Canada trip for an Indian wedding, best time of my life.

Canada Trip: Punjabi Wedding: Best Time Of My Life

If you know anything about Indian culture, you should know that weddings are for a week long and yes you have many events to attend.

481
views

I've always loved and appreciated my culture for many things. It makes me be unique and be myself for my culture. Out of the many things that make me love my culture, it is the wedding ceremonies, the dresses, and the little things that make the culture even better. Over Thanksgiving break, my cousin from Canada got married and of course, I went. The week was filled with many events almost every day. They had their engagement on Sunday which a couple of days before I went there. But I didn't miss much. This whole article is to my culture, my journey to Canada, and how awesome Indian/Punjabi weddings are.

Crossing the border, pretty scary moment.

Rumnik Ghuman

This was a really scary moment since the border police are very harsh and can be very rude. This was haunting me because a full Indian family was going to Canada for a week-long wedding and I guess that's not normal. But I was really calm as the view before the border was so beautiful. The Ambassadors Bridge is pretty old, but its gorgeous with all of the water beneath it and being able to see the city of Detriot just from the bridge was amazing.

Henna or Mehndi, you choose what to call it!

Personal Picture

According to Difference Between, Henna or Mehndi is a plant, a dye, and a tattoo. In Indian weddings, we apply Mehndi on the bride and all the girls from both sides for the celebration of the wedding. You leave the Mehndi on until it is Punjabi and it starts falling off. You can apply a mixture of lime and sugar to have a darker color the next day. But the number 1 rule in order to get really dark mehndi is to not wash your hands with water, no water for the whole day. The next day you can use all the water you want but not the day of the mehndi is applied to you.

Jaggo: a tradition Ceremony in a Punjabi Wedding

Yellow Pony Production

Jaggo is a traditional ceremony at a Punjabi wedding. This a ceremony where the whole family goes around in the village if this was in India. We carry a basket or more a jug on our head and we rotate this jug with many of family members head. We dance all night, this ceremony does happen at night.

Rangoli, colored powder used to make a design.

Rumnik Ghuman

Rangoli is a tradition where you make a design with these colored powders and this piece of art is going to be in front of the groom or bride at the ceremony Meya. This is when we put a mixture of turmeric and flour on the groom and bride. Apparently, the mixture makes the grooms and bride skin glow and brightens up as turmeric is very healthy for your skin.

Fooooood, sweeeeets, and getting faaaaaaat!

Rumnik Ghuman

The food is probably the third or second reason why I go to weddings because there's so much to eat like its pretty amazing. At the wedding house, there was a whole section of the kitchen that was dedicated to sweets so whenever you would go into the kitchen you were for sure tempted to eat something, which was not good for my weight. But I ignored my weight and eat everything and enjoyed every bit of it. Canada has the best service for Indian food like my mom makes amazing Indian food, but Canada was amazing, it wasn't too spicy nor too sweet it was a perfect taste.

Dressing up, the second best thing about wedding!

Personal Picture

Dressing up is my favorite thing do to. It just makes me happy and feel better. I love my culture's dresses as they are so beautiful. Most people will not agree with me but I always get simple Indian dresses so my suits are so comfortable and I feel better. I'm a very simple person, I don't even wear makeup because it's not me and I just don't feel myself. I do wear jewelry which is rings, earrings, and bracelets, that's it. Simplicity is the key to life, not too extra, but not basic.

Lava: the actual wedding ceremony at the Gurudwara

Rumnik Ghuman

The actual wedding day and ceremony takes place at the temple or gurudwara. This is where the groom and bride take 4 lava where the groom followed by the bride walk around the Holy book of Sikhism and make a promise to protect, support, love, and respect each other. This can be very emotional as the bride's parents are giving their daughter away as this is a tradition. But this officially is the wedding. I'm actually shocked that it didn't really snow a lot and the weather was great the whole week, but it did rain the day of the wedding and I've heard that this is actually a good sign and that the marriage will last forever.

Family time, of course!

Personal Picture

Out of all of the events, the most fun moment was to see my cousins after 6 years! This was a great time to catch up and they realize that I actually go to college now, not high school. I can't explain how many of times they ask so what class are you in now? I am the youngest from both side of the family, from my mom and dad's, but that doesn't mean I'm the baby.

Dancing is my number one favorite thing to do.

Rumnik Ghuman

This is the most blurry picture because I had to screenshot this from a video to express my love for dance. The final celebration moment was the reception, this is where we danced all the way to 1 am. We weren't even tired, it was the best time. As the USA people were the last ones to leave the dance floor, which shows Punjabi Americans really love to party.

The car drive back home.....

Rumnik Ghuman

The drive back home was the longest. I don't know why but it was not fun and we really didn't want to leave the happy atmosphere. I know I went to a wedding, but every time I go out of state, I tend to realize how much I love seeing new places, meeting new people, and experience the different cultures. When I came back, I was motivated to reach my dream job which allows me to travel the world and experience the multiple cultures of this world. There's a lot to see in this world and I only have one life to see it.

Popular Right Now

To The Dad Who Didn't Want Me, It's Mutual Now

Thank you for leaving me because I am happy.
922652
views

Thank you, for leaving me.

Thank you, for leaving me when I was little.

Thank you, for not putting me through the pain of watching you leave.

Thank you, for leaving me with the best mother a daughter could ask for.

I no longer resent you. I no longer feel anger towards you. I wondered for so long who I was. I thought that because I didn't know half of my blood that I was somehow missing something. I thought that who you were defined me. I was wrong. I am my own person. I am strong and capable and you have nothing to do with that. So thank you for leaving me.

In my most vulnerable of times, I struggled with the fact that you didn't want me. You could have watched me grow into the person that I have become, but you didn't. You had a choice to be in my life. I thought that the fact that my own father didn't want me spoke to my own worth. I was wrong. I am so worthy. I am deserving, and you have nothing to do with that. So thank you for leaving me.

You have missed so much. From my first dance to my first day of college, and you'll continue to miss everything. You won't see me graduate, you won't walk me down the aisle, and you won't get to see me follow my dreams. You'll never get that back, but I don't care anymore. What I have been through, and the struggles that I have faced have brought me to where I am today, and I can't complain. I go to a beautiful school, I have the best of friends, I have an amazing family, and that's all I really need.

Whoever you are, I hope you read this. I hope you understand that you have missed out on one of the best opportunities in your life. I could've been your daughter. I could have been your little girl. Now I am neither, nor will I ever be.

So thank you for leaving me because I am happy. I understand my self-worth, and I understand that you don't define me. You have made me stronger. You have helped make me who I am without even knowing it.

So, thank you for leaving me.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Pride? Pride.

Who are we? Why are we proud?

78
views

This past week, I was called a faggot by someone close to me and by note, of all ways. The shock rolled through my body like thunder across barren plains and I was stuck paralyzed in place, frozen, unlike the melting ice caps. My chest suddenly felt tight, my hearing became dim, and my mind went blank except for one all-encompassing and constant word. Finally, after having thawed, my rage bubbled forward like divine retribution and I stood poised and ready to curse the name of the offending person. My tongue lashed the air into a frenzy, and I was angry until I let myself break and weep twice. Later, I began to question not sexualities or words used to express (or disparage) them, but my own embodiment of them.

For members of the queer community, there are several unspoken and vital rules that come into play in many situations, mainly for you to not be assaulted or worse (and it's all too often worse). Make sure your movements are measured and fit within the realm of possible heterosexuality. Keep your music low and let no one hear who you listen to. Avoid every shred of anything stereotypically gay or feminine like the plague. Tell the truth without details when you can and tell half-truths with real details if you must. And above all, learn how to clear your search history. At twenty, I remember my days of teaching my puberty-stricken body the lessons I thought no one else was learning. Over time I learned the more subtle and more important lessons of what exactly gay culture is. Now a man with a head and social media accounts full of gay indicators, I find myself wondering both what it all means and more importantly, does it even matter?

To the question of whether it matters, the answer is naturally yes and no (and no, that's not my answer because I'm a Gemini). The month of June has the pleasure of being the time of year when the LGBT+ community embraces the hateful rhetoric and indulges in one of the deadly sins. Pride. Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, the figures at the head of the gay liberation movement, fought for something larger than themselves and as with the rest of the LGBT+ community, Pride is more than a parade of muscular white men dancing in their underwear. It's a time of reflection, of mourning, of celebration, of course, and most importantly, of hope. Pride is a time to look back at how far we've come and realize that there is still a far way to go.

This year marks fifty years since the Stonewall Riots and the gay liberation movement launched onto the world stage, thus making the learning and embracing of gay culture that much more important. The waves of queer people that come after the AIDS crisis has been given the task of rebuilding and redefining. The AIDS crisis was more than just that. It was Death itself stalking through the community with the help of Regan doing nothing. It was going out with friends and your circle shrinking faster than you can try or even care to replenish. Where do you go after the apocalypse? The LGBT+ community was a world shut off from access by a touch of death and now on the other side, we must weave in as much life as we can.

But we can't freeze and dwell of this forever. It matters because that's where we came from, but it doesn't matter because that's not where we are anymore. We're in a time of rebirth and spring. The LGBT+ community can forge a new identity where the AIDS crisis is not the defining feature, rather a defining feature to be immortalized, mourned, and moved on from.

And to the question of what does it all mean? Well, it means that I'm gay and that I've learned the central lesson that all queer people should learn in middle school. It's called Pride for a reason. We have to shoulder the weight of it all and still hold our head high and we should. Pride is the LGBT+ community turning lemons into lemon squares and limoncello. The lemon squares are funeral cakes meant to mourn and be a familiar reminder of what passed, but the limoncello is the extravagant and intoxicating celebration of what is to come. This year I choose to combine the two and get drunk off funeral cakes. Something tells me that those who came before would've wanted me to celebrate.

Related Content

Facebook Comments