15 signs you know you chose the right school

15 signs you know you chose the right school

15. It just somehow feels right.

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After my first year at USC, I can honestly say that I made the right choice in sending my admission* deposit May 1st. This is especially because USC was one of those schools that I almost didn't apply to. Even though it was one of my dream schools, I was almost positive I wouldn't get accepted-- so pretty much me leading to sending in my application the night before… I happy to say though, not only was a pleasantly surprised when I got my acceptance letter, but I chose to attend USC (obviously)!

If you read one of my past articles, I mentioned how I am still in slight disbelief and am a bit anxious in terms of attending this school. A Lot of people go through this. There are countless articles on reasons you should transfer to another college or how your current college is not the right fit for you. Like yes, this is another aspect that a lot of students go through, but let's also focus on validating students who feel self-conscious in terms of what got them into their said school.

So if you're feeling anxious that you're not good enough for your attending university, focus on the reasons why you fit into this school. Listen, you got accepted, you made it past the hard part. If the admission advisors singled you out as a individual they want at there school, there must be a reason for that.

If you're still feeling unsure, here are 15 signs that you current school is the right fit for you.

1. You don't know how you got in

Even though you don't know how you got in, the admission advisors most certainly do. Don't fret this though, simply be in amazement that you got into such a great school.

2. The people that you meet are ones that you would have never have met anywhere else

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These people come from all over the country, even from different regions of the world, each of them with such unique backgrounds, thoughts and ideas. How crazy is it that you can just meet someone you probably would never have met anywhere else!

3. You’ve instantly found the perfect extracurriculars

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And they're not just extracurriculars for your resume. You actually enjoy spending weekends or after class hours going to these extracurriculars

4. You miss it during the summer

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Although you're having a great time sleeping in and not having to wake up to 8 am classes… you still kind of miss not only the friends you made, but also just being a student at your college.

5. You wear school gear

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Literally, even if it's just a lanyard or mug. Even if you got it for free, you're still filled with a sort of pride using it.

6. You have the perfect major/potential major

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From the beginning, even if you weren't sure what you wanted to major in, you still had so many options. In my experience, I came in as a pre-law student, changed to a pre-med with a human bio emphasis, to adding a major of art history to now possibly going into journalism (I know, I am very indecisive). No matter how many times you changed your major, you're positive your school has the right program for you.

7. It’s the perfect climate for you

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No more dreading certain months of the year due to undesired weather. For me (someone who loves the sun and warm weather), Los Angeles weather is perfect.

8. Your financial burden isn’t too bad

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One of the key factors in deciding which college you attend. If you're comfortable (or more like, your parents are comfortable) with the amount, then yes it is a good fit! A good tip for those still deciding whether an out-of-state college is worth it-- if you're roughly going to pay the same tuition as your in-state college, then go for it. The out-of-state college experience is worth it and something you won't regret.

9. Your campus is aesthetically pleasing

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Most spots on campus are Instagram-worthy? Then yes, instant checkmark on whether this school is right for you. (Yes and the background on that GIF is USC)

10. You’re academically challenged

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You should be feeling that college is harder than high school. If not, then what was the point of all those AP/Honors/IB classes?

11. You’re comfortable in the classroom setting

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But don't feel like you have to be overly challenged with the academic setting to the point where you have a mental breakdown or end up getting subpar grades. Be challenged, but be comfortable in your classroom setting-- work it out with your professor, advisors, etc. You're at this university to succeed and that's the only thing that anyone wants.

12. You can go on-and-on about your college

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To which your friends and family probably get tired of. From ranting about professors to gossiping about the recently resigned school official or even bragging about your school, you somehow find a way to make the conversation about your university.

13. You make a list of plans of what to do on the weekend (when you not it’s not midterm/final season)

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Besides finals/midterm season, you're never bored at your school. There is always something to do-- from exploring the neighboring city/town to activities held at your college, there is never a boring day.

14. You’re constantly recommending people to transfer/apply to your university

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Literally, you think anyone would like your school (because honestly who wouldn't?) to the point that you constantly want to recommend everyone to apply.

15. It just somehow feels right.

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There's just that feeling that you can't explain, but you know that you belong at this college. Maybe it took a couple of months, or a whole year, but you honestly can't imagine yourself anywhere else.

Cover Image Credit:

Bohao Zhao

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Getting Straight A's In College Is Not Worth Failing Your Mental Health

A's are nice, but you are more than a letter.

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The idea of getting an A on every paper, every exam, every assignment, seems great. It can be known as a reassurance of our hard work and dedication to our 4+ classes we attend every single day.

Losing sleep, skipping meals, forgetting to drink water, skipping out on time with friends and family; these are the things that can occur when your letter of an A is what you are living for.

You are worth more than the grade letter, or the GPA number on your transcript.

Listen, don't get me wrong, getting A's and B's definitely is something to feel accomplished for. It is the approval that you did it, you completed your class, and your hard work paid off.

But honey, get some sleep.

Don't lose yourself, don't forget who you are. Grades are important, but the true measurement of self-worth and accomplishment is that you tried your best.

Trying your best, and working hard for your goals is something that is A-worthy.

Reserve time for yourself, for your sanity, your health, your mental health.

At the end of the day, grades might look nice on a piece of paper, but who you are and how you represent yourself can be even more honorable.

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The Real Reason Millennials Seem So Indecisive To Old Folks' Untrained Eyes

Because the old people don't understand.

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So, it's 2018, right? But for whatever reason, older people still think we're supposed to stay in one job that we don't even like until we die because "it's the right thing to do." How can something that isn't stimulating, or mentally or physically fulfilling be the right thing to do in any situation?

Also, if a job isn't paying you nearly enough, go find another one. Education is expensive and you should be paid what you're worth. The degree you paid for should earn you a decent salary.

The fact that you have to have a degree to do most jobs now is something older generations don't understand. Before, you could just drop out of school at like 16 and find work. Now, sometimes a bachelors degree isn't enough! And they don't get that struggle.

Getting into college used to be much less competitive. You basically got to choose where you wanted to go, not the other way around. Also, you could go through four years of college for what one semester costs nowadays. As I said, going to college for older people wasn't a priority, for us, it's a necessity.

Employers also usually hate people who have had "too many" jobs in a short period of time, but they don't know where you worked before. Maybe it was a terrible work environment and you didn't feel needed or safe there. Maybe you had to move for financial reasons. There are a lot of reasons people leave jobs. And I would think employers would be more impressed that a person can find multiple jobs and get hired rather than being upset because they keep leaving.

Another thing older people think is that millennials are lazy and just use their phones all the time. But in high school, older people could slack off, didn't have to go to college, would still be fine, and didn't have any technology.

Now we have AP, IB, and dual credit classes, GPA's stress students out, applying for college and getting accepted is a whole show. Getting through college is stressful; finding internships, making sure you can afford all the things, applying for scholarships. Finally, you graduate and get your degree only to not be guaranteed a job. Not to mention stress about student loans, living arrangements, and the list goes on. But sure we're lazy.

Also, a lot of teenagers now and when I was in high school don't have jobs in high school because after the whole recession happened, older people started taking those jobs when they lost their high-paying ones. Also, basically every job wants experience now, but you can't gain experience if no one will hire you. So, don't call us lazy for not taking jobs that you stole from us.

And... we have to know how to work all technology?

Use social media for most jobs?

And fix phones for old people but we're on our phones too much?

Interesting that you say that... I think we deserve to be on our phones after the stress of high school, college and trying to find a job that pays us enough to cover the cost of a place to live, food, gas, a car and more.

I'm not trying to say that there's anything wrong with the way things were done before. I'm just saying that millennials deserve a little more respect than they get from older generations.

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