The Thank You's My Parents Deserve

These Are The 15 Thank You's That My Parents Deserve

"You've let me follow my dreams, and I'm so thankful for that."

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My parents are Joyce and David Pence. My dad went to Trion High School (where I graduated from), and my mom went to Chattooga High School. They both graduated and married in 1997. My brother was born in March 1998, I was born in January 2000, and my sister was born in December 2001. We're each two years apart and usually fought tremendously, but our parents always tried their hardest to make sure we loved and cared for each other. I just want to say thank you.

Dear Mom and Dad,

1. Thank you for always putting your three children first.

2. Thank you for allowing me to follow my dreams.

3. Thank you for your endless love, even if we may not deserve it.

4. Thank you for the meals, birthday parties, and everything in between.

5. Thank you for laughing with me.

6. Thank you for crying with me.

7. Thank you for knocking some sense into me when I'm acting crazy.

8. Thank you for showing me that I should love myself.

9. Thank you for teaching me how to love other people.

10. Thank you for telling me when you're proud.

11. Thank you for always giving me the "I told you so" stare when I did something you told me not to.

12. Thank you for never letting me go out in public dressed terribly

13. Thank you for always laughing at me when I over dramatically hurt myself.

14. Thank you for telling me what I'm capable of.

15. Thank you for always being there for me in the good and bad times.

Thank you for giving me the life every child deserves, and thank you for being great parents. I love you both so much.

Love, Your Daughter

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Raising A Black Man In America

Let them know the importance of black people and black men.

JBoyd
JBoyd
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America has much to offer to people. It is the home of the brave and the land of the free. How amazing it seems to live in America unless you are an African-American male. This article is focused on black men and their presence in America. Being a black man in America is hard, but raising a black man is even harder.

I am not a mother, but I am an aunt of a one-year-old black male. I facetime him every day and I enjoy his smile, cry and laugh. That little boy brightens my world.

One day I began to think about his future and who he would be as a man. I felt pain in my stomach as I thought about everything that he would have to endure as a black man in America. Let's focus in on what he will have to endure.

1. Police Interaction

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When raising a black man in today's society it is important to teach them how to act around police officers. You have to teach them to do as they are told by the officers so that nothing happens to them. When driving in the car and a police officer pulls them over, they must let the officer know that they aren't armed.

If they need to reach and grab their license or registration, they must inform the officer that they are about to do that. If the officer asks them to get out the car, they must do as their told and put their hands where the officer can see them. It's sad that it has come to this, but there have been too many black men that have been murdered or hurt due to police brutality.

2. Profiling

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When walking down the street, black men face many issues. I have been given examples from black men explaining how white women clinch their purses tighter when a black man walks past them on the sidewalk. All black men aren't horrible men. All black men aren't robbers or "gangsters". When raising a black man in today's society, explain that women may get nervous around them, but unfortunately that's a part of being black.

3. Jobs

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Black men face one of the most degrading issues in America when job searching. The black man may have many qualities and talents for a specific job, but the white man may get the job over the black man due to privilege, white privilege. A black man can work at a job for 12 years and his white co-worker may have worked there for 8 years and get the promotion the black man deserved.

This is America and this is how our society is. It is degrading that you have to raise a black man to know that he will have to work 10 times harder than the white man to get to where he wants to be or deserves to be. This is what it is like to be black in America. Facing discrimination hurts, but it hurts more when you are discriminated against because of your skin color, something that you genetically could not control.

When raising a black man in America, be smart and be honest with them. Let them know the importance of black people and black men. Reassure them that they are important in this world and that they are loved, this is what they will need to hear

JBoyd
JBoyd

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This Semester Has Been Rough, But It Is SO Worth It

The photo you see above is a direct representation of how things are going currently.

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Let's be honest, college is not for everyone, and there are some days I question if it is right for me. I don't want to be negative, but I do believe in being a realist (you can think my mom for that).

When I started college, it felt easier. I was living with my parents, going to school during the day, and working at a school in my hometown in the evenings. Life was easy, but I was foolish not to realize it.

It is now three years since I graduated high school, I have changed jobs (twice), and moved out, but now preparing to move back into my parents' home. I mean life is wild.

There are honestly days that I have forgotten to eat until like 10 at night, and let's not even discuss laundry. I do not know how actual adults do it.

Ya girl is not only on the struggle bus, but I AM DRIVING THAT BAD BOY RIGHT NOW.

It is the week before finals, and I am praying that I see Friday at this point. Do not judge a college student over the next two weeks, because we have forgotten about thriving, and we are simply trying to survive.

FYI: PARENTS, BE PREPARED FOR LOTS OF LAUNDRY AND KIDS WANTING HOME-COOKED MEALS OVER THE NEXT FEW DAYS.

I do not graduate until December with my bachelor's degree, and I tell you what, eight months feels like FOREVER. The closer I get to graduation, the slower time seems to go by.

But hey, YOU HAVE GOT THIS. WATCH THE TV SHOW. TAKE YOURSELF OUT FOR TACOS. TAKE A BATH. DO THAT LAUNDRY. YOU WILL SURVIVE, I may not, BUT YOU WILL.

In case anxiety and stress have taken over as it has for me, here are some tips for these last few days to help you get through it:

1. DO NOT FORGET TO EAT.

2. CALL YOUR FAMILY.

3. TAKE WALKS OUTSIDE TO GET FRESH AIR.

4. LEAVE THE LIBRARY (AT LEAST FOR JUST A FEW MINUTES).

5. REMEMBER WHY YOU ARE DOING THIS.

Gals (and guys) this degree will be so worth it.

I have grown up so much in the last three years, and it breaks my heart to know that I will be graduating at the end of this year. I have become this young woman that is full of joy in a world full of awfulness (is that even a real word??).

I have matured from a naive girl that grew up in a small town, and have learned that the tiniest things in life are the absolute greatest. College is a journey that is full of confetti, rainbows, late nights, coffee, tears, sweat, but of all moments that make me realize that I made the right decision.

I have truly learned that I am passionate about my degree and I will stop at nothing to walk across that stage, hear my full name (that is a bit long), and see my whole family smiling down on me.

We all know that we could not make it through these hard times without our families. So, don't take your frustration out on them, even when you are sleep deprived and just done with this whole thing we call college.

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