Are You Prejudice?

Are You Prejudice?

As the saying goes: You cannot judge a book by its cover.
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We are all guilty of forming opinions of others before truly getting to know them. We can all be prejudiced at times. Perhaps not all of us demonstrate our beliefs through discriminatory actions, but the matter is we still have these judgmental thoughts in our minds. A psychologist from Princeton, Susan Fiske, suggests "That humans are hardwired for prejudice.” It is still being studied whether or not prejudice is learned from others around us, if it is innate (we are born with it), or even the possibility of it being some of both.

We teach children at an early age to dislike things that are different. We ask them to circle or cross out the thing that does not belong. As humans we like to create categories and label things. We have created the monster that is racism ourselves. Race is not biological; it is a social construct. The human species is the most closely related biologically. Our DNA is the most similar to one another, and yet we tell ourselves that “we” are so different from “them.”

We create stereotypes and some people continue to use them when forming opinions of someone else. People think, “Well of course this person is doing this, they are (insert race)!"

“White people cannot dance.”

“Black People eat fried chicken and watermelon.”

“Asians are bad drivers, but great at math.”

“All Muslims are terrorists."

“Girls are catty, weak, and bad at math.”

“Boys play sports, become doctors not teachers, and are dominant.”

The stereotypes we have formed are so well-known that it is scary. Not all white cops shoot black people. Not all black people are violent towards cops. The media highlights the white cop shooting the black kid and rarely shows the good things cops do for people. This is confirmation bias. A person can hold a preexisting belief that all white cops are jerks who shoot black people for unreasonable causes and then the media confirms this belief when the show incident after incident, but where is the opposing evidence? For some reason, the news and media prefer to show us bad things.

We are so quick to judge and assume that all white people do this or all black people do that…and it does not make any sense. If you truly want racism to die, you need to stop assuming these things and separating yourself from the group. Yes, black lives matter... but all lives matter. Why form a separate group?

It truly scares me that some people are so uneducated and oblivious, so what will the future of our country be?

The stereotypes and categories that we have created need to be destroyed somehow. Don’t teach the next generation to notice the differences.

Cover Image Credit: Odyssey

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8 Reasons Why My Dad Is the Most Important Man In My Life

Forever my number one guy.
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Growing up, there's been one consistent man I can always count on, my father. In any aspect of my life, my dad has always been there, showing me unconditional love and respect every day. No matter what, I know that my dad will always be the most important man in my life for many reasons.

1. He has always been there.

Literally. From the day I was born until today, I have never not been able to count on my dad to be there for me, uplift me and be the best dad he can be.

2. He learned to adapt and suffer through girly trends to make me happy.

I'm sure when my dad was younger and pictured his future, he didn't think about the Barbie pretend pageants, dressing up as a princess, perfecting my pigtails and enduring other countless girly events. My dad never turned me down when I wanted to play a game, no matter what and was always willing to help me pick out cute outfits and do my hair before preschool.

3. He sends the cutest texts.

Random text messages since I have gotten my own cell phone have always come my way from my dad. Those randoms "I love you so much" and "I am so proud of you" never fail to make me smile, and I can always count on my dad for an adorable text message when I'm feeling down.

4. He taught me how to be brave.

When I needed to learn how to swim, he threw me in the pool. When I needed to learn how to ride a bike, he went alongside me and made sure I didn't fall too badly. When I needed to learn how to drive, he was there next to me, making sure I didn't crash.

5. He encourages me to best the best I can be.

My dad sees the best in me, no matter how much I fail. He's always there to support me and turn my failures into successes. He can sit on the phone with me for hours, talking future career stuff and listening to me lay out my future plans and goals. He wants the absolute best for me, and no is never an option, he is always willing to do whatever it takes to get me where I need to be.

6. He gets sentimental way too often, but it's cute.

Whether you're sitting down at the kitchen table, reminiscing about your childhood, or that one song comes on that your dad insists you will dance to together on your wedding day, your dad's emotions often come out in the cutest possible way, forever reminding you how loved you are.


7. He supports you, emotionally and financially.

Need to vent about a guy in your life that isn't treating you well? My dad is there. Need some extra cash to help fund spring break? He's there for that, too.

8. He shows me how I should be treated.

Yes, my dad treats me like a princess, and I don't expect every guy I meet to wait on me hand and foot, but I do expect respect, and that's exactly what my dad showed I deserve. From the way he loves, admires, and respects me, he shows me that there are guys out there who will one day come along and treat me like that. My dad always advises me to not put up with less than I deserve and assures me that the right guy will come along one day.

For these reasons and more, my dad will forever be my No. 1 man. I love you!

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I Want My School To Be As Diverse As Their Advertisements Claim They Are

Several campuses pride themselves on a wide range of individuals who attend their institutions, but what is the reality versus the things we see?

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When deciding on a college I wanted to know what I was going to be getting myself into for 4 years. I watched so many videos of Boise State Universities campus to find out what I had to look forward to. I was from a smaller town in Southern California so I was very used to the amount of diversity in my school and basically whole life at that point. I am a White Mexican-American female and while growing up in my city, I was a part of the minority of white individuals. I always wanted a campus who would represent me, or I could see myself at. I looked at so many ads before I did a campus tour and looked at stacks of brochures scattered across my room with my sister. I saw people who looked like the friends I had throughout my life, my family, and most importantly myself.

I took two tours of the campus and noticed that there was a lack of the people I saw on the brochures on the actual campus and city. I walked around only really seeing individuals who were white. I drove the 14 hours back home and continued to think about how I didn't see the diversity that was advertised in everything I saw from the university. It wasn't until the big move-in day that I realized the lack of diversity I was experiencing in the staff and the individuals I shared classrooms with. When you check the university's website you can see the numbers and the lack of diversity.

  • American Indian/Alaska Native — <1% (118)
  • Asian — 2% (595)
  • Black/African American — 2% (425)
  • Hispanic/Latino — 13% (3,243)
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander — <1% (121)
  • Not Reported — 4% (914)
  • Two or More Races — 4% (1.079)
  • White — 73% (18,612)
  • Nonresident (International) — 2% (433)

The numbers I was seeing wasn't matching the things I was seeing around, and it wasn't until I conducted my own research and interviews with my peers that I noticed that I wasn't the only individual that was craving more diversity on campus. Other students wanted to more people who were like them around campus. Boise State University is not the only campus that will push diversity when its really to only meet their quota. Students who transferred from Arizona State University also mentioned to me that they face similar issues and feelings around diversity from their campus. I want to bring the topic of diversity to many of the student organizations on campus to help our voice be heard for a want for a more diverse campus.

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