If You Identify As "Pro-Life" Please Really Support Life

If You Identify As 'Pro-Life' Please Really Support Life

If the reasoning behind bans on women being able to control their own bodies is "protection of life" then let's really start protecting life.

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My frustrations with the recent abortion bans and criminalization have brought me to think a lot about what I can do in response. The narrative of protecting women's right to their own lives and their own decision-making simply isn't enough and it still is not working. I think we need to be more creative in our appeals to those who disagree with us because it takes a lot to reason with someone who does not have the same beliefs as you. So, I've decided that if we are going to pass this part of the pro-life agenda, let's make all of our legislation in support of human life.

Starting with maternal and child health during childbirth, the United States has a ridiculously high infant mortality rate for a developed country. The United States also has the highest rate of maternal deaths during pregnancy in the developed world. Perhaps we need to enact legislation to research why this is and to prevent the deaths of many mothers and children during childbirth. It is completely unreasonable that a developed country should have the lapse in childbirth care that the United States has, so why wouldn't legislators want to save the lives of all of those mothers and children?

Next comes healthcare insurance. If we're protecting the lives of unborn children, we must also protect the lives of children who have already been born, which means giving their families access to quality health insurance. Without sufficient healthcare people across the United States face unnecessary deaths. 2018 congressional candidate Amy Vilela experienced this phenomenon first hand when her daughter passed away after being refused medical care because their family did not have health insurance.

What about gun laws? With the number of Americans regularly dying from gun violence. It seems unrealistic to save unborn children but not protect children in our school systems from death. Legislators need to prioritize preventing unsafe individuals from obtaining guns and placing restrictions on when and where individuals can carry firearms. We should be protecting the lives of children beyond the day they are born, ensuring that they will not be killed by people who have unrestricted access to weapons.

There are hundreds of other issues, from federally funded childcare and early education to better public schools to stopping childhood hunger, to pulling single mothers out poverty. It is unrealistic to claim care for young children when, legislatively, there is no care for them once they are actually born. If the pro-life community wants to prove to women that they aren't simply trying to control an entire gender, they need to pass legislation that protects children at all stages of life. I am always a supporter of giving children a better life, but it doesn't make sense to force them into a world that gives them little chance at a life of comfort and opportunity. Let's create a world that women want to bring children into and that they can afford to bring children into before we restrict their ability to control their own fate.

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21 Things You Say To Your Roommate If You Two Are Practically A Married Couple

Until I made this list, I didn't realize how absurdly close my roommate and I were. #sorrynotsorry
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Let's be real: you and your roommate have said these things at least one to each other.

1. "Can you turn the light off?"

2. "We probably shouldn't go out for dinner again...right?"

*Complains about not having money* *Spends $8 on Chipotle three times a week*

3. "I always pick where we go"

This is a fight you have with your roommate almost every day when you're roommate is as indecisive as mine.

4. "Do you have my keys?"

5. "Can you pick me up?"

6. "Is it hot in here?"

7. "Does this outfit look stupid?"

The answer is usually yes. No offense.

8. "Can you throw this out for me?"

9. "Can we get ice cream?"

10. "I need coffee."

This text is usually sent when you know your roomie is out running errands... errands you know are near a Starbucks.

11. "Can you tell me what happened?"

12. "Are you asleep?"

There have been times where I couldn't tell if you were asleep or dead... and I had to say this out loud to check if you were alive.

13. "Check your DM's."

*Cracks up in the middle of nowhere* *Catches a weird stare from your roomie across the room*

14. "Can you plug this in for me?"

15. "Can you pick a movie?"

Another instance where "I always pick" happens.

16. "Look at this girl's Instagram."

*Chucks phone across the room at roommate*

17. "Can you call me?"

18. "Can we meet up?"

19. "Can you help me find my phone?"

*Tries to leave the house to do something* *Loses phone* Every. Time.

20. "What should we do tonight?"

*Tries to get ready to do something fun* *Ends up staying in for another girls' night*

21. "Why isn't everyone as great as us?"

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Cover Image Credit: Juliarose Genuardi

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Pride? Pride.

Who are we? Why are we proud?

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This past week, I was called a faggot by someone close to me and by note, of all ways. The shock rolled through my body like thunder across barren plains and I was stuck paralyzed in place, frozen, unlike the melting ice caps. My chest suddenly felt tight, my hearing became dim, and my mind went blank except for one all-encompassing and constant word. Finally, after having thawed, my rage bubbled forward like divine retribution and I stood poised and ready to curse the name of the offending person. My tongue lashed the air into a frenzy, and I was angry until I let myself break and weep twice. Later, I began to question not sexualities or words used to express (or disparage) them, but my own embodiment of them.

For members of the queer community, there are several unspoken and vital rules that come into play in many situations, mainly for you to not be assaulted or worse (and it's all too often worse). Make sure your movements are measured and fit within the realm of possible heterosexuality. Keep your music low and let no one hear who you listen to. Avoid every shred of anything stereotypically gay or feminine like the plague. Tell the truth without details when you can and tell half-truths with real details if you must. And above all, learn how to clear your search history. At twenty, I remember my days of teaching my puberty-stricken body the lessons I thought no one else was learning. Over time I learned the more subtle and more important lessons of what exactly gay culture is. Now a man with a head and social media accounts full of gay indicators, I find myself wondering both what it all means and more importantly, does it even matter?

To the question of whether it matters, the answer is naturally yes and no (and no, that's not my answer because I'm a Gemini). The month of June has the pleasure of being the time of year when the LGBT+ community embraces the hateful rhetoric and indulges in one of the deadly sins. Pride. Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, the figures at the head of the gay liberation movement, fought for something larger than themselves and as with the rest of the LGBT+ community, Pride is more than a parade of muscular white men dancing in their underwear. It's a time of reflection, of mourning, of celebration, of course, and most importantly, of hope. Pride is a time to look back at how far we've come and realize that there is still a far way to go.

This year marks fifty years since the Stonewall Riots and the gay liberation movement launched onto the world stage, thus making the learning and embracing of gay culture that much more important. The waves of queer people that come after the AIDS crisis has been given the task of rebuilding and redefining. The AIDS crisis was more than just that. It was Death itself stalking through the community with the help of Regan doing nothing. It was going out with friends and your circle shrinking faster than you can try or even care to replenish. Where do you go after the apocalypse? The LGBT+ community was a world shut off from access by a touch of death and now on the other side, we must weave in as much life as we can.

But we can't freeze and dwell of this forever. It matters because that's where we came from, but it doesn't matter because that's not where we are anymore. We're in a time of rebirth and spring. The LGBT+ community can forge a new identity where the AIDS crisis is not the defining feature, rather a defining feature to be immortalized, mourned, and moved on from.

And to the question of what does it all mean? Well, it means that I'm gay and that I've learned the central lesson that all queer people should learn in middle school. It's called Pride for a reason. We have to shoulder the weight of it all and still hold our head high and we should. Pride is the LGBT+ community turning lemons into lemon squares and limoncello. The lemon squares are funeral cakes meant to mourn and be a familiar reminder of what passed, but the limoncello is the extravagant and intoxicating celebration of what is to come. This year I choose to combine the two and get drunk off funeral cakes. Something tells me that those who came before would've wanted me to celebrate.

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