The Difference Between A High School and College Athlete

The Difference Between A High School and College Athlete

Nothing comes easy.

High school sports are some of the greatest times in a young athlete’s life. You begin to play with a group of people that you will surround yourself with for your high school career, if you play all four years.

This is a great experience for anyone in any sport, but it has no comparison to being a student athlete for your college. When you get to college everything you thought you knew about your sport changes and you have to start over.

Participating in a college sport is a very humbling experience for a student athlete, you have to adjust to a college schedule and manage all your classes, along with your sport. This is an experience that changes who you are as a person.

High school sports teams are filled with many different types of players. For example there is the kid that doesn’t enjoy playing the sport, but they love the game so they play in high school to keep it in their life.

Then you have the kids who aren’t actually fans of the sport, but they were put into it at a young age and it’s the only thing they have ever known, so they continue to play to feel comfortable. Then there are the kids who do not care about winning or losing, they are just happy to be there and they have fun playing regardless of the outcome.

As far as talent goes, whichever category you fall into does not dictate the talent you possess, these categories are mainly about mindset. Whether you are the best or the worst on your high school team you are still a part of a team and you work together with your team to reach your goal.

Now regarding the members of the team, some are better than others and then there are some who go on to continue their athletic career in college. These are the dedicated athletes; the ones who eat, breathe, and sleep their sport. Everything they do revolves around making themselves better in their sport.

When you have one of these kids on your team everyone knows who they are. When visiting teams come to your school to play your team the visiting team fears this player. Rumors begin to spread that this player has committed to play at a big time division one school in college and everyone wants to watch them perform.

Whether it’s on your team or another when that person steps into the spotlight everyone stops to watch, because they know something special is happening. Once their senior season comes to an end, they go down as one of the best to ever play it at their school.

Even years after they are done, this player is still talked about because of their high school accomplishment,; but after high school everyone stops following this player to focus on the next potential big shot that rolls through and that players college career may go unnoticed.

Once you get to college, you face new challenges every day and the simple adjustment of becoming a college student is not an easy one. You begin to live on your own away from home and you are becoming an adult with your own responsibilities.

You set your own priorities and have the freedom to do what you want. That’s as a regular college student, but not for the student athlete. As a student athlete, you have two main priorities, class and sports.

When you get to college as a student athlete you begin to realize how “next-level” college sports really is. The two hour practices after school don’t exist anymore, your life revolves around your sport and you spend all of your time either in class or with your team.

It becomes clear very quickly that the only focus you should have is school and sports, and if you feel you need more time to hang out with your friends and sports are consuming your time, then college sports isn’t for you.

Once you finally meet your team, you begin to realize the difference between college and high school. All those kids that don’t enjoy playing the sport, or the ones that don’t care about winning and losing all disappear, they simply don’t exist.

Everyone is there for the same reason as you and the sooner you realize that the better off you will be. There are no slackers and lollygaggers, and everyone is a hard worker. These are some things you realize before you even begin to compete with them, once you get ready for your first practice your eyes will truly be opened.

Your first college practice puts a lot of pressure on you as a college freshman. You want to make a good impression on the players and the coaches and all the returning players are personally evaluating you as well to see how you stack up against college level athletes.

When you begin, you realize all the automatic success you saw in high school isn’t so automatic anymore. Every player was the superstar at their high school and you immediately feel out of place. You have always been a top tier player, one of the best and now you feel as if you are just in the middle of the pack. It isn’t something you are very used to and it takes some adjustment.

This is why I previously mentioned college sports are a humbling experience; because no matter how good you think you are your college team is filled with players just as good or better than you are. Nobody on your college team is a bad player, they have all put in the time and effort to get to the college level and now you have to compete for a spot and it’s a battle.

The early stages are a tough time for a newcomer like yourself and in some cases struggling players begin to question themselves; they begin to wonder if they are good enough to play at this level. In some cases fear settles in and you even question your abilities.

This is when the time comes that you need to work harder than ever to prove to not only yourself but your team that you belong there.

Getting to this stage wasn’t easy, it was a grind, but a rewarding one. Once you gain this confidnece, it will be easier than ever to perform at your highest level. Once you prove to yourself that you are where you should be, the rest will take care of itself and things become easier than ever.

Achieve this confidence in yourself, work hard, and you will be able to reach your full potential and become the complete college athlete you know you can be.

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Who Will Fill the Shoes Of USC's Most Productive Offensive Players From Last Season?

An inside look into who will step up and produce for the Trojans in 2018.

As spring football gets underway, the Trojans will look to replace their 3 most important players on their offense from last season.

The first is Sam Darnold, a projected top pick in this year’s NFL draft and the quarterback who helped usher USC back into prominence by delivering a Rose Bowl victory as well as a Cotton Bowl Berth. The next is Ronald Jones II, the workhorse running back for the Trojans who rushed for 1500 yards and 19 touchdowns this year and finished 4th on the all-time USC rushing list.

The third main piece of the Trojans’ offense that USC will have to replace is Deontay Burnett, who before the emergence of Tyler Vaughns and Michael Pittman, served as Darnold’s most reliable target and finished with over 1000 yards receiving and 9 touchdowns.


Whoever has to fill in Sam Darnold’s enormous shoes will have their work cut out for them next season. Currently, the two most likely players to replace the former heisman candidate are Matt Fink and Jack Sears. Fink, the more experienced of the two, served as the primary backup last season while Sears elected to take a redshirt year.

USC will also welcome in quarterback J.T. Daniels, the former Mater-Dei quarterback who led the Monarchs to an undefeated season and was regarded as the best quarterback in the 2019 class before reclassifying into the 2018 class. In his final season at Mater Dei, Daniels put up video-game like numbers.

According to 24/7 sports, he scored 62 total touchdowns while only throwing 4 interceptions. While Fink and Sears both will have the upper-hand on Daniels come the fall, it's difficult to imagine that they have anywhere near the ceiling that Daniels has. I expect Daniels to come in and win the job, ushering USC into a new era post-Darnold.

Prediction: J.T. Daniels

Running Back

While finding a replacement for Darnold should be the biggest priority for USC, running back will be a close second. During his three year tenure with the team, Ronald Jones, affectionately called RoJo by many Trojan fans, cemented himself as one of the USC greats, finishing 4th on the all-time USC rushing list. Thankfully for the Trojans, there looks to be a solid replacement in place.

Former five-star running back Stephen Carr came on strong during his freshman campaign and while he only had 363 total yards and 3 touchdowns, his performances in the season opener vs. Western Michigan and Stanford in September should solidify his role as a workhorse for the Trojans in 2017-2018.

If Carr can’t stay healthy, USC still has a plethora of options with veteran Aca’Cedric Ware and Vavae Malepeai who both played well in stretches last season.

Prediction: Stephen Carr

Wide Receiver

On the outside, Tyler Vaughns and Michael Pittman both look like the future for the Trojans. Described by many as “big men with little men skills”, they should be huge contributors for USC next season regardless of who is throwing to them. However, USC still has to replace Deontay Burnett, who despite his lack of size, had over 1000 yards receiving and 9 touchdowns last year.

While Trevon Sidney, Velus Jones Jr., and Josh Imatorbhebhe are all viable candidates to fill in for Burnett, none have the ceiling of Amon-Ra St. Brown, an incoming freshman and arguably the best receiver in the 2018 class. His combination of route-running and playmaking should impress coaches and will be a perfect complement to the skills of Vaughns and Pittman.

Prediction: Amon-Ra St.Brown

Cover Image Credit: Wikipedia Commons

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6 Ways To Craft The "Perfect" March Madness Bracket

It's that time of year again

My family could be described as rather competitive… to put it nicely. Everything can be made a competition between us from who has the most hockey state championships, to playing board games, to who gets shotgun, and even to who mom’s favorite is (a dispute she refuses to settle). Competitiveness just comes with being a Purcell, but some things bring it out of us more than others. March Madness being one of them.

Everyone is always trying to be the one who has the perfect bracket… or in our case, it’s more often the least flawed bracket. Either way, as the years have gone through, I have used multiple strategies in an attempt to construct the winning bracket. I have yet to win, so I don’t know if I’d take my advice, but if you get stuck here are some ideas you can try.

1. Mascots

Some schools just have that one mascot that makes you stop and think, “Wow that is so cool” or “Aw that’s kind of cute” and you might as well give the creative mascot the benefit of the doubt.

2. Location

One year I picked the warmer climate, but I guess you could go for the colder climate if you really wanted to.

3. Where Your Friends Go

As a freshman in college, this was my go-to strategy this year and I have a good feeling about it. Just had to make sure the high school friends know I still support them.

4. School Colors

Look good, feel good, right? So, the best colors

have a high chance of producing positive results.

5. Higher Seed

As someone who is really not a numbers person, it pains me to admit that sometimes you just have to go with the number.

6. V-for Villanova, V-for Victory

I swear I’m not biased, but it just always makes sense to have Villanova winning the whole thing.

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