Something Relative
Start writing a post
Student Life

Something Relative

1: Over the Line

6
Something Relative
De'Juan McDuell

“Accidents only exist in our heads, in our limited perceptions.” ~ Franz Kafka

The moment slowed into a scene from The Matrix minus the slow eruption of bullets, techno music, and black leather clothing. His car drifted over the agreed upon yellow barrier dotted down the center of opposing traffic. I knew…I knew, that he would jerk the steering wheel to his right and release relieved wind over the backdrop of a thundering heartbeat. He didn’t. Instead I jerked my wheel to my right hoping that the biggest obstacle would be maneuvering out of a ditch. The fan wafted heat into an atmosphere that struggled to dissipate the cold January air. The engine pumped with sluggish power as the exhaust spit out gaseous remnants of unrenewable fossil fuels. I heard nothing. My car swerved on a cloud until the smack of metal on metal splashed into the pale blue interior.


rel∙a∙tive (adjective) – measured or considered in comparison with each other or with something else

I tutored math during my undergraduate studies. One of my students was far too advanced to for his placement, but came to the sessions because it was mandatory for his current program. Tim never had questions. Instead, I quizzed him. I searched through the most complex problems of the current math section finding a mere handful that he couldn’t answer. There were a few that I couldn’t answer, either.

The room was full with just the two of us. Tutoring at 8 AM; even when the sun shone full, it was too early for most students to even consider attending a half hour tutoring session. Our voices bounced off the close, cement walls as we calculated how much money Lil’ Kim would make for every second that passed during her concert in 2001. I never remembered the number, but it was as obscene as she was.


“Accident is something relative. It appears only at the point of intersection of inevitable processes.” ~ George Plekhanov

When you’re fortunate enough to walk away from a car accident, your mind flickers through a checklist of semi-automated actions. It’s almost always the same process:

1. Curse (aloud or under your breath).

2. Make sure you and any passengers are okay.

3. Make your way out of the vehicle to assess the damage.

4. Look around. How are the other driver(s), passenger(s), vehicle(s)?

5. Thank God you and anyone else are okay.

These moments melt like vinyl left in southern summer sun. Sooner or later someone remembers to exchange information or the police arrive at the scene with obnoxious lights drawing what little attention you haven’t already acquired. Traffic in the street crawls by, and various drivers express their concerns for you. But you’re okay.

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
Featured

To The Boy Who Changed Me

Just another open letter from a crazy ex-girlfriend.

993
http://cdn1.theodysseyonline.com/files/2015/10/09/635800144722553570-908383045_993037_10201471592537019_550485816_n.jpg

You’re probably thinking, “oh sh*t, my ex is writing a hate letter and a tell-all about our roller coaster tycoon relationship with terrible fallout.” But if you’re thinking that, oh honey you’re wrong. This isn’t some sappy pity party nonsense and it’s not a trash-my-ex tell all; it’s a journey. And it’s my side of our story to tell…

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Dear College Students, Are You Undecided?

The Girlfriend's Guide to College

3891
Dear College Students, Are You Undecided?
https://pixabay.com/photos/college-students-diploma-graduate-3990783/

Up until last week, I always had a major. I was an international business major, finance major, psych major on the pre-medicine track… and now (finally) I am exactly where I should have been when I started college: undecided. I think there is too much pressure as a high school student to have a designated path about what you want to study, be when you 'grow up' and essentially spend the rest of your life doing. As an 18-year-old, I really feel like I tried to pin myself down to a major so that I had a set path to follow and something to look towards. This is probably very conventional and I know tons of people at school who have their minds made up about what they want to study.

Keep Reading... Show less
Adulting

Life Is Messy

Finding who you are in your 20s

3833
Life Is Messy
https://www.pexels.com/photo/shallow-focus-photography-of-yellow-sunflower-field-under-sunny-sky-1169084/

I am 25 years old and just now learning who I am. When I separated from my husband I was terrified of what would follow. I did not know who I was outside of a relationship, nor did I know how to be on my own. It was scary, and I was so lost. I spent months discovering who I was, and what I wanted to be. I am still searching as I believe we never truly know who we are even when we "grow up". I came to the realization that I had been hiding a part of myself for my entire life. Coming out was not easy, growing up in the church made it scary, and hard. I was told growing up that being anything but straight was such a sin, and that i would spent my life in hell because of it. I came out to my parents when I was 25 years old. I picked up the phone and called my mom, and uttered the words "I'm queer" through tears. I knew my parents would be supportive, but that didn't make it any easier for me to vulnerable and raw. Since then, I have slowly started being more authentic in who I am, and not hide parts of me just because of people's shitty opinions.

Keep Reading... Show less
Adulting

Ask Your BFF These 20 Questions To See If They Know You As Well As You THINK That They Do

Ask your best friend these basic questions to see just how well they know you.

42021
Ask Your BFF These 20 Questions To See If They Know You As Well As You THINK That They Do

My best friend has been in my life since we were 3 years old, now that we are adults now, I'd like to ask her these questions to see how well she knows me.

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Alone At The Met

I survive a day alone in NYC.

11500
Wikimedia Commons

It was six in the evening. I was sitting in the courtyard of a Renaissance-era Italian villa, glancing around at the statues, most notably one of a boy removing a thorn from his foot. Despite the supposedly relaxing setting, I was incredibly anxious. My phone was at less than 5 percent battery, and once it died I would be completely disconnected from my family and peers, alone in one of the largest art museums in the country.

Keep Reading... Show less

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Facebook Comments