what DOESN'T MATTER - DCP edition

what DOESN'T MATTER - DCP edition

comparing yourselves to others just gives you more anxiety
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It DOESN'T MATTER when you apply

Everyone moves at their own pace and timeline. The applications for the DCP is open for at least a couple of months, allowing everyone a chance to apply. Just because you apply on the first day doesn’t mean you’ll be one of the first people to get accepted. Everyone who applies goes at their own timeline. No use to compare yours to others.

It DOESN’T MATTER when you had your phone interview

Everyone does their phone interview at their own convenience. The recruiters who are interviewing you make notes, they do not make the final decisions of your acceptance, role and location.

It DOESN’T MATTER when you did your WBI

When you get selected to do the Web-Based Interview you have the option to do it within 3 days after you’ve received the email for the WBI. It will automatically tell you at the end of the interview if you have been selected for a phone interview or not.

It DOESN’T MATTER if you upload a resume or not for the Disney College Program.

The Disney College Program description on the disney careers website states that it is not required to upload a resume. Nor is it a really big deciding factor for your application. There has been so many students with little to no work experience who’s been accepted so it is not a huge deal breaker.

It DOESN’T MATTER if you have been an alumnus of the DCP before

There has been many alumni time and time again who has not been able to get back into the program. It doesn’t really give them as much advantage as you think. The only advantage that they have is if they remember the questions they were asked last time, but even then not all recruiters ask the same questions at every interview.

It DOESN’T MATTER who your interviewer was

Everyone gets interviewed, but who you interviewed with does not hold any significant impact on your acceptance, your role and location. Those particular Cast Members who interview you have one job and that is to make sure you get your phone interview right on schedule at your convenience, ask you questions pertaining about the living situation, disney look, any number of roles and if you had any questions of the program at that point. They do not make the final decisions, they take notes and that’s it.

It DOESN’T MATTER what time of day you apply for the DCP

I know it’s crazy that I had to even list this. For some reason people think that time you apply for the DCP actually matters, it really doesn’t. It goes through a computer system that handles the initial applications, and thats all we actually know about it.

It DOESN’T MATTER how fast someone gets their email

People needs to understand that these emails that everyone gets takes time to actually go through. If you think about it only about 5 to 6k of college kids get accepted every semester, but how many people actually apply initially? It takes at the least 30 mins to 24 hours to receive certain email notifications like scheduling for a phone interview, getting accepted and etc. If you were on the roster to receive an email from Disney, it will take time for it to get to you. They have to email hundreds to thousands of students, it will take time to get to you.

It DOESN’T MATTER what letter your name starts with

For some odd reason, people think that whenever DCP sends out emails that it is by alphabetical order. To be honest, no one knows what order these emails get sent out by. Sure doesn’t go by alphabetical order.

Cover Image Credit: twitter.com

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I'm That Girl With A Deep Voice, But I'm Not Some Freak Of Nature

I have learned to hold back tears when someone tells me that I sound like a man.

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My voice is deep. Always has been, always will be. I joke that rather than getting higher, my voice got lower throughout puberty.

My voice is deep. Always has been, always will be. I have learned to laugh when my family members say "Hi Todd" when they pick up the phone when I call. Todd is my brother. I am a girl.

My voice is deep. Always has been, always will be. I have learned to laugh when I have been asked by other females if they're "in the right bathroom" when I tell them "I'm not in line" or "someone's in here" when there's a knock on the stall.

Keep in mind that in most female bathrooms, there are no urinals present and there is a sign outside the door that says "WOMEN." Quite obviously, they're in the correct bathroom, just thrown off by the octave of my voice.

For the girl who asked me if she was in the right bathroom because she was "caught off guard and thought I was a boy," I'm just wondering...

What part about my long hair, mascara, shorts not down to my knees, presence (small presence, but a presence none the less) of boobs, and just my overall demeanor was not enough validation that you are, in fact, in the correct restroom?

My voice is deep. Always has been, always will be. I have learned to hold back tears when someone tells me that I sound like a man. Or, when someone calls me over to talk to their friends so they can see how "offsetting" my voice sounds to them.

My favorite story is when I was in a store, and I asked one of the women there a question about a product.

This woman had the audacity to ask me when I "went through my transformation."

She was suggesting that I was a transgender girl because of the sound of my voice. Please recognize that I respect and wholeheartedly accept the trans- population. Please also recognize that I was born a girl, still am a girl, always will be a girl, and asking someone if they are a different gender than they appear to be is not the best way to make a sale.

Frustrated, I told her that she should find a better plastic surgeon and walked out.

My voice is deep. Always has been, always will be.

And, to make matters worse, I am not your typical "girly-girl."

I die for the New York Rangers, have maybe two dresses in my closet but three shelves full of hand-me-down sweatshirts from my brother and Adidas pants. I do not own a "blouse" nor do I plan on owning one except maybe for business-casual occasions.

Naturally, when a deep voice is paired with a sports-oriented, athletic short-loving, sarcastic girl who couldn't tell you the difference between a stiletto and an average high-heel, I GUESS things can seem "off." However, regardless of the difference you see/hear, no one has the right to make someone feel bad about themselves.

What I always struggled with the most is how (most, moral, common-sense) people will never tell someone they don't know, who may be overweight, that "they're fat" or that they don't like the shirt that they're wearing. Yet, because my voice is not something physically seen, it has become fair game for strangers and acquaintances alike to judge and make comments about.

I used to break down into hysterics when I heard a comment about my voice, whether I was six years old or seventeen years old.

There are times that I still do because I am so fed up and just completely bamboozled by the fact that at the age of twenty, there are still people who just have a blatant disregard for others' feelings and a lack of understanding of what is okay to say and what is not okay to say.

But, just like I ask those people not to judge me, I suppose I can't judge them on their lack of common sense and respect for others.

I'd be lying if I said that the hundreds of thousands of comments I've heard and received targeted at my voice growing up did not play a role in my life. I used to want to be a sports broadcaster. I no longer want to be heard on the radio or seen on TV; snarky comments about my voice being one of the reasons why (among others, like a change of interest and just overall life experiences).

I'd be lying if I said that my struggle with public speaking didn't partially stem from negative feedback about my voice.

I'd be lying if I said that there weren't days I tried to talk as little as possible because I didn't want to be judged and that I am sometimes hesitant to introduce myself to new people because I'm scared my voice will scare them away.

I would also be lying if I said that my voice didn't make me who I am.

I joke constantly about it now, because half the shit that comes out of my mouth mixed with my actions, interests, beliefs, etc., would sound absolutely WHACK if I had a high-pitched "girly" voice.

My voice matches my personality perfectly, and the criticism I have and continue to receive for my "manly" sounding voice has helped shaped me into who I am today. I have learned to love my voice when people have relentlessly tried to make me hate it. I have learned to take the frustration I felt towards my voice and turn it into sympathy for those who have something going on in their life, and therefore feel compelled to make a comment about me, a stranger's voice, to make themselves feel better.

I've learned that to laugh at yourself is to love yourself.

And, I say this not for sympathy. Not for someone to say, "Wait, Syd, I love your voice!"

I say this because I want it to be a reminder for people to watch what they say, and use that noggin before you speak. I say this because I also want to be the voice (haha, get it, 'voice') for those who feel like they've lost theirs.

My voice is deep. Always has been, always will be. And I wouldn't have it any other way.

So no, I would not be a good alto in a choir because I think I'm tone deaf. And, when you call MY phone number, it is very unlikely that it is my brother or dad answering. Just say hello, because 99.9% of the time, if it's ME you're calling, it's ME that's answering.

Dr. Suess said, "A person's a person no matter how small."

Now I'm saying, "A girl is a girl no matter her octave."

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To The Parents Who Just Became 'Empty Nesters,' Be Proud Of The Children You Raised Right

Here's to a brand new chapter of your life.

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Dear Empty Nesters,

First of all, congratulations! You must be feeling a variety of emotions as you realize that your house is no longer filled with the commotion of kids. On one hand, there must be this sense of relief; you have successfully survived one of the hardest aspects of parenting: the first 18 years of the child's life. Alternatively, you may also have some feelings of slight sadness as you realize that the children you have nurtured, taught, inspired, bathed, provided for, taken care of, argued with, listened to and watched develop over the years are no longer residing in the same place as you.

There is also probably an unending sense of pride as you can now sit back and watch your offspring take on the challenges of the real world semi-independently. That is your kid out there doing that; how exciting. Finally, there must also be an overwhelming sense of wonderment as you ponder "now what?" as the dynamics of your house change. No matter what you are feeling, always remember to embrace those thoughts and acknowledge them, but try not to ruminate over the ideas that come about. Memories and the emotions that are inflicted by those memories are important to an extent, but when they begin to infringe upon your ability to move forward and create new memories or feel new emotions, then it becomes a problem. Always remain mindful.

Please take some time to re-evaluate what defines your purpose in life. In the past, a large portion of your identity and purpose was to be a mother or father. This still holds true; just because your kids are gone does not mean that you have completed your duty as a parent rather, it is just that the nature of that responsibility has shifted.

Your time commitment is different now too. Gone are the days when you have to drive your kids to extracurriculars, attend school programs, help with homework, deal with school drama, throw birthday parties, coordinate social events and actively teach important life lessons to your kids. Now they are off on their own, coordinating their own schedules that you sometimes are a part of. Thus, take this time that used to be set aside as primarily for your kids for yourself.

For so long, you have relentlessly put your kids' wellbeing over your own; due to that reason, and many others, your kids are eternally grateful (even if they do not always seem like it). All of the selfless sacrifices you have made for your kids did not go unnoticed; however, now is an opportunity for you to prioritize your own wellbeing. Return to a hobby that has made you feel excited or try something entirely new. Implement acts of self-care into your daily routine.

Truly take pride in your occupation, if you have one. If not, perhaps apply for a new job or find a place to begin volunteering. Most importantly, fortify the relationship between you and your partner; after all, the two of you are some of the biggest reasons why your kids have made it this far and are off exploring the capacious world we live in.

Here's to the parents that have recently been deemed "empty nesters." Thank you for your time commitment, genuine thoughtfulness, financial support and unconditional love that you have provided relentlessly while your home was full of the hustle and bustle of raising children. The young adults who are making their way through the world would not be where they are today without you.

I hope you enjoy this next chapter of your life because you definitely deserve to.

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