Vacation: RV Camper or Hotel Room?

Vacation: RV Camper or Hotel Room?

The pros and cons of RV camping and staying in a hotel room
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It is finally summer time, and vacation normally comes with the season. A place to stay is a vital decision in having a wonderful vacation. The two most known ways of vacationing are RV camping and getting a hotel room. There are pros and cons to both. Hopefully, this list of the most common pros and cons will help you make an efficient decision on what method is best for you this summer vacation.

Prices differ, depending on location. However, the ratio difference is about the same difference for each location. In Pigeon Forge TN, the price as of now for a campsite at River Plantation Campground ranges from $35.00 to $38.00 a night for the cheapest site for summer. The Inn at Christmas Place has a price of around 139.00 per night for the cheapest room as of right now for the summer. Based on this research, RV camping is relatively cheaper than a hotel when it comes to the cost of staying per night. The difference between $35.00 and $139.00 is a long stretch, which is an important aspect when considering whether or not to stay at a hotel or a campsite. This price is a pro for camping, and a con for hotel rooms.

Even though the price per night is cheaper for a campsite instead of a hotel room, there is another factor to be considered. In order to RV camp, you must have an RV. If you do not have one already, that is an additional cost. A camper can be costly, depending on what accommodations you are looking for in a camper. Also, a camper requires a yearly tax and most would want insurance which also requires additional money. A hotel room does not require insurance, and you don’t have to worry about traveling with an RV to your location and back home. These aspects are a pro for hotel rooms, and a con for camping.

In a hotel room, nothing is your own (besides your clothing and luggage). In a camper, everything belongs to you. For example, you can bring your own lawn chairs and sit out in the sun or shade. Also, the campsite is perfect for children and adults alike to go bike riding or walking without the danger of traffic that is most common with hotels. RVs come with a kitchen, so you can cook a meal rather than going out to eat; a common pro that comes with RVs and a limitation on hotel rooms since most do not come with kitchens. With the outside area of your campsite, you can easily cook out steaks, hamburgers, hot dogs, etc. This is not possible in a hotel room. In a way, camping can be more private or homely than a hotel room.

A hotel room does not include having to unpack and pack up like an RV. For example, there is a lot of additional packing that comes with RVs such as food. In hotel rooms, you normally go out and don’t bother with packing so much food. RVs also require hooking up your sewage system, TV, water, electric, etc. In a hotel, accommodations are already met for you. Most RVs come with a patio; when it rains, the patio has to be positioned a certain way so that it does not collapse. This would not be a problem with a hotel room because you would not have one. RVs can be hard to haul if you are not experienced in hauling something bulky, such as a trailer.

The last pro and con I will list is the ability to have a campfire. An average hotel room does not give you a place for a nice campfire, which means s’mores is out of the question. This con to a hotel room is a good pro for RV camping, if s’mores and campfire are your thing.

I have listed the best known pros and cons of both hotel rooms and RV camping. This article should help you on your quest of planning a perfect vacation this summer. This article was not made to praise one and down the other. Hotel rooms and RV campers are both good ways of vacationing, and there are pros and cons to both. However, these specific pros and cons are important in planning a method that is in your best interest. This list is made only to help you decide whether or not you would like to camp or stay in a hotel room this summer based on your own preferences of vacationing.

Cover Image Credit: newtoncountyschools.org

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30 Places Every Millennial Girl Needs To Travel To BEFORE She Turns 30

Live your best life, all around the world.
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I am a travel enthusiast. There is nowhere I do not want to go.

Traveling the world is one of my biggest goals in life and I am determined to make it happen. The world is so big and I would love to see every inch of it at some point or another.

However, if I can travel to these 30 places before I turn 30, I will feel as though I have accomplished more than enough.

1. New York City, New York

2. New Orleans, Louisiana

3. Grand Canyon, Arizona

4. Las Vegas, Nevada

5. San Francisco, California

6. Los Angeles, California

7. Nashville, Tennessee

8. Honolulu, Hawaii

9. Walt Disney World, Florida

10. Chicago, Illinois

11. Nassau, Bahamas

12. Cozumel, Mexico

13. Cancún, Mexico

14. Bridgetown, Barbados

15. Basseterre, St. Kitts

16. Philipsburg, St. Maarten

17. Montego Bay, Jamacia

18. Christiansted, St. Croix

19. Punta Cana, Dominican Republic

20. Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas

21. Tortola Baths, Tortola

22. San Juan, Puerto Rico

23. Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos

24. Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

25. Oranjestad, Aruba

26. Mykonos, Greece

27. London, England

28. Paris, France

29. Barcelona, Spain

30. Rome, Italy

Okay, so these are 30 places I want to go out of like, a million. I have traveled to some of these places and would not hesitate one second to go back.

Every new place is like a new adventure, and traveling will forever be so exciting and intruiging to me.

Cover Image Credit: Maisa Teat

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You Asked, I Answered: Study Abroad Edition

Tips, tricks and truths about studying abroad.
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I still constantly get asked about my study abroad experience, and if you know me you know those are my favorite questions. I will go on for days about my semester abroad because it truly was the best time of my life (thus far).

That's why I've compiled a list of some commonly asked questions I receive about my experience and some questions I know I had before I went abroad.

Keep reading for some tips, tricks and truths about studying abroad:

Q: Where did you go?

A: The beautiful Florence, Italy.

Q: When did you go?

A: I studied abroad Fall of 2018, as a Sophomore in college.

Q: Did you always know you wanted to study abroad?

A: I've always loved travelling and seeing new places, but I've never really gone on any real adventure where I travelled on my own, only family vacations. I did want to study abroad when I was High School but never actually planned for it to happen.

I honestly didn't think my parents would ever say yes.

Q: Was this the first time you've left the country?

A: No, I've been to Mexico and Costa Rica so I already had a passport.

Q: Did all of your credits transfer?

A: This one kills me because this is what makes so many people not want to study abroad, and for good reason. It's been an entire semester since I studied abroad and my credits have still not successfully made it onto my transcript.

But wait, as you read this they are being articulated and reprocessed and should show up in about a week (fingers crossed). Basically, I went through all the necessary steps (and they were extensive) to ensure my credit would transfer. All of the courses I planned to take had to be approved by advisors, and heads of different programs. So you can imagine my shock when I returned home to find that my University (in America) does not accept the specific University I attended in Florence.

How does that happen after all of the approvals I had received before I left...I don't know but it did and you can I threw fits in every office on campus until someone decided to help me.

That took a while, but things are looking up now!

Q: Did everyone speak English?

A: Yes.

Everyone I met spoke at least enough English for me to understand what they were saying.

Q: Can you speak Italian now?

A: No.

I've never been the best with foreign language so I did not pick it up as well as my friends, but I knew enough to get around, order meals, pay for things, and read street signs.

I definitely knew more when I was there because I was hearing in constantly whenever I left my apartment, but it is not something that stuck with me, unfortunately.

Q: How many classes did you take?

A: 5 class, 15 credits, so a full schedule like I take at my home University.

Q: Were the classes hard?

A: I thought the classes were much, much easier than the classes I take at home!

Q: What classes did you take?

A: Intro to Communications

Public Speaking

Media in the Digital Age

Wines and Culture

Beginners Italian

...maybe that's why I thought the classes were easier.

Q: Did you travel every weekend?

A: Not every weekend, but a lot of weekends!

Many places I went to in Italy were just day trips because the trains are so fast you could go to Rome and back in the same day!

Q: Where did you go?

A: Florence, Italy (obviously)

Rome, Italy

Pisa, Italy

Cinque Terre, Italy

Pompeii, Italy

Capri, Italy

Sorrento, Italy

Viareggio, Italy

Venice, Italy

Vatican City (It's actually its own country)

Berlin, Germany

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Brussels, Belgium

Paris, France

Barcelona, Spain

Monte Carlo, Monaco

Budapest, Hungary

Vienna, Austria

Salzberg, Austria

18 Cities, 10 Countries

Q: How much did you pack?

A: I had 2 suitcases, a backpack, and a duffle bag. Most people only had 1 suitcase and a large carry-on, but if you know me you know I do not, under any circumstances, ever, pack light.

So, of course, I won't be packing light when I'll be away for four months!

Pro Tip: those vacuum seal space savers bags are the way to go! Just make sure you can find a vacuum before you leave your destination, believe it or not, that was the real struggle.

Q: Could you use your phone/did you have service?

A: I got a very small phone plan with my service provider that was meant for studying abroad.

Most people bought chips to put in their phone once they were over there that allowed them to have service or bought small phones that look like the old phones your parent had mid-two thousands and they would be for emergencies.

I only ever had wifi when I was inside and I learned the hard way the third day I was there that data rates are much more expensive abroad.

Pro Tip: Make sure your cellular data is off ALWAYS, and only use iMessage when you're sure you're on wifi, if not use WhatsApp, it won't charge you!

Those are just a few answers to some of the basic questions I get asked on the reg. If you have any questions that you still want answered about studying abroad feel free to reach out to me, it's my favorite thing to talk about!

If you're able to study abroad there's no question that you should do it!

It's the most life changing experience, and I promise you won't regret it.

Cover Image Credit: Emily Beltran

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