and easier for people that want to come to the USA for a better life.

Separation of the church and state is necessary, and it should not be expressed in the government especially to make decisions. There are many different religions in the United States, meaning we cannot force one certain religion on the people.

Same-sex marriage should not be an issue because it does not have an impact on anyone's personal lives, besides the people that get married. It also doesn't pose any long or short term negative effects.

Aside from those beliefs, I have a set of beliefs that lay somewhere in the middle.

I support the welfare system but I also think that people should have to go through a set of "self-help" actions to slowly gear themselves away from being dependent on welfare.

I do not think we should go to war, but I do think it is important to do whatever we have to do to keep terrorism out of the United States; even if that means going to war.

Social security is important and we need to do what we can to mend it, but we cannot put our economy at an even higher risk than it already is to do so.

If you are happy, and your decisions do not have an impact on my life, then I'm happy and I will gladly mind my own business. As long as our economy, safety, and personal lives are not infringed upon; new sets of laws should be allowed.

The local/state government should not have such a power to dramatically go against federal law or threaten the constitution. There is nothing stopping them from doing this because they (state) find loopholes in the fine lines. We the people can put a stop to this, and we can use one of our greatest rights; the right to vote.

Popular Right Now

To The Girl Struggling With Her Body Image

It's not about the size of your jeans, but the size of your heart, soul, and spirit.

712302
views

To the girl struggling with her body image,

You are more than the number on the scale. You are more than the number on your jeans and dresses. You are way more than the number of pounds you've gained or lost in whatever amount of time.

Weight is defined as the quantity of matter contained by a body or object. Weight does not define your self-worth, ambition or potential.

So many girls strive for validation through the various numbers associated with body image and it's really so sad seeing such beautiful, incredible women become discouraged over a few numbers that don't measure anything of true significance.

Yes, it is important to live a healthy lifestyle. Yes, it is important to take care of yourself. However, taking care of yourself includes your mental health as well. Neglecting either your mental or physical health will inflict problems on the other. It's very easy to get caught up in the idea that you're too heavy or too thin, which results in you possibly mistreating your body in some way.

Your body is your special, beautiful temple. It harbors all of your thoughts, feelings, characteristics, and ideas. Without it, you wouldn't be you. If you so wish to change it in a healthy way, then, by all means, go ahead. With that being said, don't make changes to impress or please someone else. You are the only person who is in charge of your body. No one else has the right to tell you whether or not your body is good enough. If you don't satisfy their standards, then you don't need that sort of negative influence in your life. That sort of manipulation and control is extremely unhealthy in its own regard.

Do not hold back on things you love or want to do because of how you interpret your body. You are enough. You are more than enough. You are more than your exterior. You are your inner being, your spirit. A smile and confidence are the most beautiful things you can wear.

It's not about the size of your jeans. It's about the size of your mind and heart. Embrace your body, observe and adore every curve, bone and stretch mark. Wear what makes you feel happy and comfortable in your own skin. Do your hair and makeup (or don't do either) to your heart's desire. Wear the crop top you've been eyeing up in that store window. Want a bikini body? Put a bikini on your body, simple.

So, as hard as it may seem sometimes, understand that the number on the scale doesn't measure the amount or significance of your contributions to this world. Just because that dress doesn't fit you like you had hoped doesn't mean that you're any less of a person.

Love your body, and your body will love you right back.

Cover Image Credit: Lauren Margliotti

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy's Assault On The Second Amendment Will Hit Marginalized Groups The Most

The second amendment is under attack in New Jersey, and the state's low-income, black, and Hispanic communities have the most to lose.

88
views

The second amendment, or the right to "keep and bear arms," is the hallmark of freedom here in the United States. The existence of the second amendment is what preserves the first amendment. This constitutional recognition of the right to bear arms is based on the inherent human right of self-preservation. Without it, Americans have no defense against tyranny. This right was recognized by the founders for a reason, and infringing upon it would prompt history to repeat itself.

New Jersey, according to a study conducted between 2005 and 2011, is in the top 10 states with the most restrictive gun laws. Governor Phil Murphy, however, does not think this is enough. He now wants to effectively restrict gun ownership to only wealthy individuals.

Here is a brief walkthrough of the path to gun ownership in New Jersey: The process to apply for, purchase, and legally own a firearm in New Jersey is arguably already infringing upon the rights of citizens. This process begins with an application to your local police department. The requirements outlined in N.J.A.C. 13:54-1.5 are broad and leave room for discriminatory discretion.

It is then required to complete an STS-33 form, be fingerprinted, and consent to a release of your mental health records. You must also provide two references, who vouch for character and that your application reflects the truth. Upon completion and acceptance, a Firearms Purchaser's ID will be issued. This is supposed to be issued within 30 days following acceptance, however, it has been reported to take longer, even up to six months on some occasions. If you wish to purchase a handgun, you must complete a separate application. You must also be over the age of 21. You may only purchase one handgun per month, and each handgun must have its own permit as well.

Upon receipt of a Firearms Purchaser's ID, the next step takes place at the firearm retailer. You are required to fill out an ATF form and be subject to a background check through NJ NICS. Results following the background check may take up to two extra weeks.

For comparison, the national background check used in many other states yields results in about 20 minutes.

As if these weren't enough, in order to purchase ammunition — a rather normal additional purchase — you're required to present a driver's license. Separately, to purchase ammunition for a handgun, you must either present a driver's license or copy of Handgun Purchaser's ID.

(It should be noted that the same people who denounce the requirement of a driver's license or ID to vote as "racist" support the enforcement of such a requirement for another constitutional right. This argument is inconsistent. An ID must be furnished in order to show that one is legally able to purchase a firearm or ammunition, just like it must be furnished in order to vote.)

The above mentioned are the current hoops that aspiring gun owners must jump through, simply to express a right which is supposed to be protected.

We've covered what this process costs in amounts of time, but now we move on to costs in money — and what Governor Phil Murphy wants to do to raise it. Depending on where you live, the average cost of a handgun is between 500-600 dollars. On top of that, ammunition is between 100-200 dollars. For reference, this is more than I pay in monthly rent for my house.

Despite these hefty costs that gun owners already face, Governor Murphy doesn't think it's enough. He wants legal gun owners to pay up to 2,000% more in permit and carrying fees. There is no explanation for this, besides making it more difficult for citizens to access their constitutional right.

Would it be OK to charge $100 in order to vote? Of course not.

Large fees do not curb gun violence. They forcibly curb legal gun ownership, and they place an undue burden on citizens in lower economic classes, who happen to be disproportionately minorities.

Currently, A firearm identification card costs $5, while a permit to own a firearm is $2. A permit to carry a gun costs $20. These are reasonable prices that citizens of every socioeconomic class can feasibly afford. Under Governor Murphy's proposal, "An identification card would cost $100, an owner's permit would be $50 and a carry permit $400." These, however, are not something everyone, who can otherwise legally purchase a firearm, can afford. This is discrimination.

Not only is Murphy's proposal classist, but it is indirectly racially discriminatory.

In 2017, New Jersey reported that the poverty rates among both black and Hispanic families were more than double the rate of poverty among white families. Because of Murphy's proposal, these groups will be less likely to be capable of affording something that is a protected and guaranteed right.

In a city like Newark, black and Hispanic citizens make up about 73% of the population. In 2017, the poverty rate for the city was 28.3%. Compare this to New Jersey's overall 10.4% poverty rate in the same year. The rate of violent crime in Newark is more than triple that of New Jersey overall.

In fact, New Jersey's top three cities with the largest populations are all more than half minority. All three have higher crime rates than New Jersey overall. Last but not least, all three have higher poverty rates than the state average.

It should be clear that Murphy's proposals discriminate against lower-income individuals. Minorities, like black and Hispanic families, are more likely to experience poverty than white families. Minorities also make up more of the population in New Jersey cities. These cities have much higher crime rates than more suburban and rural areas of the state. Minorities, because of this, are more often at risk of danger and crime and could benefit from being allowed to express their constitutional right to protection.

The people who need access to firearms for protection arguably the most are being unfairly restricted based on class and, indirectly, race. The rights of law-abiding citizens are being infringed, and we must fight against it.

Related Content

Facebook Comments