Start your new year right:

1. Almost all Resolutions are Imperfect. 

A perfect duty is something which we are expected to be in charge of twenty-four-seven. An imperfect duty is one which allows for more ambiguity in regards to when we fulfill it. Almost all resolutions are imperfect duties. It would be impossible to require oneself to uphold these new goals for ourselves if they were required of us constantly. If your resolution was to be more optimistic, obviously you aren't required to be happy-go-lucky every second of every day for the entire year. A lot of people expect too much from themselves when making their resolutions. But in order for anything to last, or to stick properly, we must allow ourselves more breathing space. Inclement and severe changes are often difficult to adjust to, and because of this, they do not last.

2. Stick to One thing at a Time.

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Often people pick several things which they would like to change in their lives and attempt to take all of them on at once. This usually inhibits their ability to actually make any change. Instead, if a person focuses on one specific resolution of theirs at a time, they will be more likely to reach change. A person who makes too many changes at once simply will not be able to juggle it all, and then none of those goals will be met. Picking one thing and prioritizing that will allow for actual change.

3. Tell Your Family and Friends.

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By sharing your resolutions with those close to you, you are building a support system for yourself. It's important to tell the people who are an important part of your life what kind of changes you're planning on making for yourself. Without their support and understanding, you may lose the motivation to get through those changes. Having people to share your struggles and successes with makes those goals easier to achieve, much less daunting, and more fulfilling.

4. Be Specific In Your Goal-Making.

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It's easy to just say "I want to get more exercise," or "I want to get better grades," but how do you actually measure those things? It's much more effectual to create specific goals for yourself. For instance, instead of saying that you will exercise more, you should say, "I will go to the gym three days a week." This way, you can actually track your progress, and keep tabs on your successes and setbacks. Creating detailed resolutions helps you to actually achieve the change you've been seeking.

5. Reward Your Successes.

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After accomplishing a small part of your goal early on, pick a reward to give yourself. This will help to keep you motivated and driven. Make sure the reward is unrelated to your resolution - This way it doesn't interfere with your progress. It's good to chunk up your successes and create breaks for yourself (as previously mentioned). And if you set rewards for yourself at the end of each achievement, then you have incentive to keep going. As you move along and make progress, reward yourself before stepping it up. This will keep you constantly looking forward, and help you stick to your resolutions long-term.