15 signs you know you chose the right school

15 signs you know you chose the right school

15. It just somehow feels right.

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After my first year at USC, I can honestly say that I made the right choice in sending my admission* deposit May 1st. This is especially because USC was one of those schools that I almost didn't apply to. Even though it was one of my dream schools, I was almost positive I wouldn't get accepted-- so pretty much me leading to sending in my application the night before… I happy to say though, not only was a pleasantly surprised when I got my acceptance letter, but I chose to attend USC (obviously)!

If you read one of my past articles, I mentioned how I am still in slight disbelief and am a bit anxious in terms of attending this school. A Lot of people go through this. There are countless articles on reasons you should transfer to another college or how your current college is not the right fit for you. Like yes, this is another aspect that a lot of students go through, but let's also focus on validating students who feel self-conscious in terms of what got them into their said school.

So if you're feeling anxious that you're not good enough for your attending university, focus on the reasons why you fit into this school. Listen, you got accepted, you made it past the hard part. If the admission advisors singled you out as a individual they want at there school, there must be a reason for that.

If you're still feeling unsure, here are 15 signs that you current school is the right fit for you.

1. You don't know how you got in

Even though you don't know how you got in, the admission advisors most certainly do. Don't fret this though, simply be in amazement that you got into such a great school.

2. The people that you meet are ones that you would have never have met anywhere else

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These people come from all over the country, even from different regions of the world, each of them with such unique backgrounds, thoughts and ideas. How crazy is it that you can just meet someone you probably would never have met anywhere else!

3. You’ve instantly found the perfect extracurriculars

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And they're not just extracurriculars for your resume. You actually enjoy spending weekends or after class hours going to these extracurriculars

4. You miss it during the summer

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Although you're having a great time sleeping in and not having to wake up to 8 am classes… you still kind of miss not only the friends you made, but also just being a student at your college.

5. You wear school gear

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Literally, even if it's just a lanyard or mug. Even if you got it for free, you're still filled with a sort of pride using it.

6. You have the perfect major/potential major

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From the beginning, even if you weren't sure what you wanted to major in, you still had so many options. In my experience, I came in as a pre-law student, changed to a pre-med with a human bio emphasis, to adding a major of art history to now possibly going into journalism (I know, I am very indecisive). No matter how many times you changed your major, you're positive your school has the right program for you.

7. It’s the perfect climate for you

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No more dreading certain months of the year due to undesired weather. For me (someone who loves the sun and warm weather), Los Angeles weather is perfect.

8. Your financial burden isn’t too bad

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One of the key factors in deciding which college you attend. If you're comfortable (or more like, your parents are comfortable) with the amount, then yes it is a good fit! A good tip for those still deciding whether an out-of-state college is worth it-- if you're roughly going to pay the same tuition as your in-state college, then go for it. The out-of-state college experience is worth it and something you won't regret.

9. Your campus is aesthetically pleasing

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Most spots on campus are Instagram-worthy? Then yes, instant checkmark on whether this school is right for you. (Yes and the background on that GIF is USC)

10. You’re academically challenged

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You should be feeling that college is harder than high school. If not, then what was the point of all those AP/Honors/IB classes?

11. You’re comfortable in the classroom setting

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But don't feel like you have to be overly challenged with the academic setting to the point where you have a mental breakdown or end up getting subpar grades. Be challenged, but be comfortable in your classroom setting-- work it out with your professor, advisors, etc. You're at this university to succeed and that's the only thing that anyone wants.

12. You can go on-and-on about your college

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To which your friends and family probably get tired of. From ranting about professors to gossiping about the recently resigned school official or even bragging about your school, you somehow find a way to make the conversation about your university.

13. You make a list of plans of what to do on the weekend (when you not it’s not midterm/final season)

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Besides finals/midterm season, you're never bored at your school. There is always something to do-- from exploring the neighboring city/town to activities held at your college, there is never a boring day.

14. You’re constantly recommending people to transfer/apply to your university

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Literally, you think anyone would like your school (because honestly who wouldn't?) to the point that you constantly want to recommend everyone to apply.

15. It just somehow feels right.

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There's just that feeling that you can't explain, but you know that you belong at this college. Maybe it took a couple of months, or a whole year, but you honestly can't imagine yourself anywhere else.

Cover Image Credit:

Bohao Zhao

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To All Incoming Freshmen, When You Get To College, Please Don't Be THAT Freshman

I am pretty sure we all know who I'm talking about.

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As we are all counting down the days to return to campus, students are looking forward to meeting new people and reuniting with old friends. And then, there is the freshman.

We have all been there. The eagerness and excitement have been slowly building up through months of summer vacation, all waiting for this moment. I understand the anxiousness, enthusiasm, and insecurities. The opportunity to meet new people and explore a new area is very intriguing. But let's be real, you are here to make memories and get an education. So here are a few pieces of advice from a former college freshman.

1. Don't be that freshman who follows their significant other to college

This is the boy or girl who simply can not think for themselves. The 17-year-old puts their own personal goals and interests aside to sacrifice for a six-month high school relationship. This will more than likely end at an end of semester transfer after the relationship has been tested for a month or two in college life. So if you want to really enjoy your freshman year, make your own decisions and do what is best for you.

2. Don't be that freshman who lets their parents pick their major

"You are not going to school just to waste my money."

This is a statement you might have heard from your parents. As true as it might seem, this is definitely not a good way to start your college years. If you are not majoring in something you can see yourself doing, you are wasting your time. You can major in biology, go to medical school, and make the best grades. But if deep down you don't want to be a doctor, you will NOT end up being a good doctor. When it comes to picking your major, you really have to follow your heart.

3. Don't be that freshman who gets overwhelmed with the first taste of freedom

Yes. It is all very exciting. You don't have a curfew, you don't have rules, you don't have anyone constantly nagging you, but let's not get carried away. Don't be the freshman who gets a tattoo on the first night of living on your own. Don't be the freshman who tries to drink every liquor behind the bar. Don't be the freshman who gets caught up being someone that they aren't. My best advice would be to take things slow.

4. Don't be that freshman who starts school isolated in a relationship

I'm not telling you not to date anyone during your freshman year. I am saying to not cut yourself off from the rest of the world while you date someone. Your first year on campus is such an amazing opportunity to meet people, but people are constantly eager to start dating someone and then only spend time with that person.

Be the freshman who can manage time between friends and relationships.

5. Don't be that freshman who can't handle things on their own

It is your first year on your own. Yes, you still need help from your parents. But at this point, they should not be ordering your textbooks or buying your parking pass. If you need something for a club or for class, YOU should handle it. If you're having roommate problems, YOU should handle it, not your parents. This is the real world and college is a great time for you to start building up to be the person you want to be in the future, but you can't successfully do that if your parents still deal with every minor inconvenience for you.

6. Don't be that freshman who only talks to their high school friends

I know your high school was probably amazing, and you probably had the coolest people go there. However, I believe that college is a great time to be on your own and experience new things. Meeting new people and going to new places will allow you to grow into a more mature person. There is a way to balance meeting new friends and maintaining friendships with childhood friends, and I am sure you will find that balance.

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The Key To Self-Improvement: Moderation

Short-term solutions will never work for long-term problems.

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There's a famous quote that always seems to resurface in Instagram bios and yearbooks: "God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference." It's a popular quote for a reason: it summarizes the idea of autonomy and accepting responsibility for our own shortcomings and successes quite nicely.

I think recognizing our own ability to shape our lives is vital to becoming successful adults—but that recognition can quickly become an obsession.

Of course, we all should aim to change the things we don't want to accept in our lives: but that is much easier said than done. It is so very, very easy to get wrapped up in the idea of self-improvement—and that can lead to some serious burn-out.

I have been trying for what feels like forever to find a lifestyle that helps me deal with various issues stemming from low self-esteem and anxiety.

I feel like I've tried it all: dietary adjustments, different exercises, journaling, social media breaks, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. None of it seemed to have the lasting impact I was looking for.

For the first time in my life, the lifestyle changes I'm attempting are working—and I think I know why.

One reason: moderation.

None of those lifestyle changes mentioned above is inherently bad or difficult. However, any time I have attempted to keep myself to a strict regiment of utilizing them, it's quickly fizzled out.

If I attempted to journal every night, for example, I would get upset with myself for missing one evening if I was exceptionally tired. Whenever I tried to abruptly change my eating habits, I would do really well for a couple of weeks before giving up altogether. The same would happen if I tried to run every day or give up social media.

I put so much pressure on myself to improve some area of my life quickly that every minor trip-up or break felt like a failure.

What I've been doing recently, however, is spacing out those changes. I'll run three or four times a week instead of every day. I try to eat healthy meals but I won't always skip dessert. I limit the time I spend online but I won't quit it altogether.

By giving myself some breathing room, it allows my body and mind time to adjust. Those lifestyle changes don't feel restrictive any more. By enjoying certain things occasionally instead of never, I don't find myself craving them.

Giving yourself an adjustment period is vital to making any major change last. Trust me on this one: short-term solutions will never fix a long-term problem.

While that quote is nice, I'd like to propose a minor addition to it: "God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference. Oh yeah—and the time to make it happen."

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