The Future For Tempe Arts

The Future For Tempe Arts

The new Tempe Arts Award that is pushing for the exposure of arts and culture.

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The Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards Subcommittee expressed their concern for the minimal amount of coverage on local Tempe artists. The lack of exposure not only discourages the youth from pursuing artistic careers and education, but it denies Tempe natives exposure to their surroundings.

The committee strives to be an advocate and ally of the Tempe art scene. The purpose of its forthcoming award is to celebrate the excellence of creators and organizations in the arts and culture of Tempe that have made significant contributions to the area.

The panel looked to the Viola Awards in Flagstaff for inspiration. However, the commissioner's plan to start off smaller and gradually expand the number of events for this award. The creation of these awards will bring more exposure in the media to the students and residents of Tempe.

Lauren Hernandez

Anthony Johnson, a member of the Tempe Arts Commissioner board expressed why he pursued and pushed for the Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards.

"This is your town. I like to paint walls, right? Nowhere in my community does anyone support it. My daughter shares the same interest. Let's face it, we are a generation that does not encourage arts for our children. How do our children get that interaction of painting big and large if it's frowned upon in your community?"

With the push for Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards, the committee will be honoring Tempe artists, educators, performers, art businesses, public arts, art events, and cultural arts. The public is welcome to apply for this award, but it will be given to an artist that is chosen by the commissioners.

The panel emphasized that once its Tempe Arts and Culture Commission Awards become an annual production, they hope to see more students engaging in the arts for fun and for a career.

Panel member Brenda Abney informed the commissioners that students, especially children, tend to do better on standardized testing and socially in their communities when they participate and learn about culture and the arts.

"By exploring arts and culture, young people open themselves up to a different world beyond academics or sports. They can put their mind to use in a different way and it can create a sense of belonging for them in a community. Art allows college students a creative outlet especially when you are putting so much time and energy in finding out where you belong in life. It's a place where you are free to be creative and relax," Abney said.

Lauren Hernandez

The commissioners emphasized their hope to bring awareness to not only the community but to the schools of Tempe. This includes Arizona State University, where there is a large student population at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

The Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts is located on the ASU Tempe campus and is home to over 4,700 students. The institute offers majors, minors, certificates, and electives in the arts including film, music, art, art museum, film, dance, and theatre, design, arts, media, and engineering.

Destiny Dicks, a junior environmental design major at the Herberger Institute, expressed her concerns about the generalization and lack of exposure of the arts at her school.

"I think this institute has a lot to offer, but only if you know where you want to go in the arts. There needs to be more specificity. The institute is very vague in certain areas, but I do think it does a very good job of covering and informing students of every ground."

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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