How Taylor Swift Empowered Women Across The World With $1

How Taylor Swift Empowered Women Across The World With $1

It's time to break the silence on sexual assault.
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Any person who has watched a television news broadcast, listened to the radio, or visited a news website online recently has most likely heard of the trial between Taylor Swift and popular Denver radio host David Mueller. The trial that has been plastered across every headline for days. For those of you unfamiliar, here are the listed facts.

Mueller was invited to a meet-and-greet with Swift during her tour in Denver. While Mueller and his girlfriend were taking a photo with Swift, she accused him of groping her butt. After Mueller and his girlfriend were removed from the concert, Mueller’s company was informed of the incident, and he was fired from his position two days later. In 2015, Mueller sued Swift for $3 million due to damages and lost money he would’ve made in the business.

Swift then countersued Mueller for a whopping $1 for assault and battery. Taylor Swift is an extremely popular music icon in today’s society, whose estimated net worth in 2017 according to Forbes was $280 million. Her goal of this trial was obviously not to gain any money. Instead, she took advantage of this situation as an opportunity to empower girls and women, and teach the public no means no. No woman, whether rich or poor, wildly popular or average, should be forced to suffer through a sexual assault.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, one in five women will be raped at some point in their lives. A vast majority of these people will not take legal action against their perpetrator for a variety of reasons - fear of judgement, fear of lack of evidence, fear of retaliation by the perpetrator, among other reasons.

This is exactly the reason Swift countersued. The jury favoring in support of her case was symbolic. The many women who will suffer through these acts now have a positive influence and a positive result to reference to empower them to stand up for themselves and report to the police if they happen to be involved in a sexual assault. Not only this, but Swift also told reporters she would donate to different organizations aimed in helping sexual assault survivors defend themselves.

For campuses across the country, leaders have been educating students on avoiding sexual assault encounters, and what to do if you fall victim. The University of Minnesota's Aurora Center is a free, confidential service to students who have suffered from sexual assault or relationship violence. They provide different resources, therapy, and help to students in need.

Despite all of these efforts, people are still afraid to come forward with their stories. It is time perpetrators are held accountable for their actions, as Mueller was in this case. Although, Swift only received an extremely small monetary reimbursement for her suffering, the message behind her countersuit was clear.

Break the Silence Day is officially August 16, 2017 in the state of Minnesota. It is a journey where survivors of sexual assault and sexual violence can speak their stories, and in turn, be met with validation, support, and solidarity. There is power in numbers, and this day was set in order to provide a safe environment and support, as victims often feel to lack.

It's time follow in the footsteps of Taylor Swift and break the silence on sexual assault.

Cover Image Credit: NPR

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Stop Yelling At Me For Being Conservative

What you shouldn't say to millennial Republicans.
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Society today has a funny way of making Republicans seem like the scum of the Earth. The funniest thing is that it's actually not funny at all — it's an ignorant, rude way to treat people. See, America these days seems to be all about treating everyone fairly. That is, until differing opinions come about. How dare we Republicans view economics and politics differently? How dare we have our own opinions? How dare we identify as Conservative people, even as young adults?

So, without further ado, here are some things that I, a millennial Republican, am beyond tired of hearing.


"You're just a college girl, what do you know about politics?"

Yeah, I'm a basic white girl. I wear Converse to class and my sorority's letters are on my rear windshield. Guess what, though — I do my research. I've been following the presidential campaigns for months now. I've watched the debates, read the articles, visited the websites and studied the polls. I may be in a sorority and I may wear Converse, but I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this stuff. So, if you ask for my opinion, be prepared to hear a well-thought-out, educated answer.

"You only believe what your parents raised you to believe."

No, actually. My parents raised me to understand the value of hard work. They made me get a job when I was 16 years old so I could learn how to budget, save and provide for myself. My parents did not teach me to rely on other people to get what I want. My parents did not teach me to accept handouts. Therefore, I believe that success comes from hard work and dedication. I believe that each individual is responsible for his or her own success (along with his or her own property and obligations), hence why I identify as a Conservative.

"You're voting for him?!"

Yeah! I am! Funny, I thought we were all entitled to our own opinion. It turns out this is my opinion, and [insert candidate] has my vote. Cool how that works, huh?

"The GOP candidates this time around are horrible."

It doesn't take an idiot to see that none of the Republican candidates are the ideal presidential candidate. It also doesn't take an idiot to see that the same thing can be said of the Democratic candidates. Here's the reality: There never has been a perfect president, there never has been a perfect presidential candidate, there is no perfect president, there is no perfect presidential candidate, there never will be a perfect president and there never will be a perfect presidential candidate.

"You're so selfish."

Define selfish. I want my money to be my money and I want my rights to be my rights; I was unaware that that labels me as "selfish." I am confident that I can survive without the government's help.

"But don't you care about the old people/the kids/the environment/the homeless people/etc?"

Yes, I do. What I don't like is that my hard-earned money gets taken from me and used for other things. I'm not against helping out, don't get me wrong. I would love to donate to charities to help children and homeless people and the planet, that is if I had enough money to do so. Sadly, that money gets taken from me through taxes (Which could be considered forced donation, if you ask me. How is that fair?).

"But what about the minorities? You're just racist."

No, I'm not racist and yes, I do care about the minorities. I believe diversity is one of America's greatest qualities. What bothers me, though, is that society changes the meaning of "fair" when it comes to minorities. Yeah, it would be fair for us to all be able to pay our own medical bills and whatnot. Do you know what else would be fair? For even the members of minorities to get jobs and earn their way to success just like I'm trying to do. If illegal immigrants want to come to America, then they can go through the citizenship process, get a job and contribute to society. If they want to be treated equally, they need to start viewing themselves and treating themselves as working American citizens who pay the same taxes, get the same jobs and fight the same daily battles that we fight.

"You're hateful and/or heartless."

Nah. What I am is honest, self-sufficient and confident that other people can be honest and self-sufficient.

"You're ignorant."

Again, no, I'm not. As I've said several other times throughout this article, I know what I'm talking about and I can justify what I'm talking about. If anything, you're ignorant for accusing me of such things.

"You're crazy if you'd vote Trump over Sanders or Clinton if he's the chosen GOP candidate."

Please enlighten me on how this makes me "crazy." In this upcoming election, I will be voting for the candidate chosen by my political affiliation. The Republican Party's only strong opposing candidates include a self-proclaimed Socialist and a woman under FBI investigation. What I would consider "crazy" is if I voted for Sanders or Clinton over Donald Trump, just because Trump has offended some people before. (And no, this is not me saying I'm a loud and proud Trump supporter. In fact, Cruz has my vote either until he's elected into office or until Trump is chosen as the GOP candidate.)

Side note: I've heard the people, who hate Trump for being mean, say meaner things than that man ever has. A very wise man (Jesus, in John 8:7) once said, "Let him who is without sin cast the first stone."


What you should be saying to me is "Thank you," because I'm voting for freedom. I'm voting for civil liberties. I'm voting for constitutional rights. I'm voting for the will to succeed. I'm voting for the reward for hard work. I'm voting for the things that will actually help America keep prospering.

So, here's what I'll say to you: You're welcome.

Cover Image Credit: Kristi Russell

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The Only National Emergency Is How Much Control We've Given The Federal Government

Can we build a wall around the swamp instead?

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Earlier this year, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency to secure funds for a portion of his border wall. Currently, lawsuits upon lawsuits are being filed against Trump and this declaration, citing the inappropriateness of bypassing Congress for a project like a border wall.

While many disagree on the term "border crisis," there is one thing we should be able to agree on: our government is the real crisis.

Instead of a representative government, we have enabled a government set out to control many aspects of our personal lives. You must have health insurance, car insurance, you can't decide your own healthcare, and soon you won't be able to serve our country if you're trans... the list goes on and on.

Our country was founded on the idea of a limited government with more power given to individual states. In the 243 years since our country was established this ideal has gone out the window. While some of this change has been useful (FDA regulations and EPA guidelines) much of it has surpassed the power of the states and the people.

We have become too complacent in allowing our government to run our lives.

If we want to see actual change, we need to recognize the hyper-control of the government as the real national threat, not exaggerated threats from the border or claims about those seeking a new life in our country.

The administration is seeking to divide our country to weaken it so that we won't question their imaginary crises and outdated policies. If we want change we must fight against this separation and start being informed at the polls and advocating for policies that reflect our country's values rather than the values of those in power.

We can't let ourselves be separated by the body meant to keep us together.

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