'As A Woman,' I Don't Need To Fit Your Preconceived Political Assumptions About Women

'As A Woman,' I Don't Need To Fit Your Preconceived Political Assumptions About Women

I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

129857
views

It is quite possible to say that the United States has never seen such a time of divisiveness, partisanship, and extreme animosity of those on different sides of the political spectrum. Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are saturated with posts of political opinions and are matched with comments that express not only disagreement but too often, words of hatred. Many who cannot understand others' political beliefs rarely even respect them.

As a female, Republican, college student, I feel I receive the most confusion from others regarding my political opinions. Whenever I post or write something supporting a conservative or expressing my right-leaning beliefs and I see a comment has been left, I almost always know what words their comment will begin with. Or in conversation, if I make my beliefs known and someone begins to respond, I can practically hear the words before they leave their mouth.

"As a woman…"

This initial phrase is often followed by a question, generally surrounding how I could publicly support a Republican candidate or maintain conservative beliefs. "As a woman, how can you support Donald Trump?" or "As a woman, how can you support pro-life policies?" and, my personal favorite, "As a woman, how did you not want Hillary for president?"

Although I understand their sentiment, I cannot respect it. Yes, being a woman is a part of who I am, but it in no way determines who I am. My sex has not and will not adjudicate my goals, my passions, or my work. It will not influence the way in which I think or the way in which I express those thoughts. Further, your mention of my sex as the primary logic for condemning such expressions will not change my adherence to defending what I share. Nor should it.

To conduct your questioning of my politics by inferring that my sex should influence my ideology is not only offensive, it's sexist.

It disregards my other qualifications and renders them worthless. It disregards my work as a student of political science. It disregards my hours of research dedicated to writing about politics. It disregards my creativity as an author and my knowledge of the subjects I choose to discuss. It disregards the fundamental human right I possess to form my own opinion and my Constitutional right to express that opinion freely with others. And most notably, it disregards that I am an individual. An individual capable of forming my own opinions and being brave enough to share those with the world at the risk of receiving backlash and criticism. All I ask is for respect of that bravery and respect for my qualifications.

Words are powerful. They can be used to inspire, unite, and revolutionize. Yet, they can be abused, and too comfortably are. Opening a dialogue of political debate by confining me to my gender restricts the productivity of that debate from the start. Those simple but potent words overlook my identity and label me as a stereotype destined to fit into a mold. They indicate that in our debate, you cannot look past my sex. That you will not be receptive to what I have to say if it doesn't fit into what I should be saying, "as a woman."

That is the issue with politics today. The media and our politicians, those who are meant to encourage and protect democracy, divide us into these stereotypes. We are too often told that because we are female, because we are young adults, because we are a minority, because we are middle-aged males without college degrees, that we are meant to vote and to feel one way, and any other way is misguided. Before a conversation has begun, we are divided against our will. Too many of us fail to inform ourselves of the issues and construct opinions that are entirely our own, unencumbered by what the mainstream tells us we are meant to believe.

We, as a people, have become limited to these classifications. Are we not more than a demographic?

As a student of political science, seeking to enter a workforce dominated by men, yes, I am a woman, but foremost I am a scholar, I am a leader, and I am autonomous. I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

Popular Right Now

6 Things You Should Know About The Woman Who Can't Stand Modern Feminism

Yes, she wants to be heard too.

101891
views

2018 is sort of a trap for this woman. She believes in women with all of the fire inside of her, but it is hard for her to offer support when people are making fools of themselves and disguising it as feminism.

The fact of the matter is that women possess qualities that men don't and men possess qualities that women don't. That is natural. Plus, no one sees men parading the streets in penis costumes complaining that they don't get to carry their own fetus for nine months.

1. She really loves and values women.

She is incredibly proud to be a woman.

She knows the amount of power than a woman's presence alone can hold. She sees when a woman walks into a room and makes the whole place light up. She begs that you won't make her feel like a "lady hater" because she doesn't want to follow a trend that she doesn't agree with.

2. She wants equality, too

She has seen the fundamental issues in the corporate world, where women and men are not receiving equal pay.

She doesn't cheer on the businesses that don't see women and men as equivalents. But she does recognize that if she works her butt off, she can be as successful as she wants to.

3. She wears a bra.

While she knows the "I don't have to wear a bra for society" trend isn't a new one, but she doesn't quite get it. Like maybe she wants to wear a bra because it makes her feel better. Maybe she wears a bra because it is the normal things to do... And that's OK.

Maybe she wants to put wear a lacy bra and pretty makeup to feel girly on .a date night. She is confused by the women who claim to be "fighting for women," because sometimes they make her feel bad for expressing her ladyhood in a different way than them.

4. She hates creeps just as much as you do. .

Just because she isn't a feminist does not mean that she is cool with the gruesome reality that 1 in 5 women are sexually abused.

In fact, this makes her stomach turn inside out to think about. She knows and loves people who have been through such a tragedy and wants to put the terrible, creepy, sexually charged criminals behind bars just as bad as the next woman.

Remember that just because she isn't a feminist doesn't mean she thinks awful men can do whatever they want.

5. There is a reason she is ashamed of 2018's version of feminism.

She looks at women in history who have made a difference and is miserably blown away by modern feminism's performance.

Not only have women in the past won themselves the right to vote, but also the right to buy birth control and have credit cards in their names and EVEN saw marital rape become a criminal offense.

None of them dressed in vagina costumes to win anyone over though... Crazy, right?

6. She isn't going to dress in a lady parts costume to prove a point.

This leaves her speechless. It is like the women around her have absolutely lost their minds and their agendas, only lessening their own credibility.

"Mom, what are those ladies on TV dressed up as?"

"Ummm... it looks to me like they are pink taco's honey."

She loves who she is and she cherished what makes her different from the men around her. She doesn't want to compromise who she is as a woman just so she can be "equal with men."

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

After An Already Unpredictable Year, Fall 2018 Has Farmers Wishing They Weren't In Kansas Anymore

Most farmers know to expect the unexpected, but how long do they have to withstand getting knocked off their feet?

246
views

After a long winter, unusual spring rainfall patterns and summer drought, farmers knew that their incomes in 2018 would be affected. The USDA even expected the farm sector net farm income in 2018 to decline $9.8 billion (13 percent) from 2017. Worse yet, the USDA predicted that "total production expenses, including operator dwellings, are forecast to increase $11.8 billion."

How is a farmer supposed to break even when production expenses increase, and their incomes decrease?

Farmers feed the world. But what happens when farmers can't feed their livestock or afford to plant crops? This is a question that all too many farmers, not just in Kansas, are having to ask themselves.

Unpredictable weather conditions increase how difficult it is for farmers to survive.

From December 25th, 2017 to January 8th, 2018 temperatures dropped to more than 25 degrees below normal in some areas. This can be devastating for livestock producers.

Colder temperatures mean that chores require added effort since water sources must be thawed. Even worse, imagine walking outside to see that a cow had her calf only for the calf to catch pneumonia or freeze to death.

Most farmers know to expect the unexpected, but how long do they have to withstand getting knocked off their feet?

After a dry, harsh winter, farmers faced unusual spring rainfall patterns. Farmers knew that if they didn't get rain in spring, the drought from 2017 would get worse in 2018. Unfortunately, what the farmers knew became true.

In July 2018, Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer updated the Drought Declaration for Kansas counties. This update had 50 counties in emergency status, 27 in warning status and 28 in watch status.

All 105 counties in Kansas were in drought or abnormally dry.

This led to livestock water and feed shortages, struggling crops and overall anxiety about how farmers would survive. Unfortunately, farmers should have been careful with what they wished for during this time.

Heavy rain hit parts of Kansas in September and caused flooding. Flooding that would kill crops and slow production since farmers couldn't walk in their fields without getting stuck, let alone replant crops using heavy machinery.

What farmers didn't know is that "fall" would continue to make things worse.

Fall, if you can even call it that, has seemed more like winter for Kansas farmers. Kansans were hit with unusually early snow October 15th that broke a record set 120 years ago for Kansas City.

Fall crops like soybeans were looking hopeful for farmers until unusual weather conditions led to harvest delays. To make things even worse, pod shattering can occur before soybeans are even harvested when there's alternation of dry and wet periods.

Since farmers haven't been able to harvest soybeans as anticipated, they haven't been able to plant some of their wheat as hoped.

The USDA sets final planting dates which are the dates when crops must be initially planted to be insured for the full production guarantee or amount of insurance per acre. Crops planted after these dates are in the "late planting period" and are ineligible for full insurance protection.

This means that farmers are losing money every day that they are unable to get into the fields. Consequently, many farmers are wondering what their next move should be. But one thing is certain.

After an already unpredictable year, fall 2018 has farmers wishing they weren't in Kansas anymore.

Related Content

Facebook Comments