Transitioning From YA To Adult Fiction

Transitioning From YA To Adult Fiction

Another facet to growing up.
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There are many struggles as one grows up. For those who enjoy reading, this also extends to the different varieties of books. Much like the transition from children’s to young adult books, another shift occurs as these teens move from the world of adult fiction to reading regular adult fiction. Finding exactly which books to read can lead to a stressful trip to the library, as more time is spent trying to pick out books for an extended period of time.

As in the earlier move between stages, this later shift also happens during the liminal time between the end of the teen years and the start of adult life. A stage of leaving familiar books and authors behind in search of new ones and the discovery of different magical worlds hidden within the spines of books on library shelves.

I’m currently in this shifting phase from YA to adult books. While I know I have the freedom to keep reading teen novels as long as I want, this past year I’ve been branching out to adult fiction which I approach with mixed feelings. I’m happy to be moving on, yet sad to leave this familiar world behind. It’s like I’m caught between two completely different places, not quite fully belonging in either. This is a stage that comes with researching authors who write in certain genres and books that may fit within my interests.

To help bridge the gap and get myself acquainted with the authors of adult fiction, I found a genre I liked: mystery. Then I discovered Agatha Christie through being assigned to read one of her novels in high school and began reading her novels that feature the character Hercule Poirot, a Belgian detective who pays very special attention to the care of his mustache. I found I really liked her style of writing and the way she shaped her novels, so I continued to find and read all her books that I could get my hands on through my local library.

I still continued to read teen novels but have recently found I was having trouble reading them from the same viewpoint that I had been for quite a while. I began noticing I disagreed with the decisions of or found myself not too fond of the main characters in these teen books. Where I would have cheered them on a few years ago, now my faces scrunches as I catch myself thinking “why are they doing that? They should have done this other thing instead.”



But don’t get me wrong, I still enjoy young adult books, but I have become choosier about the ones I do end up reading. Perhaps this is a sign that I’m growing up, but I do find myself more drawn to some of the adult books, especially ones where the main characters are young adults around my age or not much older. Books always have been an important part of my life, and figuring out whether I read a teen novel or one for adults is just another part of what it means to be a reader.

Cover Image Credit: http://studentstories.hillsdale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/stack-of-books.png

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​An Open Letter To The People Who Don’t Tip Their Servers

This one's for you.
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Dear Person Who Has No Idea How Much The 0 In The “Tip:" Line Matters,

I want to by asking you a simple question: Why?

Is it because you can't afford it? Is it because you are blind to the fact that the tip you leave is how the waiter/waitress serving you is making their living? Is it because you're just lazy and you “don't feel like it"?

Is it because you think that, while taking care of not only your table but at least three to five others, they took too long bringing you that side of ranch dressing? Or is it just because you're unaware that as a server these people make $2.85 an hour plus TIPS?

The average waiter/waitress is only supposed to be paid $2.13 an hour plus tips according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

That then leaves the waiter/waitress with a paycheck with the numbers **$0.00** and the words “Not a real paycheck." stamped on it. Therefore these men and women completely rely on the tips they make during the week to pay their bills.

So, with that being said, I have a few words for those of you who are ignorant enough to leave without leaving a few dollars in the “tip:" line.

Imagine if you go to work, the night starts off slow, then almost like a bomb went off the entire workplace is chaotic and you can't seem to find a minute to stop and breathe, let alone think about what to do next.

Imagine that you are helping a total of six different groups of people at one time, with each group containing two to 10 people.

Imagine that you are working your ass off to make sure that these customers have the best experience possible. Then you cash them out, you hand them a pen and a receipt, say “Thank you so much! It was a pleasure serving you, have a great day!"

Imagine you walk away to attempt to start one of the 17 other things you need to complete, watch as the group you just thanked leaves, and maybe even wave goodbye.

Imagine you are cleaning up the mess that they have so kindly left behind, you look down at the receipt and realize there's a sad face on the tip line of a $24.83 bill.

Imagine how devastated you feel knowing that you helped these people as much as you could just to have them throw water on the fire you need to complete the night.

Now, realize that whenever you decide not to tip your waitress, this is nine out of 10 times what they go through. I cannot stress enough how important it is for people to realize that this is someone's profession — whether they are a college student, a single mother working their second job of the day, a new dad who needs to pay off the loan he needed to take out to get a safer car for his child, your friend, your mom, your dad, your sister, your brother, you.

If you cannot afford to tip, do not come out to eat. If you cannot afford the three alcoholic drinks you gulped down, plus your food and a tip do not come out to eat.

If you cannot afford the $10 wings that become half-off on Tuesdays plus that water you asked for, do not come out to eat.

If you cannot see that the person in front of you is working their best to accommodate you, while trying to do the same for the other five tables around you, do not come out to eat. If you cannot realize that the man or woman in front of you is a real person, with their own personal lives and problems and that maybe these problems have led them to be the reason they are standing in front of you, then do not come out to eat.

As a server myself, it kills me to see the people around me being deprived of the money that they were supposed to earn. It kills me to see the three dollars you left on a $40 bill. It kills me that you cannot stand to put yourself in our shoes — as if you're better than us. I wonder if you realize that you single-handedly ruined part of our nights.

I wonder if maybe one day you will be in our shoes, and I hope to God no one treats you how you have treated us. But if they do, then maybe you'll realize how we felt when you left no tip after we gave you our time.

Cover Image Credit: Hailea Shallock

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Contrary To Popular Belief, Ben Shapiro Is Not Condescending

I made a fool of myself while meeting the world's most controversial political commentator. At least he's used to it.

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Grand Canyon University security guards held back a sea of people as I walked through the gates and into the antelope gym. The "Shapiro ban" that had sparked outrage a few months before had just been lifted, and campus YAF (Young Americas Foundation) members were finally allowed to host the Daily Wire editor in chief. The only reason I was allowed access to this monumental event was because I'd pledged to help with the YAF club set-up about a week earlier. I was desperate to meet (and write about) Ben Shapiro. I received a name tag and was ushered into a room in the back of the antelope gym. I chatted nervously with another member of the YAF club as we waited for Shapiro to arrive.

Morganne Scheuerman

Finally, the 5'7" Kippah-sporting legend sauntered into the room. A smile was painted across his face as all of us (aspiring politicians and journalists) gawked at one of the most controversial figures to cross the political stage. Hating awkward silences, I "broke protocol" by walking up and introducing myself. We were supposed to fall into a photo line and keep comments/conversations to a minimum. I was quickly forced into line after shaking Ben's hand and briefly stating my name.

Morganne Scheuerman

Ben was more than cordial, smiling a lot and kindly agreeing with or laughing at all of the comments from people as he took a photo with them. When my turn came, I told myself I would say,

"I want to be a conservative journalist, so I messaged you one of my articles on Facebook once."

Instead, after I posed for a picture and looked him straight in the eyes, what came out was,

"I messaged you on Facebook once."

I messaged you on Facebook once? I started to panic, knowing that the YAF leaders were in a huge hurry and I needed to get into the antelope gym so that I could start ushering students to their seats. So, instead of trying to elaborate, I stood there like an idiot with my mouth open and then walked away. I grabbed my phone from the girl who took my Shapiro picture and covered my face with my hands.

Despite all of this, I tried to laugh off the situation and made the mistake of telling one of the YAF members about my blunder. He quickly added my quote to the YAF group chat on Facebook. I became an instant meme. Honestly, none of this really got to me since I was just happy to be in the same room as someone who could stump even the most intelligent political leaders. I forgot all about my embarrassing moment as I helped the leaders usher students to the right seats. Finally, the event started, and I took my seat to the right of the stage. After listening to his brilliant speech on "why we need both faith and reason," I felt prompted to ask him a question during the Q&A; time at the end of the event.

Morganne Scheuerman

I fell into (yet another) line with what I suspected was about 35 guys and one other girl student. Standing in front of thousands of people was not my favorite thing to do, so I shifted my weight nervously and found it extremely difficult to focus on or remember any of the other questions that were asked. There were about 10 people still in front of me when I noticed all of the whisperings from the chief organizer of the event. They were about to cut off people off and end the event. I prayed silently, thinking, "God, if you want me to ask this question, you already made me get up here, so you have to make it happen. I'm not going to ask to move to the front of the line. It's up to you." I already knew which question I wanted to ask, and I knew that God was the one who'd put it in my mind, but I was terrified. My boss came up behind me and whispered, "Do you want to ask your question."

I hesitated, but reluctantly nodded, "Yeah. I do."

Just like that, I was moved to the front of the question-line. I introduced myself to another usher as I waited nervously. I tried not to rehearse what I was about to say since that strategy hadn't worked for me the first time.

Morganne Scheuerman

"Uhm, politically, I agree with you on everything. But, religiously, I'm a Christian. So, I was just wondering why you don't think Jesus is the Messiah?"

He smiled and paused,

"So...so, right."

The whole crowd started making noise, saying in unison, "oooooh," as Ben Shapiro laughed. He quickly recovered, saying,

"The reason I usually don't have these theological discussions is mainly that, in the words of a famous person, 'I find it divisive.'"

He then went on to explain that the Jewish people are expecting a political figure, instead of God "in the flesh." Although I normally love listening to these kinds of discussions, all I could focus on was the fact that my heart felt like it was going to beat out of my chest from resisting the urge to run from the sea of gawking people.

After the event was over, Ben's bodyguard slipped him out of the gym almost noticeably as the rest of the YAF club cleaned up and took some last-minute pictures. I couldn't stop shaking from the adrenaline rush of speaking in front of Ben Shapiro and a lot of people I either knew really well or had never seen before.

Relief washed over me. Thank God my second conversation with Ben Shapiro was so much better than the first. They were both equally entertaining though.

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