10 Different Strategies To Eliminate Test Anxiety

10 Different Strategies To Eliminate Test Anxiety

A few ways that you can prevent your anxiety from controlling your academic performance.

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One of the most common forms of anxiety for students in both college and high school is test-taking anxiety. Most students will agree that they have experienced anxiety before, during, or after taking a test. For some students, they may experience intense anxiety which can present itself through panic attacks, fainting, sweating, or feeling sick. For any student who is experiencing extreme anxiety, you should consider either seeing a counselor or, if you're in college, going to student disability services to be diagnosed for test anxiety.

However, there are a few strategies you can use to eliminate test anxiety if it isn't too extreme. Here are 10 different strategies that you can use to help eliminate your test anxiety.

1. Try exercising beforehand

Exercise

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Many students don't realize how helpful exercise can be for eliminating stress. I actually tried exercising for 30 minutes a few hours before taking my test, and it did appear to alleviate some of my stress. So if you have the time, try going on a quick walk outside before taking your exam.

2. Maintain a healthy diet

Healthy Food

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Generally, you should avoid any foods that are fatty or contain any sugar before taking your test. Food that is high in fat or sugar can increase anxiety. This also applies to caffeine or sugary beverages. According to the Test Prep Review, the best foods to eat before an exam are light high-protein meals such as toast with peanut butter, tuna, chicken breast, or others. Anything with nuts or eggs will also have pack tons of protein, which can help give you energy before an exam.

3. Take a moment to stop and breathe

Meditate

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This is one of the most important things to consider when managing test anxiety. Often when you start feeling anxiety during a test, you forget to breathe. This can cause your heart rate to speed up, which then causes you to panic. Whether you're in the middle of answering a question or not, stop for one moment and close your eyes. Then slowly breathe in, count to seven, and then breathe out counting to seven. Continue doing this until you feel calm. This will help not only slow down your heart rate, but it will also help eliminate any anxiety.

4. Make sure to study enough beforehand

Studying

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If you don't prepare beforehand for the test, you're likely going to increase the chances of getting anxiety while taking it. Make sure to plan to study for the test in advance! What I tend to do is study at least a week in advance or more depending on how difficult the content may be. The more prepared you are for the test, the more confident you will be while taking it!

5. Get to class early

Class

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Try to get to class early for the exam. Getting to your class early will allow you time to try to focus on relaxing before the test. It's also extremely helpful with being able to talk to any other students. You can also talk with your professor if they show up early for class, ask questions, or express any concerns. Generally, getting to class early before a test is a perfect strategy to use for combating test-taking anxiety!

6. Stop negative thoughts

Positive

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The biggest part of test anxiety is that you fill yourself with negative thoughts that are centered around the test. You may think "I can't do this," or "I'm going to fail." Don't allow negative thoughts to take control of your mindset! Instead, replace the negative thoughts with positive thoughts so that you can change your attitude about your performance on the test.

7. Don't obsess over the time

Time

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The worst thing that you can do is start obsessing over how much time you have left on the exam. This is something that I often find myself doing, especially if I'm taking a timed test. You should still check the time periodically, but don't obsess over keeping track of how much time you have. This can lead to you running out of time since you won't be able to complete any of the questions on your exam. Instead, take a deep breath and focus on completing the questions, skipping the ones that you aren't sure about, and coming back to any questions that you skipped.

8. Focus on guided imagery

Ocean

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What always helps with my anxiety is picturing myself somewhere where I feel the most relaxed. It's good to take a moment before the test to picture yourself somewhere else such as the beach, coffee shop, or at a vacation spot. As long as it's somewhere that relaxes you the most, it will help eliminate any anxiety.

9. Talk to your professor

Professor

Photo by Tra Nguyen on Unsplash

If all else fails, try to talk to your professor. Tell them about your anxiety. They may offer advice or accommodations if you're anxiety isn't severe enough to be diagnosed by a counselor or student disability services.

10. Don't let your grade define you

Test

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Lastly but most importantly, never let your performance on the test define who you are as a person! Test anxiety can relate to judgment over your performance on a test defining who you are as a person. You should never let a test score measure your capability! Before you go to take a test, remind yourself that it is just a test and that your entire future is not completely dependent on it. Even if you fail the test or fail a class, there are still other ways that you can work around the obstacle such as retake the class, find a tutor, or talk to the professor.

If you begin to feel like your test anxiety is starting to take a toll on your performance in your classes, try these strategies to help manage it. I have always struggled with test anxiety, and it really can make things seem harder in college. Following these strategies can help lessen or eliminate your test anxiety, which can help lead to a more successful college experience!

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Let's Talk More About Lori Laughlin Facing Up To 20 Years In Prison When Brock Turner Got 6 Months

And he was released three months early for 'good behavior'... after sexually assaulting an unconscious girl behind a dumpster.

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To start, Lori Laughlin messed up royally, and I don't condone her actions.

If you live under a rock and are unaware of what happened to the "Full House" star, here's the tea:

Lori Laughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli — and like 50 other celebrity parents — were found guilty of conspiracy to commit fraud, and paid a $1 million bail on conspiracy to commit mail fraud, and honest services fraud. You don't need to know what these mean except that she paid $500,000 to get her two daughters, Bella and Olivia Jade Giannulli.

I know you're wondering why they did it — tbh I am too — however, these parents paid the University of Southern California to give admission to her daughters in through the rowing team on campus, despite neither one of them actually playing the sport ever in their life.

Yeah, Aunt Becky messed up and should face punishment, but why is she facing up 20 years when men like Brock Turner are sentenced only six months for raping an unconscious woman behind a dumpster at Stanford?

I hate to bring up the gender card, but I'm pulling it: Why is Lori Laughlin — a woman who with bad judgement who used money to give an upper-hand to her entitled daughters — face more prison time than a man who willingly raped a woman who wasn't in a right state of mine (or any at all!) behind a dumpster of all places.

The answer? Because the system is a mess.

Yeah, Aunt Becky paid for her daughters to get into a school, giving disadvantages to students actually deserving and wanting to attend a college. Her act was immoral, and ultimately selfish, but it doesn't even compare to what Brock Turner did, and it doesn't even effect others as much his rape survivor.

The most that will happen to the Giannulli girls is an expulsion and a temporary poor reputation, however, Emily Doe (the alias of the survivor) will feel the consequences of the attack forever.

There should have been a switch:

Lori Laughlin and the Target guy should have had to pay other students tuition/student debt while facing prison time, while Brock Turner should have had to face over 20 years with more consequences.

But, that'll never happen because our system sucks and society is rigged. I guess our society would prefer a rapist walking around more so a woman who made a poor choice by paying for her daughters to go to a college.

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Dear Anxiety, Thank You For Everything You Do And What You Make Me Do

My anxiety definitely isn't an easy thing to handle, but I wouldn't give it up for the world.

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I've always been a worrier. As long as I can remember, I've spent hours upon hours overthinking even the simplest of things, like whether or not something I mentioned in passing twelve years ago could have upset someone. Even ask my mom, she'll tell you all about the times I used to worry about silly little things since I was able to really worry about things at all. Now, worrying about literally everything that crosses my mind may seem like a hassle, and it is, but I truly don't think I would be where I am today without it.

Anxiety is a bitch. There, I said it. Short and sweet. It sucks, in all honesty, and is one of the hardest things to overcome that I have ever experienced in my lifetime (Not that it's been all that long, but you get what I mean here, right?) I spend so much time worrying that I barely take the time to sit back and look at how much I have accomplished rather than how much I have left to do. For example, I have four assignments and exams standing between me and summer but am I focusing on how little that is to do? Nope. I am spending every waking hour panicking about when and how I'm going to finish that work when I know full well that I have more than enough time to do so.

Yes, my anxiety keeps me from seeing the positives sometimes, but it really does motivate me. I mean, why else would I be up at three in the morning writing a paper that's due in a week when I work at 7 a.m. and have more than enough time in the next week to do it? Thanks to anxiety, I'll be exhausted for the next 24 hours, but hey, that work that doesn't need to be done for a long time is done and I can sleep later. Or so I think right now. I'm sure some little assignment or task will pop up that I have to finish by June that I feel the need to cram for right now.

So I guess this is my thank you to my anxiety. Thanks for motivating me by causing daily breakdowns over dropping a bobby pin behind my mini fridge or a page long paper that I have to turn in in two months. Thank you for keeping me on my toes constantly and pushing me so hard that I somehow ended up so far ahead in my classes. Where would I be without you? Probably a lot calmer, but with piles of assignments to finish at an appropriate time.

Thanks for everything you do - and make me do.

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