I'll Be Vaccinating My Future Children, Here's Why You Should, Too

I'll Be Vaccinating My Future Children, Here's Why You Should, Too

They'll have a sore arm for a few days, but at least they won't get polio.

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Come flu season, there are several precautions that I begin taking to avoid getting sick. I was my hands as often as possible, especially when I'm at school or work where I come into contact with a lot of germs. Whenever I feel like I've run into someone who is sick, I pop a few vitamin C tablets for the following few days to help out my body. On top of that, I make sure to eat healthily and stay hydrated so I don't get worn down.

Oh, and I get a flu shot.

Why? Because vaccinations are an important part of protecting ourselves against many preventable diseases. Seasonal vaccinations like the flu shot help to prevent more of our population from suffering from hospitalizations and flu-related complications.

Vaccines are one of the most incredible medical breakthroughs we have. When you receive a vaccination, you are teaching your immune system how to fight a possible infection by training your immune cells to recognize antigens. For example, one kind of flu vaccine contains viruses that have been killed and are not infectious. Your immune system cannot tell that they are inactive, and will still treat the "invading virus" like it would a live one. Your B and T cells create a small and powerful army to engulf the inactive virus and learn from the experience. That way, if any live flu viruses enter your system, your immune system will be ready to go on offense right away.

Influenza can be scary, but we also have a dozen other preventable diseases that can be stopped by vaccinations. The prevalence of polio, measles, whooping cough and more can be lowered when we vaccinate our children at a young age.

Even if you've never heard of a case of measles occurring in your town, all it takes is one person traveling through the area to spread infection. While it is rare in our country, measles is common around the world and unvaccinated travelers can bring the disease back home with them. In the first six months of 2018 alone, a reported 107 people in 21 states were infected with measles and almost all of them were unvaccinated.

Do you care about your community? Do you want to see your friends and family stay healthy? Then having your children vaccinated can help out with that. There are certain people who unfortunately can't receive vaccines such as newborn babies and those with diseases that compromise their immune systems. They rely on the rest of their community to stay vaccinated to avoid preventable diseases from being around them. In order to protect us all, we just need to ensure the new generation gets their vaccinations.

Medical professionals are aware of the concerns parents have for their children. They know how scary it can be to put something into your child's body that you might not fully understand. They may not share the love you have for your child, but they are fully invested in seeing your child grow up healthy and strong. Before vaccines are approved for use, they undergo rigorous testing. Nothing but the absolute best passes through these checkpoints. You can rest assured knowing that each vaccination your child needs is safe and well-regulated.

One day, when I have children, I'll make sure they're as safe as I can make them. Electrical outlets within their reach will be covered, their car seats will be up to standard, and they'll wear helmets when they learn to ride a bike. In order for me to be sure my children will reach the age where they can ride a bike though, I'll be making sure they receive all the vaccinations the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends.

If I can prevent my kids from accidental electrocution and bumps on the head when they ride a bike, I can prevent serious childhood diseases. They'll still skin their knees and get in all kinds of trouble, but at least they won't get polio.

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30 Things I'd Rather Be Than 'Pretty'

Because "pretty" is so overrated.
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Nowadays, we put so much emphasis on our looks. We focus so much on the outside that we forget to really focus on what matters. I was inspired by a list that I found online of "Things I Would Rather Be Called Instead Of Pretty," so I made my own version. Here is a list of things that I would rather be than "pretty."

1. Captivating

I want one glance at me to completely steal your breath away.

2. Magnetic

I want people to feel drawn to me. I want something to be different about me that people recognize at first glance.

3. Raw

I want to be real. Vulnerable. Completely, genuinely myself.

4. Intoxicating

..and I want you addicted.

5. Humble

I want to recognize my abilities, but not be boastful or proud.

6. Exemplary

I want to stand out.

7. Loyal

I want to pride myself on sticking out the storm.

8. Fascinating

I want you to be hanging on every word I say.

9. Empathetic

I want to be able to feel your pain, so that I can help you heal.

10. Vivacious

I want to be the life of the party.

11. Reckless

I want to be crazy. Thrilling. Unpredictable. I want to keep you guessing, keep your heart pounding, and your blood rushing.

12. Philanthropic

I want to give.

13. Philosophical

I want to ask the tough questions that get you thinking about the purpose of our beating hearts.

14. Loving

When my name is spoken, I want my tenderness to come to mind.

15. Quaintrelle

I want my passion to ooze out of me.

16. Belesprit

I want to be quick. Witty. Always on my toes.

17. Conscientious

I want to always be thinking of others.

18. Passionate

...and I want people to know what my passions are.

19. Alluring

I want to be a woman who draws people in.

20. Kind

Simply put, I want to be pleasant and kind.

21. Selcouth

Even if you've known me your whole life, I want strange, yet marvelous. Rare and wondrous.

22. Pierian

From the way I move to the way I speak, I want to be poetic.

23. Esoteric

Do not mistake this. I do not want to be misunderstood. But rather I'd like to keep my circle small and close. I don't want to be an average, everyday person.

24. Authentic

I don't want anyone to ever question whether I am being genuine or telling the truth.

25. Novaturient

..about my own life. I never want to settle for good enough. Instead I always want to seek to make a positive change.

26. Observant

I want to take all of life in.

27. Peart

I want to be honestly in good spirits at all times.

28. Romantic

Sure, I want to be a little old school in this sense.

29. Elysian

I want to give you the same feeling that you get in paradise.

30. Curious

And I never want to stop searching for answers.
Cover Image Credit: Favim

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We All Need An 'In Color' Conversation, While We Still Can

The best way to keep memories is to pass them down.

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I love country music, especially a little older country music that tells a true story. One of my favorite songs from any genre is "In Color" by Jamey Johnson. It's one of the most relatable songs for anyone from any background. As you listen to it you feel the descriptions and the emotions Johnson is trying to get across.

Jamey Johnson - In Color YouTube

The song starts out with a grandkid asking about a picture and if it's his granddad. A simple question that can start a vast conversation and pass down memories of old times. This specific picture causes the grandfather to start speaking on the tough times in the 1930s and life on a cotton farm. For me, I can feel the same way that Johnson felt hearing the memories his grandfather passed down to him because my grandfather has told me the same memories about growing up in the south in the 1930s on a large piece of farmland.

The second verse goes into the grandfather showing a picture of him and his tail gunner Johnny McGee. He gives the information that McGee is a teacher from New Orleans and he had his back throughout the war. Though my granddad has never gone into anything that happened overseas in Korea, he will tell you stories for days about Camp Roberts in California. There's even a large picture of Camp Roberts hanging in his house. It's understandable he won't talk about what happened overseas because some Veterans will just tuck it away and it's how they handle it; however, hearing the tales about his basic training, his time on a boat headed overseas, and seeing pictures in his uniform still mean a lot to me.

My favorite story he talks about is how he was used to running the fields on a farm just outside Phenix City and was used to running in the heat, but the guys from up north(especially Chicago and New York) would drop like flies from the dry California heat.

The third and final verse describes a picture from their wedding. According to the granddad, it was a hot June that year before telling how red the rose was and how blue her eyes were. For most anyone, you will hear about your grandparents' wedding day and possibly see some pictures. My granddad to this day still talks about how blonde my grandmother was back then. It just helps bring my emotions more into the song.

The one thing Johnson does say in the song that most people feel when hearing these stories or looking at black and white pictures is "A pictures worth a thousand words, but you can't see what those shades of gray keep covered, you should have seen it in color." There's a lot of stories I've heard from either my parents or grandparents and wished I could have been there.

The music video for the song is so simple as well yet one of the best music videos I have ever seen. It starts in Black and white with Jamey Johnson sitting on a stool playing an acoustic guitar surrounded by hundreds of black and white pictures. It just brings the entire vibe of the song together. After the second chorus, the video starts to change from black and white to colorized and you see the pictures in their true colors.

The first time I had a true "In Color" conversation my step-granddad on my mom's side who was the only granddad I had known for that side of the family was declining in health. I was 9 or 10 and an in-home nurse had been talking to him about all his life experiences and told me to go in and talk to my Paw Paw about them. I learned about his father died when he was 14 by getting kicked by a mule and about his many years of service in the National Guard. At that time I never realized how major that was but as I look back those are the moments I cherish and I will pass down those memories as well as the numerous times he'd run your feet over with his electric scooter.

In eighth grade, I did a project on my dad's father and pulled out a box of old black and white pictures. These pictures ranged from him as a boy, his great grandfather, his first car, him in his service uniform, on up to him in suits on his business trips for the Columbus mills. I was older then and around the time I cherished learning more about his life and wish I knew where that box was just to have a look again.

A couple years ago around my 21st birthday, I had an "In Color" conversation with my mother about my dad looking through pictures while drinking Boone's Farm Strawberry Hill wine. It had almost been two years since my father's death and though I'd had plenty of conversations about his high school days on the football field playing for ol' Dickie Brown to stealing Mr. Gays Batmobile to getting three licks pretty often. I'd even heard these stories from different friends of his from high school and hearing different sides makes you feel more and more like you were there. As we sat there looking at pictures my mom told my wife Sarina who hadn't heard many of the stories and I knew and old stories about her life and my dad's life till 4 in the morning.

In conclusion, pictures can be passed down from generation to generation but unless you go through and talk about them then you won't pass down the story happening in the pictures. It is especially important just to sit down with a grandparent, a parent, an aunt or uncle, or an elder from your church or community to learn wisdom and about their life. I've had times I'll see an older couple or just an elder sitting alone at a restaurant and will pay for their meal(even if you can tell they have the money it's just a respect thing) or just talk to them. It can usually make their day and make them happy to share about their life with you if they don't have anyone else to. So let's keep the memories alive!

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