Education Is A Privilege, It's About Time Americans Realize That

Education Is A Privilege, It's About Time Americans Realize That

Think about what your education is worth to you.

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Education is a privilege, though some may not view it as such. In America, for those of us who are privileged enough to attend school, we often take it for granted. Having access to knowledge, textbooks, teachers, etc. may not seem like anything extraordinary, but compared to other countries, it is a gift. Due to the fact that access to education in America is, for the most part, so unappreciated, we look at the world with an ethnocentric and privileged view, forgetting that not everyone is so fortunate.

My statistics professor recently described having access to education as a "blessing." He had begun to notice the number of students that chose to skip his class each week and told us that he did not understand why. Candidly, he explained that he is from Ghana and in his country, the resources that are available to us here, are not as easily accessible there. Education is a gift and in his experience, he said that he cannot begin to comprehend why it is so easy for some students to throw that gift away. It was a moment that was particularly eye-opening for me and many other students and was simultaneously a culture shock moment for my professor.

Interested in the education rates in Ghana, I chose to do some research in order to put my professor's words in context. What I have compiled, sheds some light on how our education compares on a global scale. According to NationMaster, in terms of the average years of schooling of adults, Ghana is ranked 76th compared to America's first place ranking. The average years of schooling in America are typically 12 years while in Ghana it is only 3.9. Additionally, the literacy rate for Ghana's total population is 74.8% compared to a 99% rate in the United States. The most unsettling fact that I came across was that, in comparison, Ghana spends 1% more on education. The United States is ranked behind Ghana in 26th place in this category. Though 28.5% of their population lives below the poverty line and the average number of years of schooling is equivalent to a student's high school career, Ghana spends more on education than America.

It appears unfair to compare the two countries, as they are vastly different but on a surface level, the drastic difference between them reveals a new way to look at education. Not only should it alert us to the fact that Ghana could use our help but also to the fact that our access to education is something that should be treasured. Admittedly, the U.S. education system is flawed and imperfect, it stands to be reformed (Textbooks essentially rewriting and whitewashing U.S. history is no secret, for example). Though it has its issues, it is still a privilege for those who can access it. Education should be something that is guaranteed to all, but until that becomes a reality, we should feel fortunate enough to afford it and access all it has to offer.

My professor was able to share his insightful perspective, having experienced education systems in both Ghana and the United States. I value my education greatly but without this candid moment, I would have continued looking at my education with tunnel vision. It is vital that we look outside of what we are familiar with in order to gain perspective on our own situations. Simply put, education is a privilege that we need to stop taking for granted; and one that we need to extend to those less fortunate than ourselves.

Here is a link to verified organizations that aid Ghana in various areas.

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17 Things Only Nursing Students Would Understand

Hoo boy.

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Nursing students everywhere have all similar struggles and can all come to an equal understanding when it comes to school. Many things come right to mind when I think of how much my life has changed since I made the decision to study nursing.

I have gave up a lot just to allow myself to go through this schooling but it was all proven to be worth it. If you are a nursing student I can almost guarantee all of these will spark an insight into what it is like.

1. Coffee is our water

It should seriously be "Nurses run on Dunkin" because the hours spent studying, waking up at the crack of dawn for clinical, the lack of sleep, the amount of school work, etc. would not at all be possible without the energy that coffee gives us.

2. Broke is an understatement

Who can work when you have probably more than one nursing exam, 2 care plans due on two different patients, clinical paperwork, ATI's, homework, etc? Squeezing in time to work is seriously a hard task and so money is often sparse and being a broke college student becomes an understatement.

3. College students go out every weekend?

Of course nursing students do get to go out from time to time, but the whole "I am a college student and go out 4 days a week" is not a thing to us. We know the struggles of having time to go out but realizing we have to do an assignment a week ahead of time because we know about how much we will be slammed with during the week. There is no such thing as free time when you are a nursing student. More like a study party. And when we do go out after a while, it is a complete and utter disaster.

4. Chose the answer that is most correct

Nursing students know the real struggle of narrowing down a test question to two answers because of all the 4 answers on a test question they are all correct; except you have to chose the answer that is MOST correct. It is not just a regular test where there is a right answer. You are ALWAYS right but it's not always the best answer.

5. Don't forget, select all that apply

This "select all that apply" is 10x worse than choosing the answer that is most correct. It doesn't matter if you have 2 of the 3 answers that are correct, you still get the entire question wrong. Not to mention, almost every single question on our licensing exam is select all that apply. If you think these are easy, you are simply not human.

6. Mental breakdowns and saying "I'm changing majors"

The daily to weekly mental breakdowns of hysterical crying and anxiety attacks because all of the things expected of us just do not seem possible. It's okay to admit that you have said several times that you wanted to change your major because of how difficult it is to keep up and pass. You manage to get through it though with hard work and dedication.

7. Saying goodbye to straight A's

Although you may have had straight A's in high school, say goodbye to that 4.0 GPA you were hoping for. You envy college students that have straight A's but you also don't realize that they also don't study nursing. We tend to be so hard on ourselves for not getting perfect grades but we truly don't get ourselves enough credit for just passing (which may I mention is about an 80 to even pass a class).

8. Dreading writing care plans (Rn Dx, Related To, As Evidenced By)

You think nursing students just go to clinical to learn how to care for patients to learn? WRONG. SO WRONG. We spend HOURS after clinical making care plans, reflections, SBAR assignments, etc. to hand in to our clinical professor on time on top of all the other class work we have to do for our other nursing classes.

9. What is sleep?


Have a test tomorrow? Who cares if you studied a week in advance, you know for sure you will be up the whole night up until the test is that morning. Have homework due in class? You know you will be up well past 3 in the morning finishing it.

10. Not yet a nurse, but friends and family sure as hell think you are

When friends or family talk about a possible medical condition and ask you to help them, you always have to remind them that you are not yet a nurse. Yet, they still want your opinion even though you have no idea if you are right or wrong. Nursing students are always receiving texts and calls from their friends that are being hypochondriacs or are sick.

11. More reading to do than reading the bible 7 times

There is no such thing as "finishing all of your reading." Teachers assign 4 chapter readings, let me remind you. One chapter is at least 50 pages of text book readings. Also, don't forget you have to outline all this reading because you know you are guaranteed to forget over half the stuff you have read.

12. Friends from nursing school are different from the rest

You can have all the best friends in the world but nothing compares to your nursing friends. They understand EVERYTHING you are going through. They know the struggle, the hardships, and the amount of stress each of you are under. I don't think it is possible to survive nursing school without them (shout out to Alexis and Jenna). They are there through every failure and every success.

13. Getting used to waking up while it's still dark for clinical

Every nursing student knows this struggle for sure and we might as well get used to it.

14. You hate bodily fluids? Might as well change your major

Nursing majors care and love more for other people that they are willing to clean up every single type of bodily fluid possible no matter what the situation. We are experts at wiping butt if you like it or not.

15. But...No matter what there is no other life we would chose

Nursing is not a career, it is a calling. It is the most amazing thing in this world there is to do. A nurse cares for someone else so much more than they do for themselves, and they don't even have to know the person. All the sweat, tears, blood, etc. are all worth it to us. "The best way to find yourself is in the service of others."

16. There is NO such thing as 'syllabus week'

Doesn't matter if your first class of the semester is one hour or if it is three hours there is never just a syllabus week. You are always staying the whole class and you are always beginning material.

17. Every week is finals week

Every week feels like finals week. The amount of stress and work due each week is overwhelming. But somehow we manage to get it done.

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14 Signs You Go To A Small School No One Has Ever Heard Of

"Your class size is what?!?"

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When most people are in high school, they look at all of the big schools that are known around the country. Schools like Rutgers, Ohio State, UCLA, University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University are often at the top of peoples' lists. Believe it or not, some people don't want to attend a huge college. If you're like me, you like having small class sizes where your professors get to know you and you always see someone you know when you're walking on campus.

Once you decide where you're going and become a student there, you constantly hear the same comments from people, whether they be good or bad- but you wouldn't want it any other way. Here are signs that you go to a small school that no one has ever heard of:

1. People always mess up your mascot

Rider University

"Broncs? Like the Denver Broncos?"

"No. Just the Broncs."

2. "Oh I've never heard of that. Where is it?"

3. "Wouldn't you rather go to *insert huge state school here*?"

The answer is always the same — nope.

4. You find people all the time who know or is related to someone who went to your school

"Oh, my cousin's friend went there!"

5. "Your class size is what?!?"

6. You've never had class in a lecture hall

Patricia M Guenther

Or class with more than 50 students.

7. When people come to visit, they can't believe how small your campus is compared to theirs

Well, at least we can get up 10 minutes before class starts instead of an hour to catch a bus.

8. Dining options are limited

Rider University

But you joke around and make the most of it, secretly hoping your campus will open a Panera or Chipotle like every other school.

9. People are amazed that you actually get to know your professors and the people in your classes, and that they get to know you

Not to mention that professors are a great reference for getting a job after graduation.

10. If you went to a big high school, your college isn't much bigger

Rider University

There are about 1,000 students per class, so only around 300-400 more students than you graduated high school with.

11. Your school doesn't have all of the big sports, like football

Jamie Lewkowitz

But hey, at least we're still undefeated!

12. When you get into your major classes, you always have the same people in them

13. You can't find anything with your school's logo on it, so constantly buy more apparel from the bookstore

Rider University

You walk out of there $100 poorer with a new sweatshirt, mug, and sweatpants that you didn't need.

14. You get really excited when someone has actually heard of your school

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