Basia Najarro Skudrzyk, International Business Professional Shares How to Increase Motivation

Basia Najarro Skudrzyk, International Business Professional Shares How to Increase Motivation

Your desire to get what you want isn't as powerful as the compulsion to linger in your comfort zone. If the description fits, you need more motivation.

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Do you struggle to get things done? Part of you wants tasks completed, yet, another holds you back. Perhaps you have dreams, but don't reach for them. Your desire to get what you want isn't as powerful as the compulsion to linger in your comfort zone. If the description fits, you need more motivation.

Below, Basia Najarro Skudrzyk shares how to increase your motivation. Ms. Najarro Skudrzyk has distinguished herself with her listening skills and attention to client needs.

Program your mind for success

You can think of your mind as a computer since you can program thought patterns and get rid of unwanted encoding. Perhaps, when you work toward goals, your mindset holds you back. Does fear defeat you? Then again, changing may not seem worthwhile. To be successful, you must reprogram your mind to forecast victory and enjoy variation.

Rather than anticipate failure, picture yourself succeeding. Create a movie in your head. Make it clear, bright, and colorful. See steady progress to your desired outcome. If pictures of failure appear, use your imagination to make them drab and dull, and shrink them.

Program your mind to like change using affirmations as well. Regularly repeat the phrases "I am curious about the future," and "I look forward to unexpected events," to forge dominant pathways along which helpful thoughts continue to travel.

Take small steps often

"Thinking about objectives will only get you so far. To succeed, take small steps toward achievement," stated Basia Skudrzyk Najarro. Make sure you progress regularly, and your motivation will intensify. Each little triumph will propel you on to greater enterprises and help you move forward.

Chart your advancement in visual ways so you can see you're making headway. Also, discuss your successes with friends, colleagues, and your family. Be passionate and use positive language. The way you speak will shape the new thinking patterns appearing in your brain.

Stick with your supporters

Have you noticed people react in various ways when you mention your aspirations? Some support you. Others say little or discourage you. Naysayers will decrease your motivation. Your supporters, though, will provide encouragement.

Spend time with generous, positive people who want the best for you. Make them your confidants rather than unhelpful people. If your tribe is small, widen your social circle. Network and join groups with comparable goals which assist one another.

Your motivation might be small, but don't worry. It can improve. Program your mind to meet success using visualization and affirmations. Take small, regular steps too and surround yourself with allies to increase your enthusiasm.

About Basia Najarro Skudrzyk:

Basia Najarro Skudrzyk has been working as a synergy-oriented business professional for over 15 years. With experience in the education, manufacturing, healthcare, and hospitality industries, she understands how building professional networks can transform the potential of any organization. Ms. Najarro Skudrzyk also manages effective communication on a local and international level, picking and managing creative teams through expansive projects.

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Troy University Needs to Realize That There Are More Students Than Greek Life And SGA

"In unity, there is strength." - Riverdale

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At Troy University, there are three groups present on campus: those that are Greek, those that are a part of the Student Government Association, and those that are don't affiliate with either.

During my search for a college to attend, one of my stipulations was that I didn't want Greek life to be the only dominant force on campus (along with things such as cost, location, majors offered etcetera). Troy University boasts a Greek population of only 20% and this number intrigued me because, at many schools, it seems to be a higher percentage of students. However, after attending Troy University for a little over a semester now, I doubt this number because every time I turn around, another student is telling me about what sorority they are a member of, or about what fraternity they are a member of on campus.

And, admittedly, prior to the first SGA election, I was pretty clueless as to what SGA was because SGA was not a big deal at my high school. To be more truthful, I didn't understand the full extent of SGA until now while the SGA presidential race is happening.

Greek life isn't bad and those that are a part of Greek life aren't bad. The SGA isn't bad and those that are a member of the SGA aren't bad. It just feels like Greek life and SGA goes hand-in-hand for those that are independent and makes being involved on campus that much harder.

Those who ran for SGA will promote the fact they are a part of a sorority or fraternity, and thus, represent the student body; however, if only 20% of Troy's campus is Greek, how is this true? Something like this is what I mean. There's a lack of awareness that there is more to this campus than SGA and Greek life.

There just needs to be more attention brought to the lack of awareness of those who aren't Greek nor SGA.

For example, during Homecoming, independent organizations participated with the frats and sororities in events such as chalk the quad and making banners. Not one independent organization was promoted for chalk the quad, and I know, as a member of an independent organization, we had to ask to be recognized for winning a place for our banner. I am grateful that we were at least recognized but it shouldn't feel like fighting a war to be recognized alongside Greek organizations for completing the same activities.

This is an open plea to the new SGA President -- bring students together, all students because that is what will make Troy University a stronger college.

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Austin Alexander Burridge, Volunteer Advocate, Shares 3 Great Reasons to Volunteer and Help Others

Austin Alexander Burridge is an avid academic who studies Environmental Science at Winona State University and believes that work in the service of others is a key pillar to personal development.

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Sometimes it's easy for someone to adopt a "me, me, me" attitude. While focusing on oneself, a person may feel nice in the moment, but serving and helping others will bring lasting benefits. While there are many great reasons to serve and help others, there are three universal truths that resonate with volunteers around the globe.

Austin Alexander Burridge's 3 Reasons to Volunteer:

1. Accomplishment

Often, people fall into a trap of focusing on themselves when they are feeling down. Maybe someone did not get a job they wanted. Or perhaps a person gets dumped by an expected lifelong companion. Maybe someone feels they have underachieved after looking at Facebook and seeing great things a high school classmate has accomplished. When feeling down, helping others is a proven way to improve one's mood and attitude, and it can provide a sense of pride and accomplishment. The act of giving to those in need is an inherently good action and leaves people with a wonderful feeling of joy.

2. Gratitude

One can become more appreciative of life by serving others that have less. Whether volunteering at a soup kitchen, visiting the elderly at an assisted living center, or helping families after a natural disaster, service enables people to be grateful for what they have. Seeing people who have fewer advantages, especially those who are spirited and thankful for small things, allows one to realize just how fortunate he/she is in life.

3. Friendships

Volunteering is a great way to build meaningful friendships, not only with other volunteers but also with those who are served. One of the most profound and fascinating aspects of these relationships is how volunteers will learn from those served and vice versa. As these special bonds are built, they lead to impactful connections that last for years to come.

Of course, these are just a few reasons to volunteer and serve others. One can never go wrong by helping others as opposed to merely focusing on oneself. Volunteering invariably and inevitably contributes to personal growth, development, and satisfaction.

About Austin Alexander Burridge: Helping others has been of paramount importance to Austin, and as a part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA), Austin gave back to the community around him. He also has participated in annual peanut butter drives, The Minnesota Sandwich Project for the Homeless and collected canned goods for local food shelters. Additionally, Austin has a passion for the environment, which he pursued when visiting the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, and the Amazon Rain Forest while studying at the School of Environment Studies, which investigates ecological systems and their sustainability

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