Projection And The Conservative Snowflake

Projection And The Conservative Snowflake

The new liberal 'snowflake' phenomenon owes its origin to decades of conservative outrage.
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Ad hominem attacks and cleverly-constructed insults are a perennial part of political discourse in this country. In recent years though, the attacks haven’t been quite as articulate as they used to be. While some insults, like being called a ‘cuck’ because I think ‘the God Emperor’ is a moron, can be entertaining; some of them are just weak, chief among them being the term ‘snowflake’. It’s an insult that derives mainly from the behavior of a fringe group of college students that have made it their goal in life to be offended over every little thing: claiming cafeteria lunches are cultural appropriation, calling people bigoted for not recognizing the 2,000-and-growing list of gender pronouns, etc. This term has taken on a wider meaning, used in the context of people who generally support the principle of political correctness. It’s not difficult to attack the fringes; any mindless buffoon with a microphone can do it- ask Tomi Lahren and Milo Yiannopoulos. But conservatives have delighted themselves so much in attacking the safe-space-dwelling liberal snowflakes that they’ve forgotten one thing; they started this phenomenon.

Conservatives practically have a monopoly on getting offended over the most trivial nonsense. Remember the time people lost their ever-loving minds because Starbucks announced they would begin a program to hire 10,000 refugees? They fumed about how they should hire 10,000 veterans instead: though they couldn’t be bothered to do a Google search which would show that they’re already doing that exact thing. But that’s only one example.

The Super Bowl has its share of political ads. This year, some touched on the immigration issue with subtlety, while some just outright went straight to the point about the wall being an un-American idea. A few years ago, one ad that really ruffled feathers was a Coca-Cola ad that showed “America the Beautiful” being sung in several different languages. It’s a nice ad that shows the multicultural diversity of the United States and our immigrant heritage. Predictably, there was a wave of fake outrage from the right, as if a song being sung in a language other than English (or in Sarah Palin’s deluded world, in ‘American’) were going to tear apart the fabric of democracy.

This is a common phenomenon. Here's an experiment: next time a corporation shows an ad on TV that portrays a gay or lesbian couple, go on social media. Take a look at how many conservatives are screaming (likely in all caps) and calling to boycott a continually-growing list of companies. One example was a promotional campaign done by Doritos, where a certain amount of its revenue would go to the It Gets Better project, an organization founded by columnist Dan Savage to prevent LGBT youth suicide. Conservatives screeched. A gay couple in a Wells Fargo ad? How dare they!

The last examples, although annoying, are relatively harmless (unless you consider the minor economic losses from a short-lived boycott). Some conservative-outrage storms, however, do have some real consequences. While it is one of the most verifiable concepts in science and serving as the backbone of modern biology, the theory of evolution is something that gets under the skin of a lot of conservatives. Despite the fact that humans share around 98% of our DNA with chimpanzees, many conservatives have made it a goal to try and undermine evolution in public schools. If that doesn’t work, they try to shoe-horn their own ideas into the classroom, even though they are not scientific, don’t hold up to peer-review, and don't hold up in a court of law. Like the consensus on anthropogenic climate change, evolution shares practically universal scientific consensus; yet many conservatives do everything they can to undermine the process of science, simply because they don’t like the results.

This is all worth remembering when people like Tomi Lahren trot out the meme that liberals are just whiny babies. Or when Dana Perino unironically states that conservatives are driven by facts and logic, while liberals are driven by feelings. Conservatives have perfected the act of fake outrage like a fine art, an art form that only recently have liberals picked up on. And you know what they say, the best form of flattery is imitation.

Cover Image Credit: Huffington Post

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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Irish-American History Is Just As Important As Any Other Culture, You Can't Prove Me Wrong

I cherish being Irish and I will not let anyone let me feel bad for that.

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Depending on when you're reading this, Saint Patrick's day has either just passed or is around the corner. For me, Saint Patrick's day is tomorrow. I've been debating this article for some time now because I didn't know how it would be perceived. At this point, though, I feel it's important for me to get out. No, Irish people were never kept as slaves in America, and I will never be one to try and say they were. However, Irish people were treated tremendously awful in America. A lot of people tend to forget, or just try to erase entirely, the history of the Irish in America. So much so that I felt shameful for wanting to celebrate my heritage. Therefore, I want to bring to light the history that everyone brushes under the rug.

In 1845, a potato famine broke out across Ireland. This was a big deal because the Irish lived off, mainly, potatoes. They were cheap, easy to grow, and had tons of nutrients. So when the famine struck, many people either died of starvation or fled to America in seek of refuge. When the Irish arrived in America they were seen as a threat to the decency of America. People viewed them as drunk beasts, sinful savages, barbaric, violent, belligerent, stupid, and white apes. When the Irish would go to look for jobs, many times they found signs that read "Irish Need Not Apply," even when the job was hiring. Therefore, the Irish did the jobs no one wanted, and even jobs African slaves wouldn't do. The biggest example of this is when Irishmen built canals and drained swamps. They were sent to do these things because of the enormous amount of mosquitoes; in the swamp, they would get bit and ultimately die of malaria.

Also, during this time, Irish people were poor and therefore lived in the same neighborhoods as the free African Americans. A lot of the Irish people were friendly with their neighbors of color and even got into interracial relationships. Because the Irish lived in these neighborhoods they were seen as dirty and even a lot of people at this time put African Americans higher on the totem pole than Irish. One person during the time even said, "At least the black families keep their homes clean."

The main reason American's outlook on Irish people changed was that most Irishmen took up fighting for the Union in the Civil War. I make this argument, not because I think the Irish suffered more than African slaves. I don't say this in means of trying to erase the struggles of the African slaves. I do not think that any of our ancestors should have been treated the way they were. I mean to say that the Irish did in fact suffer. Irish people were treated wrongly on the basis of...nothing. Simply because my ancestors hailed from the shores of Eire, they were treated with malice. And I write this simply because I want people to remember. I want people to understand what happened.

On Saint Patrick's Day this year, next year, and for the many years to come, I want people to embrace the Irish culture. I want the folks of Irish heritage to not be ashamed of where they come from; to not be ashamed to share their culture the way I have for many years. I want everyone to have a beer, wear some green, eat a potato or two, and dance the Irish step; to celebrate the history of Irish people with a bit more understanding than before.

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