August is quickly arriving and move-in day is so close you can practically touch it, but you have one problem: the roommate. You're forced to live with a random stranger for an entire year (scary). What's your solution? Invest in some green friends (a.k.a. SUCCULENTS!). They're the latest social media trend - a perfect addition to any aesthetically-pleasing bedroom, outdoor patio or school desk. There are succulent accessories everywhere. Basically, everyone's a "cactushugger" now, which is why every incoming freshman should consider a succulent for their next dorm roommate. They're easy to take care of, don't require special attention and, best of all, you don't have to talk to them. Boom. Your roommate problem is solved.

1. Pincushion Cactus

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What's a succulent for if it isn't cute?! Pincushion cacti, named for their pincushion-like appearance, grow only to around 6 inches tall and are easy to take care of. They grow best in basic clay pots, so the water can properly drain. Be sure to let the soil dry up completely before you re-water this little guy! If you're lucky, your cactus will reward you with beautiful pink flowers in the spring.

2. Burro's Tail

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Burro's Tail, also called Burrito Sedum, is a delicate indoor or outdoor succulent that thrives in bright sun or shade (but not too sunny, or the plant will burn!). Water a Burro's Tail only once every 10 or so days, so you don't drown and kill the plant. It holds a lot of water within its leaves, which is why you don't have to drench it constantly! Once you find a home for the gentle plant, try not to move it around because the leaves can easily fall off.

3. Sansevieria

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Also called a snake plant, the Sansevieria is a succulent you can't kill. It can practically handle any conditions and doesn't require any special potting soil. The plant is known for its air-cleaning ability. Only water this plant ever 2 or 3 weeks - easy peasy.

4. String of Pearls

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This succulent will add a unique touch to your dorm room garden because of its interesting shape. Hang this plant from the ceiling or on a windowsill, so the beads can grow down over the edges of the pot. Above all, this succulent is a great conversation starter and totally Instagram-worthy.

5. Echeveria

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By far my favorite succulent of all time is the Echeveria because of its vibrant colors and "dusty" appearance. They are fairly simple to take care of and require little to no attention. If you want to add more of these plants to your dorm garden, you can pluck off a leaf and lay it on top of fresh soil. Soon the plant will grow its roots - voila! You become your hallway's go-to for plants.

6. Agave

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An agave plant? In your dorm room?! Yes, it is possible. Even though these plants enjoy a warm, Mediterranean climate, they can grow almost anywhere. Agave plants worship the sun and require watering only once or twice a week. Use two parts sand and one part compost for their soil to replicate their natural climate.

7. Hens and Chicks

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We're not talking about farm animals - Hens and Chicks are hardy, drought-resistant succulents. These succulents will multiple almost four times during a growing season. Start with a few seeds in a small pot and eventually transfer these plants to a large pot or your garden at home. After the plant flowers, chop off the dead flower section and allow for the chicks to spread. Little to no watering is needed for these guys!

8. Moon Cactus

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If you're obsessed with succulents even a little bit, you've probably seen this "Ruby Ball" cactus lying around gardening stores. They are red because they lack chlorophyll (a typical staple for plants that is necessary for photosynthesis). Moon Cacti are grafted onto other cacti in order to survive.

9. Jade Plant

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Jade Plants are fairly easy to take care of but require a bit more consideration than other succulents. Jade Plants can never completely dry out, or they may die - always water this plant once the top soil is dry (if you see spots on the plant that means it needs water!). Above all, be sure this plant is in full sun. The best place in your dorm room is on the windowsill.

10. Aeonium

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The best for last - this succulent is known for its rose-colored leaves and long stems. Picture-perfect rosettes are formed often with bright flowers in the center. These plants do not require a lot of soil, so they'll fit perfectly in small planters and pots (the best size for dorms!).