As Thanksgiving break comes to a close, it's time to start thinking about classes for next semester. Shopping for classes can be stressful, especially when there are so many interesting ones that don't meet at 9 a.m. I've taken the liberty of doing some of the hard work for you guys and picking some courses across many different fields that I think are worth considering.

1. CPSC 324 - Why isn't the WiFi working? Your grandparents were right; this is what computer science is actually all about. In this course, students will solve problems in the domain of canonical router theory, featuring case studies from Cisco Systems. For a final project, students will solve a real-world WiFi problem on campus.

2. PHIL 291b - Pondering. What does it mean to ponder? What does it mean to think about pondering? Can one ponder about pondering? Can one teach a whole course on pondering? What does it mean to teach a course? Readings include Locke, Descartes, Plato. Coursework includes weekly ponderings and final paper.

3. PHYS 103 / HUMS 103 - The Physics of Majoring in the Humanities. Exploration of concepts from classical mechanics with a focus on applications to majoring in the humanities. Topics include Newton's Laws of Motion as they pertain to works of useless literature, conservation of energy in the context of doing historical analysis, and angular momentum in the domain of flipping burgers. Final paper prompt: "Why we are all just boxes with arrows coming out of them."

4. THST 107 - Speaking Coherently for Engineering Majors. Public speaking theater practicum seminar designed for engineering majors. Topics include: speaking slowly, not mumbling, eye contact, "you're still mumbling, Jason," not looking like you'd rather be doing anything else than talking right now, personal hygiene, and Shakespeare. Counts as credit toward whatever distributional requirement you poor engineering folks still need.

5. MATH 7n2ζ - Introduction to Discrete Eulerian Quasi-Compact Manifold Theory. A Discrete Eulerian Quasi-Compact Manifold is a three-tuple consisting of a monad, a topological space, and an n-ary operation. They have some neat properties and you can prove stuff about them. Counts as credit toward majors in Mathematics and Ancient Greek.

6. MUSI 279 / SOCY 379 - The Music of Fetty Wap. Exploration of the musical, lyrical, and sociological significance of Wap's music in a broader cultural context. Weekly readings and listenings.

7. ENGL 194 / PLSC 194 / HIST 194 / BIOL 194 / EENG 194 / LING 194 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Everything. Everything is connected. Separating out academics into different fields prohibits a true understanding of the world. In this course, we will examine everything through all disciplines and demonstrate that complex concepts in any field can be eloquently explained at a cocktail party with only the most rudimentary understanding of that particular field.