'13 Reasons Why' Is A Show That NEEDS To Be Talked About More

'13 Reasons Why' Is A Show That NEEDS To Be Talked About More

It brings light on issues that so many people avoid, which is exactly why it needs to be talked about.
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There aren’t a lot of shows out there that show the “ugly,” raw, real side of things like sexual assault, depression, suicide, drug use and violence.

This may be because these things are hard to talk about, so not talking about them is a solution, which isn’t ideal.

Both seasons of "13 Reasons Why" on Netflix cover these topics, and despite the backlash, it has gotten, I fully believe it is a show that needs to be seen and talked about more often.

Because of season one, there are trigger warnings in some of the episodes in season two. These warnings advise of depictions of drug use, sexual assault and more. There are even excerpts of the cast talking at the end of each one with a website to go to if you or someone you know needs help.

Sexual assault is one of the bigger pictures that is touched upon in this series, from both female and male perspectives without giving anything away. This is SO important, especially including an incident involving a male because it shows that sexual assault can affect everyone, regardless of who you are.

Even though none of the characters came right out and said they were struggling with mental illnesses, many of the signs and symptoms are there.

I see it way too often on social media and in some movies and television shows; depression and other mental illnesses are romanticized and make it seem as if these issues are not a big deal, but the truth is, they are.

This show explores the side of mental illnesses that aren’t often seen, and even though it can be hard to watch, it needs to be shown in order for us to start a conversation about it. By talking about it, it can help end the stigma that surrounds mental health and hopefully encourages people to get the help they need.

By showing Hannah’s suicide scene at the end of season one, it’s understandable that it may be triggering to those who have survived suicide attempts, but again, it’s important and serves as a conversation starter for those who may not know how to talk about it or their feelings.

It also touches base on not only how Hannah herself feels, but how others are affected by her suicide. We see how Clay, Jessica, Alex and so many other characters deal with the loss, mostly in season two, but we also see how her parents are handling it.

I think diving deeper into the feelings of others after a loved one has committed suicide is important and can show that one’s decision to end their life may end their pain, but passes it onto their loved ones. It’s hopefully an eye-opener to those who are struggling and shows that their loved ones will be left with pain and questions that may never get answered, just like some of the characters in the show.

Again, without giving anything away to anyone who’s yet to see the second season, there are some instances of drug use which can also be a trigger for anyone who may be recovering or comes from a family that uses drugs.

"13 Reasons Why" shows a side of drug use that is frightening, nauseating and heartbreaking all at once with the intention to show what can happen if you fall into a life of drugs. It also shows that no matter how long you are clean, you relapse sometimes, which is all apart of recovery.

It’s no secret that violence plays a big part in this show - and a lot of stems from anger, nervousness and many other emotions and events throughout the show. A lot of times there are consequences that follow these instances of violence and can show that your actions can come back to bite you.

If you are sensitive to the subjects mentioned above, then "13 Reasons Why" may not be ideal for you to view alone, but if you want to see how these subjects are portrayed, I highly recommend watching it with a trusted friend, parent or adult.

I’ve seen way too many times where these subjects were not talked about because it’s hard to, because people don’t know what to say or people can’t find the words to say, and that’s not okay anymore.

There is a negative stigma surrounding all of these issues that need to be broken, and it starts with "13 Reasons Why."

It’s ok not to be ok. It’s ok to be hurt, sad and angry. There are people out there who love you, care about you and want you to get the help you need.

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicidal thoughts, please reach out to someone you trust or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. The Lifeline is available 24 hours a day. Your call will remain confidential.

Cover Image Credit: 13 Reasons Why Official Instagram

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I Tried To Lose Weight All My Life But Couldn't Shed The Pounds Until I Turned To God

Now it's easier than ever and I'm never looking back.

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It's amazing how good it feels to get rid of something that has felt like such a tall barrier in your life for so long. For years, and years, honestly, as many years as I can remember, I have felt held back by my weight. It's something that never truly left my mind, whether it was how I looked in my school uniform skort compared to other girls, how I looked in pictures, the thoughts that raced through my head lying in bed that night, or if what I ordered off the menu would make me look fat. It was always something.

Now I have tried, or so I thought I had. I had tried giving up carbs for two weeks, doing workout videos, or eating healthy, occasionally running, or honestly, anything I thought might help a bit. But there I was after a full year of college, heavier than ever.

It was then that I found my secret ingredient, it was then that I found the ultimate weight-loss secret: Prayer.

I found myself amidst a challenge that I didn't know if I was mentally strong enough to handle, faced against temptations of my wildest food dreams. Canes, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, oh my!

I had never thought once about offering up my prayers to God when it came to my weight. I'm not sure why, honestly. It was something that I had struggled with for so long, that it almost felt normal.

Now, when I feel tempted I ask myself a lot if this is the "abundantly more" that God promises us. If it isn't, then I don't pick it. Strength is a process, just like endurance or habits.

I have learned that by offering up the comparisons I feel at the gym, listening to podcasts while running, or Jesus music while practically swimming in my sweat, I am motivated to keep going, not dragged down by the progress I haven't made. I have learned to thank God for the journey He has taken me on so far, and for giving me the capability to overcome these hurdles.

Jesus Didn't die on the cross and tell us to get our butts out there and make disciples of all the nations just for us to sit and be upset with ourselves and compare ourselves to those tiny pictures on our screens. Let's go, we don't have time for that. We have work to do.

No, I'm not saying that if you pray for Jesus to make you lose 15 pounds, the weight will fall off, but I am saying that through Christ, all things are possible, and with Him by my side, the running doesn't feel as difficult.

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Getting Help Doesn't Mean You're Cured For Life

Sometimes, suffering never ends.

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An artist whom I've adored over the years, Demi Lovato, made headlines when she was no longer sober. And recently, she overdosed on a drug.

In the comment sections on multiple social media platforms, many people have blamed Lovato with harsh judgment such as, "She knew what she was doing, she shouldn't have done it." Or, "I thought she already received help. Stop saying, 'Oh, we're praying for you,' while casting judgment on others who have an addiction."

It's appalling that people think addiction is a choice instead of a strong sensation of needing it. People may have had a choice in starting, but trying to end it is even harder.

You never know what they are going through. Yes, life is hard on everybody, but some people handle it differently than others. For instance, say you're having a really bad week or you're in a really rough situation, and one of the ways to feel better, or at least numb, would be to try drinking. There are many people who drink casually, but sometimes, when people drink it more often, such as once a week, then their body may tolerate alcohol even more.

Just because they are going through a hard time, it doesn't mean people should judge.

You don't know the journey they are on, just as they don't know yours either. If you see someone in need, try and be kind because they might need kindness to get them through.

The more their body is tolerant of it, then the more they might drink. There are thousands of reasons why people might pick up a habit. And if they spiral out of control, then it would be nice if someone they know and love point it out and try to get them help.

Once they received the help that they need, they might seem fine. But they could relapse a year or two later, and they might need help again. Just because they've received it one time, it doesn't mean their life will always be happy and satisfied. Sometimes, it's ok to go receive help over and over again. It really depends on your mindset because I know people who are addicted to something can get through it, but it won't be an easy process. I can only imagine.

Once someone starts a bad habit, it might feel like they need to depend on it because nothing else in this world seems reliable. When really, it might be the habit that's taken over your mind that's telling you, "You need me." It takes over your mind, emotions, actions, and motivation.

Bottom line is, show empathy to someone and try to be in their shoes. If you still can't understand then walk away, but don't be rude.

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