13 Tips To Help Motivate You In College

13 Tips To Help Motivate You In College

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Your college years can be fun and exciting, but when it is time to work on and complete schoolwork, most students do not really jump at the opportunity. Doing homework can be boring after a while, and most students tend to get on their phones and use social media or watch Netflix instead. While tempting, it is not the best idea when you need to finish something. Here are some tips to get you motivated to do your homework and study for those big tests.

1. Listen to music while you work.


Listening to music is a great way to get you focused and help you complete tasks. Everyone listens to different genres of music when they have to study or do homework, and some prefer to just sit in a work space with no music playing. When you can't find good music to listen to while you work, or if you want to listen to something different, try looking at study/focus playlists on music platforms such as Spotify, AppleMusic and Pandora Internet Radio.

2. Establish a homework schedule.


Even if you are not a super-organized person, planning out what you are going to work on at what time actually helps you get your homework done. It also helps you keep track of when each assignment is due and prevents you from forgetting about an assignment or remembering it at the very last minute. You can write your schedule out in a planner, on post-it notes, a whiteboard, your phone's calendar or a scheduling app. It is super easy and extremely helpful!

3. Set goals.

Tell yourself you are going to complete a certain number of assignments or make flashcards in a specific amount of time. You could even make a checklist of the goals you want to accomplish to make it even more satisfactory when you finish each goal.

4. Establish rewards.


Another way to get motivated to finish tasks is to find and create a reward system that will make you want to do schoolwork. Tell yourself that if you read two chapters, you are allowed to spend the following 20 minutes on social media or watching TV. A tasty tactic could be putting your favorite candy across your textbook pages and telling yourself that when you read past each candy, you can eat it. There are countless reward systems you can use when doing homework, you just have to find the most effective one that will cause you to want to do your schoolwork.

5. Get support from friends or family.

Sometimes the best motivator is getting positive support from loved ones. Call or text them and tell them how you want to get motivated to work on your schoolwork, but need a pep talk or positive feedback from them. I am sure they would be more than happy to do so if it will actually get you driven to do your work.

6. Form a study group.


Do you ever get confused by something your professor said in class or on a topic that will be on an upcoming test, and do not want to ask your professor about it? See if anyone in the class would like to get a study group going; sometimes having classmates around you studying will encourage you to stay focused as well.

7. Do not procrastinate.

Kind of self-explanatory. Just try to avoid it at all costs.

8. If you end up thinking about ways to procrastinate, think about why you are attending college.

You are on the verge of procrastinating -- you just do not feel like working on your assignments. It happens, I get it (and for some it happens way too often). When you are at this stage, try and think about why you are at college. Why is it important for you to go to and graduate from college? Thinking about that kind of stuff will get you motivated to complete your tasks because you are in college for a reason, and that reason is probably fairly unique. But remember that you're not at college to just have fun.

9. Put inspirational quotes or notes up around the area where you do homework.


Having constant motivational quotes visible around the areas you walk by every day will help put a smile on your face, as well as get you in the mood to do well in your classes.

10. Learn to say no to distractions that will disturb you from getting your work done.

Let's say your roommates want to go get food or go shopping and ask you to come along while you are sitting down to work on an assignment. While it may seem very tempting to just leave your work behind, sometimes the shopping can wait until you get your work done.

11. Put your cell phone away.

Put away anything you are prone to use that distracts you from your responsibilities. Putting your cell phone (or something of that sort) in another room or far away from you will force you to get your work done.

12. Stay positive.

I know there are several times throughout the semester where we all get really stressed and think about dropping out (midterms and finals week), but please try to have a good attitude when it comes to school. Instead of saying you want to drop out, tell yourself you are going to try your hardest to study and prepare for your tests and do the best you can.

13. Take care of yourself.

The most important thing that you need to make your top priority is you. Make sure you are getting enough sleep, eating throughout the day and simply living a happy, healthy life. If you can't remember the last time you got any sleep or ate, you need to make sure that is done or you won't feel like yourself.

Cover Image Credit: IvyWise

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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Just Because You Chose A Specific Major Doesn't Mean You Can't Explore Other Passions

Those same passions that you found at whatever point in your life, are not static. They are, for a fact, going to change. And that is completely OK.

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As children, we all grew up with a favorite hobby or activity and kept up with them as we got older. Whatever these hobbies and activities were turned into the things we turned to when we needed a break from all the drama of school and work. These were the things that turned into passions that we live to do and talk about. These are the passions that we wish we could turn into futures.

Well, I'm going to assume that quite a few of us feel that way.

Thought, not everyone is lucky enough to find their passions during their childhood. For others, such passion takes a little longer to develop. But the time that this occurs is not as relevant as the fact that you find something you absolutely adore doing. It is more important that you find something that you love and enjoy, something that motivates you, raises your spirits, and encourages you to learn more.

So, you should go out there and explore everything the world has to offer! There are thousands of things, each more different than the last, that you could be interested in. The things that make your heart race, increase your need for knowledge, or simply make you overjoyed should be things that you pursue. These are activities and hobbies that influence your life from the minute you find them.

Not all passions are created equal.

A majority of the passions we find ourselves in are artistic and creative in nature and not truly suitable for a future job. When brought up to our parents, they are turned down, usually with the phrase "But, can you get a job with that major?" or "How successful are you going to be in a field like that?" Our passions end up being something that we look forward to doing, not forever, but for the time being. However, the opinions of others (even if they are your parents) should never get in the way of you chasing your dreams. If your passion is truly the field and career you would like to pursue, then I say go for it!

My parents said, "While I encourage you to look into computer science, it's not something we're going to push you to do. You can major in whatever, as long as you enjoy doing it and can provide for yourself."

That is the advice that my parents gave me as I entered my junior year of high school, the year most significant to the college application process other than the actual application itself. Before all of that and my entrance into Rutgers, I was just a student within my high school's animal and botanical sciences program looking to study environmental science. But, after much thinking about how I generally do not like bugs and dirt, I listened to my parents' advice and started looking into computer science.

By my senior year and the time when applications roll around, I had decided that computer science was something I was truly interested in! I found coding and everything that came with it to be fascinating to learn, and I looked forward to every AP Computer Science class I got to attend. Looking at the jobs and career fields related to these studies only encouraged me more. At the end of the year, I had already decided that I would like to work an exciting government job in cybersecurity (impressive, I know).

Now fast forward to now, I'm a full-time student at Rutgers and I am no longer interested in computer science. Although, to be fair, I am less interested in the mathematical aspects and courses that come along with everything else. I am currently looking to major in Information Technology and Informatics, with minors in Critical Intelligence Studies and Linguistics. It was a small change, but simultaneously a significant one. While my goal is relatively similar to what it was before, not everything is the same.

The passions and skills that I have developed in my short time at Rutgers have changed some things. I am no longer as interested in coding as I used to be, but rather the analytical aspects of cybersecurity; I would rather be active in my job, constantly interacting with people as opposed to just sitting at a desk as my 9-5.

Those same passions that you found at whatever point in your life, are not static.

They are, for a fact, going to change. And that is completely OK. College is the time for you to discover what makes you tick, the things that push you to be at your very best at all times rather than a fraction of that.

Here at Rutgers, you have the opportunity to explore hundreds of majors and minors, making the combinations and possibilities endless. You have the ability to customize your courses and activities to pursue a specific path, as well. Everything that you do from the moment you step on campus will impact your future. It is simply up to you to figure out what it is exactly you want to do.

Even then, while your passions may not be your future, that does not mean you have to completely disregard them.

You still have the ability to keep them within your life through extracurriculars and free time. Never, at any point in your life, should you being willing to settle for anything less than something you are passionate about even as they change over time.

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