To White Males Who Still Support Trump

To White Males Who Still Support Trump

Your hypocrisy blinds you from seeing the truth.
206
views

During this past election cycle, it seemed unanimous among my female and POC friend groups that Trump was awful, and most of what he wanted to do once in office would be terrible. However, among my group of white, male straight friends, most didn't really seem to mind him being in office, and some even wholeheartedly supported him. Now, 8 months later, even after all the fiascos that have happened, Trump still has the support of many young, white men. Why? My hypothesis is that they lack a fundamental grasp on the basic concepts of sympathy.

As a white male, you probably haven't faced much opposition. You've never had to earn respect, and have had it fairly easily given to you. If you were in a situation where you worked for respect, it probably came quicker compared to your female/POC classmates or coworkers. You've never feared your safety while walking home alone at night, or if you were being paid fairly. You've never questioned your ability to land a job in fear of your racial background. This lack of conflict based on your ethnic background and gender has led you to believe that everyone has experienced life with the same ease as you, and that if people are denied opportunities, it is simply because they haven't worked hard enough.

Then Trump comes into office, and continues with her tirade of rants about working, middle class America. You agree with his comments. After all, all you have to do in America is find a job and work and you can be successful, right? Never mind that some people have to work twice as hard to get the same kind of acknowledgment for their hard work as you. Your efforts are praised, while the efforts of millions of other Americans is expected. If people are on welfare, its because they're all lazy and love mooching off the government, even if people in your own family have relied/currently rely on government assistance, its different because its YOUR family. YOUR blood. It must be everyone else who's lazy and entitled for asking for help, right? Grammy can use all the Medicaid she wants because she needs it, but if someone's abuela down the street also needs help, she's just a stupid, filthy illegal trying to take advantage of the government.

What many young white guys suffer from is the plague of hypocrisy. They excuse the problematic things they do or their family does by saying its okay, but if another family does the same they're trash. They see the world through one perspective, and struggle to empathize with others. If someone disrespects their mother or sister, they threaten to kill them, but if a female friend tells them they were assaulted, its because they were asking for it. If one of their white friends is harassed by a cop, there's an uproar, but if an African American is harassed, it was because they were not complying.

I am tired of the close mindedness of my male, white friends. I am tired of them seeing the world from the perspective of one color and one gender. If you are a white male and still support Trump, open your eyes. Talk to people. Put yourself in another's shoes, and commit yourself to empathy. Caring is not a weakness, and their is strength in trying to understand another's viewpoint and doing anything you can to help them if they are in need. The world is not made for straight white men, and not everything is about you. Care for others. Listen intensely, and listen before you judge.

Cover Image Credit: hd.se

Popular Right Now

An Open Letter To Democrats From A Millennial Republican

Why being a Republican doesn't mean I'm inhuman.
56943
views

Dear Democrats,

I have a few things to say to you — all of you.

You probably don't know me. But you think you do. Because I am a Republican.

Gasp. Shock. Horror. The usual. I know it all. I hear it every time I come out of the conservative closet here at my liberal arts university.

SEE ALSO: What I Mean When I Say I'm A Young Republican

“You're a Republican?" people ask, saying the word in the same tone that Draco Malfoy says “Mudblood."

I know that not all Democrats feel about Republicans this way. Honestly, I can't even say for certain that most of them do. But in my experience, saying you're a Republican on a liberal college campus has the same effect as telling someone you're a child molester.

You see, in this day and age, with leaders of the Republican Party standing up and spouting unfortunately ridiculous phrases like “build a wall," and standing next to Kim Davis in Kentucky after her release, we Republicans are given an extreme stereotype. If you're a Republican, you're a bigot. You don't believe in marriage equality. You don't believe in racial equality. You don't believe in a woman's right to choose. You're extremely religious and want to impose it on everyone else.

Unfortunately, stereotypes are rooted in truth. There are some people out there who really do think these things and feel this way. And it makes me mad. The far right is so far right that they make the rest of us look bad. They make sure we aren't heard. Plenty of us are fed up with their theatrics and extremism.

For those of us brave enough to wear the title “Republican" in this day and age, as millennials, it's different. Many of us don't agree with these brash ideas. I'd even go as far as to say that most of us don't feel this way.

For me personally, being a Republican doesn't even mean that I automatically vote red.

When people ask me to describe my political views, I usually put it pretty simply. “Conservative, but with liberal social views."

“Oh," they say, “so you're a libertarian."

“Sure," I say. But that's the thing. I'm not really a libertarian.

Here's what I believe:

I believe in marriage equality. I believe in feminism. I believe in racial equality. I don't want to defund Planned Parenthood. I believe in birth control. I believe in a woman's right to choose. I believe in welfare. I believe more funds should be allocated to the public school system.

Then what's the problem? Obviously, I'm a Democrat then, right?

Wrong. Because I have other beliefs too.

Yes, I believe in the right to choose — but I'd always hope that unless a pregnancy would result in the bodily harm of the woman, that she would choose life. I believe in welfare, but I also believe that our current system is broken — there are people who don't need it receiving it, and others who need it that cannot access it.

I believe in capitalism. I believe in the right to keep and bear arms, because I believe we have a people crisis on our hands, not a gun crisis. Contrary to popular opinion, I do believe in science. I don't believe in charter schools. I believe in privatizing as many things as possible. I don't believe in Obamacare.

Obviously, there are other topics on the table. But, generally speaking, these are the types of things we millennial Republicans get flack for. And while it is OK to disagree on political beliefs, and even healthy, it is NOT OK to make snap judgments about me as a person. Identifying as a Republican does not mean I am the same as Donald Trump.

Just because I am a Republican, does not mean you know everything about me. That does not give you the right to make assumptions about who I am as a person. It is not OK for you to group me with my stereotype or condemn me for what I feel and believe. And for a party that prides itself on being so open-minded, it shocks me that many of you would be so judgmental.

So I ask you to please, please, please reexamine how you view Republicans. Chances are, you're missing some extremely important details. If you only hang out with people who belong to your own party, chances are you're missing out on great people. Because, despite what everyone believes, we are not our stereotype.

Sincerely,

A millennial Republican

Cover Image Credit: NEWSWORK.ORG

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

2020 Democrats Need To Stick Together If They Don't Want A Repeat Of 2016

Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

353
views

With a sufficient amount of democratic hopefuls, one of the largest problems in the party is actually choosing one. In the 2016 election, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton were two household names that circled about. However, even after it became statistically improbably for Sanders to win the Democratic primary, he did not back down. He continued to campaign, which led to divisions in the party and might have been the reason to why the Democrats lost the election. Obviously, we have to learn from the past with the upcoming 2020 election.

Parties do better when they stick together.

When there is a division within the party, the votes get divided ultimately giving the win to the competing party. In the 2016 election, Democrats were strongly divided to a point that they were willing to vote for the Republican candidate rather than the other Democratic candidate (which did happen). Some Sanders supporters were unwilling to vote for Clinton just because it was her. They ended up voting for Trump since he wasn't Hillary. We know how that all worked out.

Democrats have to stick together and not become a hindrance to each other.

Although the candidate you were rooting for didn't win the primaries, they still share more ideals than the opposing party does. Elections are becoming more candidate-centric than party-centric which is quite concerning. Candidates have personal interests in mind and could change them on a whim. Parties have an established party platform that does change but only changes every four years.

Democrats don't want to relive what happened in the 2016 elections again.

With the high number of candidates running for the Democratic ballot, the fear of 2016 occurring again is high. Many of the candidates are extremely qualified and have dedicated voters that might put the candidate before the party. Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

Related Content

Facebook Comments