Why We Don't Need A White History Month

Why We Don't Need A White History Month

Someone is bound to ask.
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"Racism is still alive, yellow tape and colored lines" - Kendrick Lamar

"Why isn't there a white history month?" I hear this question every year during black history month. Of course, the generic answer to this is "because every month is white history month." However, although this is a completely adequate response, the more important thing is that there does not need to be a white history month.


This simplified answer of why there doesn't need to be a white history month is much more complex. The creation of black history month was not intended to make people feel uncomfortable, but the fact that it does exposes deeper issues in society and racial culture. In today's media white is the racial default, for example in TV and movies there cannot be a cast of all colored people without it being considered a "black show," however if the cast is predominantly white it is not considered a "white show," rather just a regular show. The purpose of black history month is to create an open dialogue and discussion on racial issues as well as a broadening of education about achievements made by people of color.

History textbooks have been whitewashed in such a way that from start to finish the text focuses on the achievements of predominantly white men while leaving the history of minorities such as native americans, women, and people of color out. Their accomplishments and history are confined to a few chapters that discuss slavery, civil rights and suffrage. However, these under represented groups deserve recognition and their achievements should not be belittled based on race or gender.
No one learns about important African figures such as Crispus Attackus, a patriot who died in the Boston Massacre, but we all know Paul Revere. Men and women like Haile Selassie who led the independence movement in Africa, or Wengari Maathai who led to the restoration of democracy in many African countries are overlooked while men like Donald Trump are put in textbooks for doing nothing more than treating people poorly and being rich. There is more to America's history than the victimization of people of color and black history month should be a time to learn more about another culture and the achievements that these people have brought to society.
It is not racist to be proud of one's culture. Black history month, Hispanic heritage month, Asian Heritage month, and other months dedicated to minorities are not to exclude white people. Rather they are in place to share in other people's cultures and this education and expression of culture would not happen if these months were not put in place. There is nothing wrong with being proud of your culture and wanting to share it with the world. Just as saying "Black Lives Matter" does not mean that white lives don't matter, black history month does not mean that white people have not made significant and major contributions to the world.
Black history month was not made to segregate them from white people, rather it was made to celebrate achievements and a culture that otherwise would not be celebrated.

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6 Things You Should Know About The Woman Who Can't Stand Modern Feminism

Yes, she wants to be heard too.

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2018 is sort of a trap for this woman. She believes in women with all of the fire inside of her, but it is hard for her to offer support when people are making fools of themselves and disguising it as feminism.

The fact of the matter is that women possess qualities that men don't and men possess qualities that women don't. That is natural. Plus, no one sees men parading the streets in penis costumes complaining that they don't get to carry their own fetus for nine months.

1. She really loves and values women.

She is incredibly proud to be a woman.

She knows the amount of power than a woman's presence alone can hold. She sees when a woman walks into a room and makes the whole place light up. She begs that you won't make her feel like a "lady hater" because she doesn't want to follow a trend that she doesn't agree with.

2. She wants equality, too

She has seen the fundamental issues in the corporate world, where women and men are not receiving equal pay.

She doesn't cheer on the businesses that don't see women and men as equivalents. But she does recognize that if she works her butt off, she can be as successful as she wants to.

3. She wears a bra.

While she knows the "I don't have to wear a bra for society" trend isn't a new one, but she doesn't quite get it. Like maybe she wants to wear a bra because it makes her feel better. Maybe she wears a bra because it is the normal things to do... And that's OK.

Maybe she wants to put wear a lacy bra and pretty makeup to feel girly on .a date night. She is confused by the women who claim to be "fighting for women," because sometimes they make her feel bad for expressing her ladyhood in a different way than them.

4. She hates creeps just as much as you do. .

Just because she isn't a feminist does not mean that she is cool with the gruesome reality that 1 in 5 women are sexually abused.

In fact, this makes her stomach turn inside out to think about. She knows and loves people who have been through such a tragedy and wants to put the terrible, creepy, sexually charged criminals behind bars just as bad as the next woman.

Remember that just because she isn't a feminist doesn't mean she thinks awful men can do whatever they want.

5. There is a reason she is ashamed of 2018's version of feminism.

She looks at women in history who have made a difference and is miserably blown away by modern feminism's performance.

Not only have women in the past won themselves the right to vote, but also the right to buy birth control and have credit cards in their names and EVEN saw marital rape become a criminal offense.

None of them dressed in vagina costumes to win anyone over though... Crazy, right?

6. She isn't going to dress in a lady parts costume to prove a point.

This leaves her speechless. It is like the women around her have absolutely lost their minds and their agendas, only lessening their own credibility.

"Mom, what are those ladies on TV dressed up as?"

"Ummm... it looks to me like they are pink taco's honey."

She loves who she is and she cherished what makes her different from the men around her. She doesn't want to compromise who she is as a woman just so she can be "equal with men."

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The End Of The Walker Era: Wisconsin Chooses Divided Government

Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Evers will take over in Madison in January.

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I was reminded of the enmity of our politics in a peculiar way the other day. As one of but a handful of Midwestern transplants to the South, I normally take note when I recognize someone from my home region. Such was the case when I noticed a girl donning a Milwaukee Brewers baseball cap.

"Oh, so you're from Wisconsin?" I asked her, eager to engage on a hearty banter about cheese, beer, brats, and the like.

"No, but my dad is. We're celebrating the results of the Wisconsin governor's election."

A strange way to make a political statement indeed. After all, of all the things a Brewers cap could symbolize (they did just come one game short of the World Series after all) she had chosen politicization.

But the best part? As she had said, she wasn't from Wisconsin. She was from North Carolina.

Such are the attitudes that Gov. Scott Walker has managed to engender in his eight years in office. A polarizing figure that had already run the race three times before, becoming the first governor in American history to survive a recall attempt in 2012, Walker has garnered a special place in the heart of conservatives for standing up to unions, and a special contempt from Democrats for doing much the same.

But Walker's defeat in the most recent gubernatorial election is an indicator of a lot more than merely his actions. After all, Walker's signature piece of legislation that dismantled union power, Act 10, was signed into law his first year in office, 2011. Wisconsinites had attempted to punish him for doing so in the recall in 2012 and again during the general election in 2014. Both times they failed to do so.

No, Walker's defeat in the here and now is much more about the nationalization (or the newfound parliamentary nature of American politics as I recently saw a pundit point out) of his race and his state than any action taken by Walker himself. After all, Walker just recently inked a deal with the Taiwanese Foxconn to build a massive production plant in the southeastern Wisconsin area. Unemployment has been at record lows and the budget hasn't been a concern in virtually all of the Walker era.

No, Walker's defeat is, as much of American politics is, about Trump.

My colleague from North Carolina makes it apparent: there remains a deep displeasure with Walker in Wisconsin politics. And while this may have served his opponent, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Evers, with a magnificent starting point, it was hardly the sole reasoning of his downfall. Perhaps it was an unwillingness of Walker to stand up passionately to Trump (a fault of many modern Republicans), but independents turned on Walker this election cycle like they never had before.

And it wasn't just Wisconsin. Republican gubernatorial candidates in Michigan and Illinois, states where Republicans had held those seats, lost their bids too. Gov. Kim Reynolds of Iowa almost joined them. Walker's loss might be heralded by many a Milwaukee or Madison liberal as just comeuppance, but it's much bigger than that. It's all much bigger than that.

I'll make no equivocations. I was a supporter of Gov. Walker. In my eyes, he dismantled a politicized machine that served the Democratic Party more than it served Wisconsin workers. His right-to-work legislation, allowing workers to decide if they want to be in unions and not the other way around, was a huge win for individual liberty. The castle doctrine allows similar freedoms in giving citizens the ability of self-defense in their own homes. And now Foxconn will soon begin operations, a massive contributor to employment in Wisconsin.

Granted, none of these measures come without controversy, but I think it is difficult to say that Wisconsin is not better in terms of personal and economic freedom now then it was prior to Walker's administration.

But so, things ebb and flow. There was every possibility that Walker would lose, just as there is every possibility that Governor-elect Evers will lose in 2022. Such is the nature of the democratic process. But for now, with a still Republican-controlled legislature, the people of Wisconsin have chosen a house divided.

Let's hope we can keep moving forward.

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