10 Travel Tips For People Prone To Motion Sickness

10 Travel Tips For People Prone To Motion Sickness

You can survive the summer vacation season.
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Going to a school three hours away has its perks. You get to start fresh, be introduced to a new area you’re not familiar with, make friends from a completely different background and so much more. Unfortunately, it also has its downfalls. One negative is that I, a girl who has gotten extreme motion sickness over the past few years, has to take a four-hour bus ride following a one-hour car ride from the bus station. See, a bus ride is much different than a car ride. The bus is a lot bigger, which means it's a lot bumpier and doesn’t turn quite as smoothly. You don’t know what you’re going into with a bus ride either. You could end up with a seat to yourself, or be squished because some mom and her baby felt the need to sit next to you and your bulky backpack—a scenario I unfortunately know from experience). Again, getting motion sick easily is not ideal in any travel situation. As someone whose quickly learned how to deal with these scenarios, let me pass on some tips to make traveling easier, and to help you avoid the use of a barf bag.

1. Make Dramamine or Airborne your best friend.


Forget Motrin, Tums or anything else that’s designed to help with an upset stomach. These medicines are specifically designed to prevent motion sickness. I’ve never used Airborne, but I know people who prefer that to Dramamine because it’s a powder that goes into water, or another beverage of choice, rather than a chewable tablet or pill. You can find it in your local drug store or grocery store. Grab some of those and take it an hour before your departure. Precaution, though: it does not stop headaches, dizziness or any other non-stomach related symptoms of motion sickness.

2. Figure out what method of transportation you prefer.

It’s more than likely you have more than one way to get to your destination. Don’t feel as though you’re stuck taking a train if you prefer a plane, or vice versa. The key to motion sickness is figuring out which method of transportation causes the least trouble for you, and sticking to that. Personally, I prefer a car ride to anything else, because I know I can trust the driver of the car since I know them. Plus, that makes it possible for me to rest and not worry about anything, because I am with people I trust.

3. Get the window seat, if possible.

Just the idea of being trapped in a metal steel death trap for hours can make me sick, let alone being squished in between other people. When you get the window seat, you have somewhere to focus your eyes and energy on. You can just stare out the window and focus on the clouds, road signs or anything else to help prevent you from feeling sick.

4. Sleep is not for the weak.


Sleeping does not always come easy to people when they travel, but that doesn’t mean it’s not useful. Closing your eyes, even for a short nap, can make all the difference. It’s your body’s way of taking a break, focusing on something else besides the motion of the vehicle. This does not, however, always work for everyone. Some people feel as though the motion becomes more clear when they try and sleep, because that’s the main sense they have access to when sleeping. Take this tip with caution, because you know your body the best.

5. Stay hydrated and nourished.

You’d think the last thing you’d want to do is drink or eat en route, but a belly that is hungry or dehydrated is just as bad as one upset by travel. Of course, you should skip any dairy products, caffeine, high sugar products or anything too greasy. But some crackers and a bottle of water can go a long way with helping to calm an upset stomach.

6. Find comfort items


Whether you’re 6 or 60, there are items you own that give you comfort because you have them. It could be a blanket or stuffed animal, a jacket, your favorite phone case or even a lucky necklace. Keep that with you while you travel. Whenever you start to feel sick, hold it tight to help relax.

7. Avoid traditional entertainment options.

You know how when you’re bored at home, you have multiple options? You can watch TV or a movie, read a book, do a puzzle, play on your computer or phone, etc. You can’t do any of that when traveling. Sorry, but odds are it won’t help with your sickness. The idea of multitasking while ensuring you don’t throw up is a contradiction. Ditch the book for a verbal car game, some light discussion or a fun playlist on your phone.

8. Learn some breathing exercises.

It may sound crazy, but a lot of people who suffer from motion sickness also have travel anxiety! Who would have guessed that the people who get sick while traveling are worried about traveling?

Sarcasm aside, techniques often used during an anxiety attack may actually help to prevent sickness as well. Using your energy to focus on your breathing can not only help calm any fears you have, but also help calm your stomach in the process too.

9. Don’t be afraid to stop.

Whether you need to go use the bathroom a few times, pull over to get fresh air or walk around the bus/boat/train/plane, do it. You know what you need to do to comfort your body. If you can do it safely, do it. Disclaimer: Don’t walk around your car, that’s not going to end well.

10. Don’t be ashamed if you do get sick.

It happens. Sometimes no matter what you do, you still get sick in the end. Don’t feel bad if it does happen. Just own up to it, and make sure to clean up the mess. Sometimes, you just cannot prevent the inevitable.

Godspeed to all of you who get motion sick. We can survive our road trips, endless plane rides and monumental journeys this summer.

Cover Image Credit: Today Show

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To The Girl Who Hasn't Been Herself Lately

Your spark return, and you will shine like you were meant to.
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Life gets tough. Life gets too much to handle sometimes, and those times make you stronger. However, right now, it seems like you have lost yourself.

It’s difficult when you catch yourself not being you. When you do something or act a certain way and just wonder, “what did I do to deserve this? Why is this happening? When will it get better?” The way you’re feeling is not so much that you’re unhappy, you just feel weird.

Your day will come. I promise you. This is just a phase.

The day you realize how much you have grown from this point in time will be your reward. It is so hard to see now, and I feel your pain.

Your light will return to you. Your pure bliss moments, they are seeking you. Your laughter where your tummy aches is in your reach.

Our moods change far too often for us as humans to understand why, but the encounters you make every day have this effect on us.

You must remember the pure happiness you experienced before your first heartbreak, before the first friend became someone you thought they weren’t, before you lost your innocence. That was a time of true joy as you had not a care in the world for the things that would harm you. Better yet, you didn’t have the option to experience them because you were just a child.

The world can be an ugly place, and your attitude towards life can change every day. One thing is for certain: you did not lose who you are internally. We all put on a face for the world. For the people who we try to impress. For the life we want to live. For the things we want to achieve.

Your definitive personality is still in the works. Believe it or not, it always will be. Times like this change us for the better even though we can’t see it.

Your happiness will return. You will be a better, stronger version of you. In fact, you will be the best version of you yet.

Once this phase is over, you will be okay. This I promise you.

Cover Image Credit: Megan Sutton

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4 Realizations You Have After A Year Of Spending Two Hours A Day Commuting To And From College

Having a friendship with your car may sound odd, but when you spend almost two hours a day in it, you begin to form a bond.

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Although dorming seems like the best option for freshmen to get used to their new home for the next four years, it isn't the most appealing choice for everybody. When you're a homebody like me, the choice between commuting and dorming has a clear answer. Who would want to give up the comforts of home when they don't have to? However, there are some downsides to being away from campus. Having a 45-minute commute has taught me so much even though it has only been a week.

1. Your time management skills will improve drastically

When you commute, your day must be planned in order to avoid traffic and get home on time. You also have to schedule times to eat, do homework, and socialize. This being said, it is much more difficult to be spontaneous. Friends will make dinner plans or ask to hang out when you're already off campus on your way home. The fear of missing out is a real problem, but planning ahead of time still lets you have a social life.

2. Other people will pity you

Whenever I tell people about my commute, I always get words of pity. Of course, it seems disheartening, but you can't let that get to you. There are always pros and cons to everything, so thinking about the benefits of commuting rather than the downfalls will help you feel better about your drive.

3. Your car will become your best friend

Having a friendship with your car may sound odd, but when you spend almost 2 hours a day in it, you begin to form a bond. My car (named Ulysses) and I have been through a lot on the road. From rogue raccoons to crazy drivers on the highway, your car and you will have seen it all. Your car is your trusty steed that will bring you to school and home safely. As long as you trust your car, your car will trust you back.

4. It's nice to sleep in your own bed

At the end of the day, being home is where I feel the most comfortable. The feeling of your own bed and having the privacy of your own room really have their perks. Also, nothing in the dining halls can beat a homemade meal. Some days, I feel that I should've dormed and that commuting wasn't the best option, but being able to be where I feel my best makes the hassle of commuting worth it.

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