Are You Prejudice?

Are You Prejudice?

As the saying goes: You cannot judge a book by its cover.
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We are all guilty of forming opinions of others before truly getting to know them. We can all be prejudiced at times. Perhaps not all of us demonstrate our beliefs through discriminatory actions, but the matter is we still have these judgmental thoughts in our minds. A psychologist from Princeton, Susan Fiske, suggests "That humans are hardwired for prejudice.” It is still being studied whether or not prejudice is learned from others around us, if it is innate (we are born with it), or even the possibility of it being some of both.

We teach children at an early age to dislike things that are different. We ask them to circle or cross out the thing that does not belong. As humans we like to create categories and label things. We have created the monster that is racism ourselves. Race is not biological; it is a social construct. The human species is the most closely related biologically. Our DNA is the most similar to one another, and yet we tell ourselves that “we” are so different from “them.”

We create stereotypes and some people continue to use them when forming opinions of someone else. People think, “Well of course this person is doing this, they are (insert race)!"

“White people cannot dance.”

“Black People eat fried chicken and watermelon.”

“Asians are bad drivers, but great at math.”

“All Muslims are terrorists."

“Girls are catty, weak, and bad at math.”

“Boys play sports, become doctors not teachers, and are dominant.”

The stereotypes we have formed are so well-known that it is scary. Not all white cops shoot black people. Not all black people are violent towards cops. The media highlights the white cop shooting the black kid and rarely shows the good things cops do for people. This is confirmation bias. A person can hold a preexisting belief that all white cops are jerks who shoot black people for unreasonable causes and then the media confirms this belief when the show incident after incident, but where is the opposing evidence? For some reason, the news and media prefer to show us bad things.

We are so quick to judge and assume that all white people do this or all black people do that…and it does not make any sense. If you truly want racism to die, you need to stop assuming these things and separating yourself from the group. Yes, black lives matter... but all lives matter. Why form a separate group?

It truly scares me that some people are so uneducated and oblivious, so what will the future of our country be?

The stereotypes and categories that we have created need to be destroyed somehow. Don’t teach the next generation to notice the differences.

Cover Image Credit: Odyssey

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If You've Ever Been Called Overly-Emotional Or Too Sensitive, This Is For You

Despite what they have told you, it's a gift.
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Emotional: a word used often nowadays to insult someone for their sensitivity towards a multitude of things.

If you cry happy tears, you're emotional. If you express (even if it's in a healthy way) that something is bothering you, you're sensitive. If your hormones are in a funk and you just happen to be sad one day, you're emotional AND sensitive.

Let me tell you something that goes against everything people have probably ever told you. Being emotional and being sensitive are very, very good things. It's a gift. Your ability to empathize, sympathize, and sensitize yourself to your own situation and to others' situations is a true gift that many people don't possess, therefore many people do not understand.

Never let someone's negativity toward this gift of yours get you down. We are all guilty of bashing something that is unfamiliar to us: something that is different. But take pride in knowing God granted this special gift to you because He believes you will use it to make a difference someday, somehow.

This gift of yours was meant to be utilized. It would not be a part of you if you were not meant to use it. Because of this gift, you will change someone's life someday. You might be the only person that takes a little extra time to listen to someone's struggle when the rest of the world turns their backs.

In a world where a six-figure income is a significant determinant in the career someone pursues, you might be one of the few who decides to donate your time for no income at all. You might be the first friend someone thinks to call when they get good news, simply because they know you will be happy for them. You might be an incredible mother who takes too much time to nurture and raise beautiful children who will one day change the world.

To feel everything with every single part of your being is a truly wonderful thing. You love harder. You smile bigger. You feel more. What a beautiful thing! Could you imagine being the opposite of these things? Insensitive and emotionless?? Both are unhealthy, both aren't nearly as satisfying, and neither will get you anywhere worth going in life.

Imagine how much richer your life is because you love other's so hard. It might mean more heartache, but the reward is always worth the risk. Imagine how much richer your life is because you are overly appreciative of the beauty a simple sunset brings. Imagine how much richer your life is because you can be moved to tears by the lessons of someone else's story.

Embrace every part of who you are and be just that 100%. There will be people who criticize you for the size of your heart. Feel sorry for them. There are people who are dishonest. There are people who are manipulative. There are people who are downright malicious. And the one thing people say to put you down is "you feel too much." Hmm...

Sounds like more of a compliment to me. Just sayin'.

Cover Image Credit: We Heart It

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Dear Beautiful Black Girl, Never Forget Your Worth

An ode to all the beautiful black girls.

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We live in a society where societal standards greatly define the way we view ourselves. Although in 2019 these standards are not clear cut, some things are not easy to change. Not to play the race card, but this is true for women of color, especially black girls.

As much as I'd like to address this to all women, I want to hit on something that I'm more familiar with: being a black girl. Black females have a whole package to deal with when it comes to beauty standards. The past suppression and oppression our ancestors went through years ago can still be felt in our views of beauty. It is rare to see young black girls be taught that their afros and nappy hair are beautiful. Instead, we are put under flat irons and dangerous chemicals that change our hair texture as soon as our hair becomes too "complicated" to deal with. The girls with darker skin are not praised, but rather lowered in comparison to their peers with fairer skin. A lot of the conditioning happens at a young age — at the age of 8, already you can feel like you're in the wrong skin.

As we grow up, there are more expectations that come here and there, a lot of very stereotypical and diminishing. "You're a black girl, you should know how to dance," "black girls don't have flat butts," "black girls know how to cook," "you must have an attitude since you're black" — I'm sure you get the idea. Let me say this: "black girls," as they all like to say, are not manufactured with presets. Stop looking for the same things in all of us. Black girls come in all sizes, shapes, colors, and talents. I understand that a lot of these come from cultural backgrounds, but you cannot bash a black girl because she does not fit the "ideal" description.

And there is more.

The guys that say, "I don't do black girls, they too ratchet/they got an attitude" — excuse me? Have you been with/spoken to all the black girls on this planet? Is this a category that you throw all ill-mouthed girls? Why such prejudice, especially coming from black men? Or they will chant that they interact with girls that are light-skinned, that is their conditioned self-speaking. The fact that these men have dark-skinned sisters and mothers and yet don't want to associate with girls that look the same confuses me. And who even asked you? There are 100 other ethnicities and races in the world, and we are the one you decide to spit on? Did we do something to you?

Black girls already have society looking at them sideways. First, for being a woman, and second, for being black, and black males add to this by rejecting and disrespecting us.

But we still we rise above it all.

Black girls of our generation are starting to realize the power that we hold, especially as we work hand in hand. Women like Oprah Winfrey, Lupita Nyong'o, Chinua Achebe, Michelle Obama — the list is too long — are changing the narrative of the "black girl" the world knows. The angry black woman has been replaced with the beautiful, educated, and successful melanin-filled woman.

Girls, embrace your hair, body, and skin tone, and don't let boys or society dictate what is acceptable or beautiful. The black girl magic is real, and it's coming at them strong.

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