The Science Behind July 27th's Blood Moon

The Science Behind July 27th's Blood Moon

Everything you need to know to understand why the moon turned red for one night.

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People all over the world stepped outside for a few moments on the night of July 27th hoping to catch a glimpse of the "Blood Moon," the longest lunar eclipse that will occur in this century. Although it was only visible for 1 hour and 43 minutes, the moon spent a total of 3 hours and 54 minutes in Earth's shadow, giving it a red hue as it moved across the sky.

Similar to its appearance, the cause of this change in color is quite elegant. "It's called a blood moon because the light from the sun goes through the earth's atmosphere on its way to the moon, and the earth's atmosphere turns it red in the same way that when the sun goes down it goes red," says Andrew Fabian, an astronomy professor at the University of Cambridge.

In fact, when the sun's light passes through Earth's atmosphere, every color is emitted from our planet. The sun's projection of white light (light containing fragments of every visible color) is dissipated by Earth on its way to the moon and sent back out into space. However, the long wavelengths of the red light cause it to be "bent" and ultimately directed straight back towards the moon. This is also why the moon may have appeared to have an orange or yellow tint to some, as these colors are close to red on the spectrum.

Although there will be about 230 lunar eclipses (the passing of the moon behind the Earth) throughout the twenty-first century, the one that occurred on July 27th, 2018 will be the longest and most visible. This is because due to the moon's tilted orbit, it will spend the most time in the Umbra (Earth's shadow) on this night.

Even the chemists at NASA can jump for joy when the blood moon comes out of hiding, as the lack of sunlight directed at the moon causes the rocks on the surface to freeze and crack, ultimately releasing gas and providing scientists with new data for further research. As hotspots for modern cosmic exploration, blood moons continue to provide us with new information to help us better understand celestial phenomena.

Despite the fact that we will not get to experience the full blood moon again until the year 2132, the awe-inspiring photos and sense of unity from the night of July 27th are truly a gift.

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5 Ways Impulsively Getting A Dog Saved My Mental Health

Those four paws are good for a lot more than just face kisses.

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Shortly before my husband and I officially moved out onto our own, he surprised me with a puppy in hand on the morning of our anniversary. Moving out, tackling college, and everything in between, I thought another huge responsibility was the last thing I needed. However, in reality, Oakley, the lab/Australian shepard/collie mix, was exactly what I needed to get back to "me."


He provides emotional support

One of the most obvious reasons is how much emotional support dogs, (and other respective animals) can provide. His paws have been accidentally stepped on, and he certainly isn't a fan of the forced flea/tick medication doses, but less than 30 seconds later, he is without fail immediately by my side again, tail wagging and ready for more kisses. Although he is not trained or certified as an ESA, it's without a doubt he has effectively (and unconsciously) combated random anxiety attacks or feelings of being alone.

He requires being cared for

You'll heavily judge every crazy fur mama, as did, I until you become one. Getting Oakley immediately got me consistently back on my feet and forced me to ask myself, "What does he need today?"Even simple, easy tasks like taking him out to run/go to the bathroom had me excited and forced me to find a motive in the day to day activities. I loved no longer having even the mere choice to be unproductive. Don't want to start your day? Well, Oakley needs his day started, so let's get moving.

He serves as protection

It's no surprise how far a dog's loyalty will go to protect their owner. For decades, specially trained dogs have had life-saving responsibilities assigned to them. Even being married, my husband and I's schedules vary significantly to where it is not uncommon for me to be alone. The slightest sound or shadow from outside our door immediately initiates barking. In the bathroom taking a shower? He's there. Knowing that Oakley is looking out, even when I get carried away with tasks like cooking dinner, always calms my nerves.

He's become something to look forward to

The nice thing about having Oakley is regardless of how my day goes, I know exactly how it is going to end. Whether I passed an exam with flying colors or got the lowest grade in the class, I know what waits for me when I open the door at home. After a long day, nothing resets my mood like walking into a face that is just as happy and excited to see me!

He encourages bonds with others

If you want your social interaction to sky rocket: get a puppy. No, I'm serious. You'll have people wanting to come over and visit "you" (let's be real… your puppy), like it's your last day on Earth. For me, this was exactly what I needed. Getting Oakley had family members constantly checking in to see how he was growing, learning, etc. Not only did this encourage more interactions with family and friends, but it also "livened" my husband and I's home life. Instead of the "normal" weekend nights consisting of Netflix and MarioKart, (which are enjoyable in their own respective ways), spending our nights playing Monkey in the Middle with our new four-legged friend has proven much more entertaining.

So ideally was it the right time to get a dog? Probably not. However, adding Oakley to my small little family combated anxiety and depression in ways I wouldn't have ever thought possible.

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Florida Native's First Snow Is A Doozy

Seattle's most snow in February since 1923 hits hard

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For all of us Washingtonians, the recent snow storm is something we were unprepared for. Seattle broke the record for the most snow in February since 1923. But for a Floridian who has never seen the snow, this week has been an adventure right out of a Christmas movie.


Snow in Tacoma, WashingtonMaddy McKeever


My friend and I reside under an hour drive away from Seattle in the city of Tacoma, Washington, and despite not being in the record-breaking city, we still had at least 7 inches of snow. The result? More than 40 people calling out of our store because of unsafe driving conditions (including myself), massive food and de-icer shortages, and a revitalization of the old Seattle driver stereotype.

Presented with a once in a lifetime opportunity, I decided to take my Florida friend on a snow day through the winter wonderland that was Wapato Park. He adored it.

My dog, Hyperion, in the snowMaddy McKeever

Despite having to carry my small dog a lot because of the depth of the snow, the trip went wonderfully. We all three bundled up immensely, none of us use to being out when it was 19 degrees Fahrenheit, even the dog.

The trip began with a stereotypical snowball fight, but quickly turned into a dazzling photo shoot. The landscape was like that of a painting: tall fir trees dusted in fresh snow, paths carved out by countless frozen footsteps, and friends slipping and sliding across bridges covered in blankets of white. It was truly a sight to see.

Wapato Park bridgeMaddy McKeever

I have still yet to experience the heat of a Florida summer, but my friend has now lived through a cold west coast winter. If he can make it through a park with dogs running all around and not fall face-first into the ice, all us Washingtonians can too.

We've all heard of Christmas in July, but it's Christmas in February this year. Anyone know of a good Valentine's Day movie set in the snow?


Wapato Park's frozen lakeMaddy McKeever

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