The Future For Tempe Arts

The Future For Tempe Arts

The new Tempe Arts Award that is pushing for the exposure of arts and culture.

863
views

The Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards Subcommittee expressed their concern for the minimal amount of coverage on local Tempe artists. The lack of exposure not only discourages the youth from pursuing artistic careers and education, but it denies Tempe natives exposure to their surroundings.

The committee strives to be an advocate and ally of the Tempe art scene. The purpose of its forthcoming award is to celebrate the excellence of creators and organizations in the arts and culture of Tempe that have made significant contributions to the area.

The panel looked to the Viola Awards in Flagstaff for inspiration. However, the commissioner's plan to start off smaller and gradually expand the number of events for this award. The creation of these awards will bring more exposure in the media to the students and residents of Tempe.

Lauren Hernandez

Anthony Johnson, a member of the Tempe Arts Commissioner board expressed why he pursued and pushed for the Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards.

"This is your town. I like to paint walls, right? Nowhere in my community does anyone support it. My daughter shares the same interest. Let's face it, we are a generation that does not encourage arts for our children. How do our children get that interaction of painting big and large if it's frowned upon in your community?"

With the push for Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards, the committee will be honoring Tempe artists, educators, performers, art businesses, public arts, art events, and cultural arts. The public is welcome to apply for this award, but it will be given to an artist that is chosen by the commissioners.

The panel emphasized that once its Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards become an annual production, they hope to see more students engaging in the arts for fun and for a career.

Panel member Brenda Abney informed the commissioners that students, especially children, tend to do better on standardized testing and socially in their communities when they participate and learn about culture and the arts.

"By exploring arts and culture, young people open themselves up to a different world beyond academics or sports. They can put their mind to use in a different way and it can create a sense of belonging for them in a community. Art allows college students a creative outlet especially when you are putting so much time and energy in finding out where you belong in life. It's a place where you are free to be creative and relax," Abney said.

Lauren Hernandez

The commissioners emphasized their hope to bring awareness to not only the community but to the schools of Tempe. This includes Arizona State University, where there is a large student population at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

The Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts is located on the ASU Tempe campus and is home to over 4,700 students. The institute offers majors, minors, certificates, and electives in the arts including film, music, art, art museum, film, dance, and theatre, design, arts, media, and engineering.

Destiny Dicks, a junior environmental design major at the Herberger Institute, expressed her concerns about the generalization and lack of exposure of the arts at her school.

"I think this institute has a lot to offer, but only if you know where you want to go in the arts. There needs to be more specificity. The institute is very vague in certain areas, but I do think it does a very good job of covering and informing students of every ground."

Popular Right Now

I Am A Female And I Am So Over Feminists

I believe that I am a strong woman, but I also believe in a strong man.
656926
views

Beliefs are beliefs, and everyone is entitled to their opinion. I'm all about girl power, but in today's world, it's getting shoved down our throats. Relax feminists, we're OK.

My inspiration actually came from a man (God forbid, a man has ideas these days). One afternoon my boyfriend was telling me about a discussion his class had regarding female sports and how TV stations air fewer female competitions than that of males. In a room where he and his other male classmate were completely outnumbered, he didn't have much say in the discussion.

Apparently, it was getting pretty heated in the room, and the women in the class were going on and on about how society is unfair to women in this aspect and that respect for the female population is shrinking relative to the male population.

If we're being frank here, it's a load of bull.

SEE ALSO: To The Women Who Hate Feminism

First of all, this is the 21st century. Women have never been more respected. Women have more rights in the United States than ever before. As far as sports go, TV stations are going to air the sports that get the most ratings. On a realistic level, how many women are turning on Sports Center in the middle of the day? Not enough for TV stations to make money. It's a business, not a boycott against female athletics.

Whatever happened to chivalry? Why is it so “old fashioned" to allow a man to do the dirty work or pay for meals? Feminists claim that this is a sign of disrespect, yet when a man offers to pick up the check or help fix a flat tire (aka being a gentleman), they become offended. It seems like a bit of a double standard to me. There is a distinct divide between both the mental and physical makeup of a male and female body. There is a reason for this. We are not equals. The male is made of more muscle mass, and the woman has a more efficient brain (I mean, I think that's pretty freaking awesome).

The male body is meant to endure more physical while the female is more delicate. So, quite frankly, at a certain point in life, there need to be restrictions on integrating the two. For example, during that same class discussion that I mentioned before, one of the young ladies in the room complained about how the NFL doesn't have female athletes. I mean, really? Can you imagine being tackled by a 220-pound linebacker? Of course not. Our bodies are different. It's not “inequality," it's just science.

And while I can understand the concern in regard to money and women making statistically less than men do, let's consider some historical facts. If we think about it, women branching out into the workforce is still relatively new in terms of history. Up until about the '80s or so, many women didn't work as much as they do now (no disrespect to the women that did work to provide for themselves and their families — you go ladies!). We are still climbing the charts in 2016.

Though there is still considered to be a glass ceiling for the working female, it's being shattered by the perseverance and strong mentality of women everywhere. So, let's stop blaming men and society for how we continue to “struggle" and praise the female gender for working hard to make a mark in today's workforce. We're doing a kick-ass job, let's stop the complaining.

I consider myself to be a very strong and independent female. But that doesn't mean that I feel the need to put down the opposite gender for every problem I endure. Not everything is a man's fault. Let's be realistic ladies, just as much as they are boneheads from time to time, we have the tendency to be a real pain in the tush.

It's a lot of give and take. We don't have to pretend we don't need our men every once in a while. It's OK to be vulnerable. Men and women are meant to complement one another—not to be equal or to over-power. The genders are meant to balance each other out. There's nothing wrong with it.

I am all for being a proud woman and having confidence in what I say and do. I believe in myself as a powerful female and human being. However, I don't believe that being a female entitles me to put down men and claim to be the “dominant" gender. There is no “dominant" gender. There's just men and women. Women and men. We coincide with each other, that's that. Time to embrace it.

Cover Image Credit: chrisjohnbeckett / Flickr

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

23 Things That ~Barely~ Run Through A Girl's Mind During Her First Workout In, Like, Forever

Why did I do this to myself?

1667
views

It's the beginning of the semester and that means half of the students on campus have decided that we are going to go back to the gym after their workout routine fell through last semester. It's been months since we've stepped foot in the gym, but we are ready to attack it and get fit. That is until we get there and start going.

1. How did I get to the gym? Didn't I walk here? That should count as exercise

2. Why am I here?

3. Are these clothes tighter than they were last time?

4. Why is every single machine full? What am I supposed to do?

5. Is everyone looking at me?

6. I can't remember where anything is here

7. Okay, I am going to set this at the easiest level

8. Can I go home yet?

9. Is 3 minutes long enough? No, darn it.

10. How many calories have I burned? Only 10 are you kidding me!

11. Why is everyone else here going so hard? I look like a slacker

12. I am so sweaty right now

13. Maybe I should get a smoothie as a reward for working out

14. I am literally dying right now. I am about to drop dead

15. Only 5 more minutes to go. I've got this!

16. I don't got this

17. Why do people come here every day?

18. Last minute I'm going to go so hard right now

19. Just kidding that two seconds was good enough. I'm going to cool down for the last 58

20. Hallelujah, praise Jesus, I am done!

21. I am so tired

22. My body is so sore

23. I can't believe I have to walk home now. I've already done my exercising for the day

Related Content

Facebook Comments