I Experience Ageism In The Working World Everyday

I Experience Ageism In The Working World Everyday

Adults tend to treat you differently the younger you are.
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Right now, you are at what is considered a tender age.

You are probably in college, probably have a job and a boatload of responsibility. However, despite being in your late teens-early twenties, most of the adult world still considers you a kid and treats you as such.

This is prevalent in the work field. Older co-workers tend to scrutinize you more or underestimate you because of your age rather than your work ethic.

I speak from experience. I am 19, two months shy of 20, and I work at 7-Eleven. Not the best job in the world, I’ll admit, but it works with my school schedule so I can’t complain.

When I started, I loved my job. It was easy and I was good at it and at the time everyone seemed so nice. Once I got further along in my employment, that all changed.

Being the youngest that works there, I was coined as the “baby” of the place. It has come to a point that instead of my coworkers treating me as their equal, like we are, they try and parent me at work.

This bothers me because one, I have parents already and two, I’m there to do a job, which I do, better than most in fact.

This experience has shown me that the younger generation isn’t treated as fairly as they should be in the workplace. Many older adults tend to question the maturity and intelligence of the “kids” they work with.

It’s almost like they expect us to be immature and fail so they can scrutinize us.

They judge us based on our age before they have even seen our work ethic.

Now, this is not me saying that all adults do this, it happens everywhere, I’m just pointing out things I have noticed at my job as well as a few others.

I know not everyone does this, in fact, my best friend at work is a 47-year-old. He is old enough to be my father, yet he admires my work ethic and gave me a chance despite my age. He has even said that I have better work ethic than half the adults I work with. So, there are definitely good people out there that give you a fair chance.

However, despite having him as a wonderful coworker and friend, there is always one person you will find that will get under your skin.

Unfortunately, I have found that person and she is what sparked this article after a particularly bad night at work. She is constantly ordering me around like she is the boss, which she isn’t and constantly criticizes me to the point that it can be considered an insult.

I get she has kids my age and even older than I, but that doesn’t make her my mother or give her the right to say what she says. I noticed that I am the only one that she is like that with and I highly believe that it has to do with my age.

Another thing that really grinds my gears is that because we are young we are not allowed to hurt or be tired.

Adults always say, ‘You’re too young to be tired’ or ‘You're too young to be complaining of aches and pains.’ I have a couple co-workers who always do this. I get that the younger you are the easier things are, but that doesn’t mean we don’t get tired.

I go to school full-time and work almost full time as well. I don’t go out and party like other college kids and I don’t stay out all hours of the night. I barely have a social life because between work and school and homework there isn’t time for anything else.

My schedule any given day is very busy, so given that, I think I deserve the right to say I’m tired, especially when I have a day where I’m at school from 9:30 to 4 and then work from 5 to 11.

Yes, I’m young, but spending all day on my feet still, makes them hurt. Despite being tired and sore I still show up to work every day and do my best.

This generation has been painted as the “lazy” generation; the generation that takes the easy way out. The generation that does as little work as possible and possibly the most disrespectful generation.

While this may be true for some, it is not true for all. I know many “kids” that have terrific work ethics, that strive to be the best, and take anyway but the easy way out. Just because we are young does not mean we cannot work as well or even better than some of the old timers out there.

And now I’ll leave you with a quote with an unknown source: “Those who criticize our generation forget who raised it.”

Cover Image Credit: pexels.com

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

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The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

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The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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The Danger Of Future Tripping

Making small goals can help you achieve a better tomorrow.

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The future is mysterious. Because of this elusive, unknown timeline we all face, why shouldn't we spend our time daydreaming of our distant goals and desires? These dreams have a tendency to taunt us in our seemingly boring present life. But it feels so wonderful to visualize ourselves in a better, distant state of absolute satisfaction and fulfillment in all aspects of our future. This visual that we create of a happier, healthier, and stronger self, is what we consider to be our ending goal; our definition of success.

So what is future tripping, and why is it detrimental to our future success and present satisfaction with our lives? According to Healthyplace.com future tripping is a "human condition of peering into the imagined future and anticipating the outcome," but what's wrong with visualizing our "perfect" future career, future lifestyle, and future home, with a wood burning stove and all? Well, before I completely bash visualizing a "better" you, I have to give it credit because it gives you a motivator. The issue is that people, including myself, get so caught up in what we want rather than what we need to do to achieve this version of ourselves and our life.

If we were to only focus on our ending goal, we are creating an existence of madness, and impatience. We need to begin making smaller goals and smaller effort in an effort to become better. A peer of mine said something the other day that struck home. In my own words, he said, "You can only be better than the person you were yesterday." What a simple, achievable goal to work on daily. It sets the bar low, making it easier to feel satisfied as you lie in bed at night and think, "What did I do today that made me a better me than yesterday?" In making these small, easily achievable goals daily, you are working towards this future "self" you wish to become. In other words, you must walk before you can run.

The sooner we begin rewiring our consciousness to confront our current life, self, and mini goals, the more attainable and realistic our far-off goals will become. Each day must be lived, that is a fact. If we are always thinking about tomorrow, or a year from now, or decades from now, we are wasting the precious opportunities of living, exploring, and growing that today offers. If we continue to romanticize and future trip, our levels of current satisfaction will begin to plateau.

I'd like to add and reiterate, that it is good to plan, and that it is good to have an overarching goal to work towards. College presents a perfect environment for structuring your goals (career/life path), and giving you daily errands (homework) that slowly, but surely, take you closer to your desired outcome.

So I hope that in reading this, you will start to catch yourself from future tripping in those moments of current disappointment and make a goal to make tomorrow better.

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