The Red, White And Blues Of America's Delayed Acceptance Of Independence Day

The Red, White And Blues Of America's Delayed Acceptance Of Independence Day

America's patriotic holiday was not always celebrated so patriotically.
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With fireworks burned out, parade festivities at a close, and barbecue now cold leftovers, the thought of the Fourth of July feels like last week's news. Despite our patriotic festivities coming to a close, I thought it best to shed light on how that explosive day started off with a far from celebratory welcome. For those who may protest this, let's remember that it's never a day too late to gain some necessary knowledge.

Also known as Independence Day, July 4th commemorates the official independence of the United States of America in 1776 after the Continental Congress agreed upon the independence of the U.S. and received the draft of the Declaration of Independence written by Thomas Jefferson, which was then completed with edits and changes on July 2nd. Not until July 4th was the final copy of the Declaration finalized and confirmed, ultimately becoming the date included on the document and that which delegates from the thirteen colonies came together to adopt the Declaration of Independence.

The celebration of July 4th itself however did not become an official holiday until 1941. Oddly enough, the Declaration was not greeted with as much patriotism and honor as we Americans view it now. Many years had passed since the finalization of the Declaration, yet its importance was regarded minimally as it went neglected as a celebratory event. Furthermore, controversy surrounded its origins as partisan disagreements lent itself to conflict between the Democratic Republicans who supported and admired Thomas Jefferson's Declaration and the Federalists who thought it opposed our British roots and was "too French," defying their policies.

Fortunately though, the 1800s would bring with it a new outlook on the significance of the Declaration. Following the War of 1812, the Federalists party began to fall apart and emerging parties of the 1820s and 1830s embraced the Democratic-Republican party as their own. Eventually with this new rise in the Democratic-Republican party, the Declaration, dated as July 4th, was printed in copies and was distributed throughout.

In 1870, nearly one-hundred years following the creation of the Declaration, did celebrations begin to take precedence for July 4th. Congress included the event and date within a bill to establish national holidays, this bill also included Christmas. Finally, legislation for national holidays were passed in 1939 and 1941, thus making the Fourth of July, Independence Day, an official holiday.

Surprisingly enough, tradition hasn't much changed to commemorate July 4th. Parades, fireworks, barbecues, and patriotic colors of red, white and blue still reign supreme as the staples of Independence Day. This, I'm certain, would make our founding fathers tip their hats in gratitude.

Cover Image Credit: pexels

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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7 Reasons Why Being An Education Major Is The Best Decision You Can Make In College

Everyone has pride in their major, but us education majors are ones to beat.

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Before and throughout college, I changed my major roughly five times. It was such a tough decision for me, but I finally landed on the perfect one for me and that was education. Here are the reasons why being an education major is hands down the best:

1. We get to help others 

A huge reason I stepped into this degree was because I knew I would get to make a difference - small or large.

2. We play a big part in how the future will look like 

Did you ever think about that? Teachers get to help shape the kids of the future by how the classroom is run.

3. Studying education makes you appreciate education 

I have always loved school, but not as much as I do now. I have found a strong passion for education and the value it holds.

4. We get to be role models 

Some of those kids who walk through the door won't have anyone at home rooting for them, or they will, but your encouragement and push will help drive them to succeed.

5. We get to create a fun and effective learning environment 

I have learned what I do and do not want my classroom environment to be just through the teachers that I have had.

6. No one can do my job without the teaching license 

This for me has created job security knowing that no one can take my job without also having gone through the education, student teaching, and testing that I have.

7. Teachers will ALWAYS be needed 

Education will never go away, so neither will we as teachers.

I am honored, to say the least, to be able to be a teacher one day. It is something that I cherish and will work my hardest at being one of the greats.

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