56 Things to Do On A Mental Health Day

56 Things to Do On A Mental Health Day

We all need them, but we don't always do them right.
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An ideal mental health day is one where you feel productive without feeling stressed. You should go to bed at the end of the day feeling satisfied and refreshed, not lazy and gross after just sitting around all day. It's not necessarily about getting everything on your to-do list done. It is about small accomplishments and simple pleasures.

  1. Wake up before 10 a.m.
  2. Take a shower
  3. Shave
  4. Wear clothes you can breathe in
  5. Make your bed
  6. Eat a healthy breakfast
  7. Go somewhere as soon as possible after waking up, even if it’s just to get coffee.
  8. Avoid your bed except for sleep
  9. Do 50 sit-ups
  10. Draw a picture
  11. Call a family member
  12. Drink tea
  13. Open the windows
  14. Read a book



  15. Listen to happy music
  16. While cleaning
  17. Do laundry
  18. Log out of Facebook
  19. Play with a baby
  20. Or an animal
  21. Or a baby animal



  22. Run errands
  23. Eat out by yourself
  24. Try on outfits you've never worn
  25. Volunteer somewhere
  26. Hug someone you love
  27. Compliment a stranger
  28. Have a really good laugh



  29. Take a walk outside
  30. Buy a plant and water it
  31. Drink a glass of water every hour
  32. Sit by the water
  33. Take pictures
  34. Write in a journal
  35. Go for a drive with the windows down



  36. Do your nails
  37. Sort through your clothes
  38. Rearrange the furniture
  39. Stretch
  40. Make fresh iced tea
  41. Make a to-do list
  42. Go to the library



  43. Eat three full meals
  44. Smile at everyone
  45. Watch a stand-up routine
  46. Dance
  47. Catch up with someone
  48. Watch a documentary
  49. Meditate



  50. Go at least an hour without looking at a screen
  51. Write a letter
  52. Try a new recipe
  53. Stargaze
  54. Brush all the knots out of your hair
  55. Be naked for a while
  56. Go to bed before midnight



Cover Image Credit: psychologytoday.com

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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Burnout Doesn't Just Affect Those In The 'Helping' Professions

Burnout refers to stress and exhaustion and it is commonly felt by those in "helping" professions - doctors, nurses, and EMTs, but burnout can affect anyone, no matter their job, career, or college major.

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When I was a senior in high school, I did a project about burn-out in emergency medical technicians. My mom is an EMT, and I spent a lot of time with her at the station. I would help her and her partner disinfect, wash, and check the inventory of the ambulances while she was on shift. I would help them make dinner, which, sometimes, she would be called away from.

It wasn't always dinners she would be called away from though. Sometimes she's woken up in the middle of the night, called away to a scene. And they aren't always "walks in the park"; sometimes they're violent accidents - cars flipped on their sides in the ditch.

Even though I spent an entire semester of my high school career researching burn-outs for emergency medical technicians, I didn't realize burn-out could affect college students in similar ways.

I wish I had all of that research about burnout in EMTs still handy, but I remember vaguely that burnout is a major reason why EMTs don't last very long in their careers. Burnout is a serious issue.

At this point, if you're wondering what "burnout" is, it's a state of chronic stress that leads to physical and emotional exhaustion, cynicism and detachment, and feelings of lack of accomplishment.

Signs of emotional exhaustion include chronic fatigue; insomnia; forgetfulness/impaired concentration; increased illness; loss of appetite; anxiety; depression; and anger. More information can be found here.

Signs of cynicism and detachment include loss of enjoyment (which can be mild, like not wanting to go to class or being eager to leave, but it can quickly lead to all areas of your life, including the time you spend with family or friends), pessimism, and detachment).

Signs of lack of accomplishment include increased irritability, and lack of productivity and poor performance.

People also report having less investment in interpersonal relationships; this may be because people feel like they have less to offer, they have a diminished interest in having fun, or have less patience with people.

I know all of my friends are ready for spring break to get in gear. My friends have told me about their plans about visiting their boyfriend for the week, their family vacation to California, and so on, getting away from their stressors.

Last week I had a "mini-spring break" - I spent the weekend with my best friend. We laughed a lot, and I didn't spend a second worrying about homework. I got away for a little while, and last week I was pretty on top of my game.

This week? Not so much. It took me hours to come up with an article idea and executing it took over two hours. I have been struggling to do my homework and going to classes. I've been bogged down with all my "adulting responsibilities."

Burnout is a serious issue - it affects everybody from EMTs to college students. Remember the basics: get enough sleep, eat right, and exercise, are the first steps in getting back on track.

It's important to recognize what exactly is stressing you out. With that, writing down at least one way to modify that situation to reduce its stress, and implementing it into your routine. Psychology today recommends taking breaks between big projects, although I know as a college student that's not always an option. It also recommends controlling screen time.

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