6 Of The Best Youtubers To Watch When You're Bored

6 Of The Best Youtubers To Watch When You're Bored

Whenever I'm bored I can count on these six channels to pass the time and entertain me!

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Over the summer I found myself with a lot of free time on my hands. To pass the time I watched a lot of YouTube videos and found a ton of amazing creators that appealed to a bunch of my interests. So if you ever find some free time on your hands, here are the best YouTubers to check out! Whenever I'm bored I can count on these six channels to pass the time and entertain me!

1. Casey Holmes: Makeup 

This is my favorite video from Casey! She has easy to follow tutorials, product reviews, get ready with me videos, and fun tag videos. She is by far one of my favorites to watch and I love her vlog channel as well!

2. James Charles: Makeup

I know some people really don't like James Charles, but I find him so funny and over the top. Like who else would have zoo animals pick out their makeup?

3. Jessica Braun: Makeup

If you love beauty, but tend to use drugstore products this is the channel for you! My best friend introduced me to this channel and honestly I can't get enough.

4. Tyler Braun: Travel

Tyler is Jessica's husband and they make the cutest couple! They go to Disney all the time and have so many videos from Disney parks, which is my favorite thing about this channel.

5. Shane Dawson: King of Youtube

I live for conspiracy theories and the way Shane films/explains them is amazing. If conspiracies aren't your thing, he has also started making documentaries about other YouTubers like TanaCon and Jeffery Starr.

6. Savannah Brymer: Murder Cases, Disappearances, Beauty, and Fun 

This channel has something for everyone. I started watching Savannah for her videos about murder cases, but found that her vlogs, makeup tutorials, and storytimes are just as entertaining.

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Most Popular Beauty Gurus On YouTube That Will Inspire You

"May your day be as flawless as your makeup."
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On YouTube, there are so many different channels, but favorite are the beauty ones. Here's a list of the 20 most popular beauty gurus on YouTube that will inspire you:

1. Jaclyn Hill

Jaclyn Hill, 26 years old, is a professional makeup artist, beauty and fashion blogger, and YouTube phenomenon who publishes videos to her channel Jaclyn Hill.

2. Nikki Tutorials

Nikki De Jager, 22 years old, is a professional hair and makeup artist whose publishes her videos NikkieTutorials YouTube channel.

3. Nicole Guerriero

Nicole Guerriero, 30 years old, is a makeup and beauty guru with an enormous social media presence. She runs a blog called Naturally Nicole where she posts tutorials, DIYs, reviews, and fashion blogs and beauty videos on her Youtube channel.

4. Carli Bybel

Carli Bybel, 26 years old,YouTube superstar and makeup, beauty, fashion and fitness guru who publishes videos to her channel. In addition, she also runs a highly successful blog called The Fashion Bybel.

5. Bethany Mota

Bethany Mota, 21 years old, YouTube star known for giving beauty tips to youngsters on the web. Her channel has earned over 10 million subscribers. She became the first YouTuber to ever be a cast member on Dancing With The Stars in 2014, and that same year she also won a Teen Choice Award for Most Popular Female Web Star as well as a Streamy Award for Best Fashion Show. In addition, she also collaborated with Aeropostale clothing line.

6. Lauren Curtis

Lauren Curtis, 24 years old, top Australian YouTube fashion and beauty guru known for her channel, where she posts makeup and hair tutorials, product reviews and all things beauty-related.

7. Laura Lee

Laura Lee, 28 years old, YouTube beauty vlogger who posts hauls, makeup tutorials and look-books to her channel.

8. Casey Holmes

Casey Holmes, 25 years old, hair and makeup obsessed YouTuber who publishes videos on her channel.

9. Teni Panosian

Teni Panosian, 32 years old, beauty, makeup, skincare, hair and style video blogger and vlogger also known as Miss Maven.

10. Tess Christine

Tess Christine, 25 years old, beauty and fashion guru who started her YouTube channel in April of 2011.

11. Lauren Elizabeth

Lauren Elizabeth, 22 years old, actress, fashion and beauty YouTube personally known for her channel who also opens up to her subscribers about serious issues in her life in hopes of inspiring girls everywhere.

12. Manny Mua

Manny Mua, 25 years old, popular YouTube personality who runs a beauty and makeup channel where he posts reviews, tutorials and more to his channel Manny Mua.

13. Jeffree Star

Jeffree Star, 31 years old, is gender-bending singer, fashion designer, DJ, performer, makeup artist and fashion and beauty blogger who publishes videos to Youtube.

14. Kathleen Lights

Kathleen Fuentes, 25 years old, Style Haul partner and beauty guru known for her YouTube channel as KathleenLights.

15. Aspyn Ovard

Aspyn Ovard, 20 years old, video content creator who is a beauty and fashion guru known for her self-titled YouTube channel. She also runs a secondary channel called Aspyn + Parker with her husband Parker Ferris. In addition, Aspyn and Parker own an clothing store online called Luca + Grae.

16. Desi Perkins

Desi Perkins, 29 years old, lifestyle and beauty vlogging sensation on YouTube who is also incredibly popular on Instagram.

17. Caitlin Bea

Caitlin Bea, 23 years old, YouTuber who is a beauty, fashion, and lifestyle guru. She became a partner with StyleHaul and Maybelline New York.

18. Patrick Starr

Patrick Starr, 27 years old, Filipino-American YouTube beauty expert, better known online as Patrick Starrr, who works as a professional freelance makeup artist.

19. Huda Kattan

Huda Kattan, 33 years old, social media phenomenon who created the blog Huda Beauty which became the #1 blog in the Middle East and a top 20 beauty blog worldwide. She posts her video content to her self-titled YouTube channel as Huda Beauty. She is a Hollywood trained makeup artist and beauty consultant who started her own makeup cosmetic line.

20. Tati Westbrook

Tati Westbrook, 35 years old, best known on YouTube by her channel name GlamLifeGuru, she is a Hollywood makeup artist and stylist who posts beauty hauls, tips, tutorials and reviews to her channel.

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It’s Time To Stop Letting Victoria’s Secret Define What Is Beautiful

Glorifying and commodifying a specific type of body on a large-scale is damaging to women everywhere.

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Victoria's Secret is a retailer that thrives off of exclusion and maintains notions of beauty and attractiveness that are no longer as welcomed in the 21st century.

Frankly, capitalism will likely wipe out the brand when people stop buying their lingerie due to lack of support for the company.

That's the beauty of capitalism.

In fact, VS stock, which is now down 40% indicates that this type of change is coming to the lingerie marketplace, where women now value companies that promote bodily diversity and don't shame certain kinds of bodies for not adhering to the beauty standard set by Victoria's Secret.

While Victoria's Secret has increased its diversity throughout the years regarding ethnic backgrounds, the body type represented in the brand is incredibly homogenous.

The models in the show are all runway models outside of the Victoria's Secret show, meaning that they adhere to standard agency requirements. These requirements dictate a female model be at least 5'8 in height, and while weight is not often specified, models are usually between 105-120 pounds.

Any brief exploration into the models on the site will show that their measurements are around 31-34 inches in the bust, with a 22-26 inch waist and 34-36 inch hips. These measurements correspond to sizes 0-2, which are often used as sample sizes for the runway.

This article is not meant to attack their signature model, "Angels." They are beautiful women who fit the needs of the fashion industry they earn a living in. However, they are not the ONLY type of beautiful women to exist.

Further, this article is not meant to denigrate naturally thin individuals. I am a size 0 myself, so many people consider me a "thin" individual.

People might fail to understand why I disapprove of Victoria's Secret as a brand. After all, they cater to individuals with my body type, so what is there for me to complain about?

I don't fit their height requirement, meaning that I could never be one of their esteemed Angels. And you could ask yourself, "so why does that matter?"

The vast majority of women in the United States could never come close to achieving the bodily standards observed in Victoria's Angels that the brand emphasizes.

And which it's important for companies to cater to individual markets to ensure corporate diversity, Victoria's Secret remains a lingerie giant and has a massive ability in dictating national standards of beauty.

They also sell sizes beyond the XS or S displayed in the fashion show, yet fail to include bodies in the show that would fit their M, L, or XL sizes they sell in stores.

The problem with influence and lack representation coupled with their marketing strategy dictates to women that the Angel is the pinnacle of beauty. Therefore by wearing their lingerie, you get to supposedly feel like an Angel in the Victoria's Secret fantasy.

And yet, you don't.

Why?

Because even if you get sucked into their marketing scheme and buy their bras and underwear expecting to feel better about yourself, if you're not absolutely secure and completely love with your body already, you'll just recognize that you will never fit the Angel standard that you feel is expected of you to be considered beautiful.

And that when you look in the mirror, you not looking like an Angel makes you feel like a fraud.

Victoria's Secret further utilizes the term "sexy" often, meaning that wearing their lingerie is supposed to make you attractive and appealing to the opposite sex.

So not only is their brand about idealizing specific types of bodies but commodifying these particular bodies as objects of prime attractiveness to the opposite sex.

There is a consequence of presenting one body type as the most beautiful and categorizing it as incredibly sexy. For women, they risk feeling that a guy seeing them in lingerie will think of them as unattractive since they don't adhere to the epitomized beauty standard so endlessly praised in the media.

Victoria's Secret emphasizes that their show is a "fantasy." This notion of a fantasy can imply that it's not real. However, we as consumers know those models are still real people. And even if they're bronzed, made-up and thrust out onto the runway in perfect lighting, the bodies walking that runway wouldn't be there if Victoria's Secret didn't already consider them perfect before the show.

Further, Ed Razek, the Chief Marketing Officer of Creative Services of L Brands (the company that owns Victoria's Secret) responded to a question concerning bodily diversity in this manner:

"We attempted to do a television special for plus sizes (in 2000). No one had any interest in it, still don't,"

His quote is prime evidence that the minds behind Victoria's Secret do not consider bodies outside their norms interesting, nor beautiful enough to be in the spotlight.

In the eyes of Victoria's Secret, we women who don't fit the Angel model are not valued. We are not, and never will be, as attractive or as sexy since we are not, and cannot become, Angels.


To them, we are just women who chase their notions of beauty and sexiness to try and fulfill our desires to feel that way about ourselves. We remain consumers thinking that someday, maybe we will get close to or achieve that ideal and that wearing their lingerie is somehow a way to get there.

And since the vast majority of women in the United States feel insecure about their bodies, Victoria's Secret capitalizes on women's insecurities.

Brands such as ThirdLove and Savage X Fenty have made efforts to turn lingerie from devices of body standards and external validation to objects worn by women of all backgrounds for support, self-confidence, and comfortability. They've also worked to move the notion of sexiness away from something determined by the opposite sex to instead a feeling one experiences from empowering their own female sexuality.

All in all, you get to decide what companies you support, where to put your money and who you think makes the nicest lingerie.

I, along with many other women, have decided I don't want to spend my money at Victoria's Secret anymore. I've been on too long of a journey of bodily hate and self-destruction, and I feel that it is time for me to move on and surround myself in a social movement that doesn't make me feel less of a woman.

Maybe one day, Victoria's Secret will do someone to cater to the millions of women upturning their noses at their company. And if not, they may have to settle as a smaller, specialty retailer that emphasizes clothing for smaller women.

Regardless, a change in marketing could benefit their sales and stock.

Otherwise, a lot of us women are going to go elsewhere and work to redefine what it means to be beautiful.

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