The laziness of mankind is an abstract concept that can easily be defined and combated, but continuously tempts each and every one of us in all aspects of our lives. However, it seems that the more insignificant a task is, the easier it is to give in to that activity. If a one-point assignment in a graded curriculum totaling 1200 points is due at midnight, is it really worth the stress and time to get that measly assignment in?

But such small events are always surrounded by context; the parties involved, the possible likely outcomes, consequences of such decisions. Usually, these small actions don't have any effect on outward appearance, but when left all by themselves, a person's true nature starts to show, especially when concerning mundane choices.

One such situation, as cleverly named by my friend Emma, is referred to as the Shopping Cart Dilemma: What a person does with the shopping cart after their finished with it subtly determines who they really are. People are often split into two different groups: those who put the shopping carts back, and those who don't. Some people are just innately good, and their authenticity is confirmed when they put the cart they use back into the cart corral.

However, there are those who decide to, after using those carts, leave them in empty parking spaces, or just roll it to the side for someone else to put away. There are attendants for those, yet it is still a rather unnecessary action.

However, such frivolous things shouldn't be divided so simply: more often than not, that one choice doesn't come down to two flat roads; it branches and twists to the alignment of the user. Even then, there are those who choose to walk down darker roads, roads that should be left untraveled.

There are people who leave shopping carts in parking spaces, adjacent to their own out of laziness. There are people who leave their shopping carts in the most inconvenient places for employees of the shop. There are those who bring their shopping carts around in different stores, and those who neglect their use for the otherwise more convenient basket.

People pass judgment on such people quickly and decisively, unannounced to the 'victim.' If your actions appear good and help others out, then by all means continue; you're doing a service to us all. But for the people who choose shopping carts, just know they are judged for what they do, by attendants who must pick the carts up after the close, or the unfortunate fellow who has to re-park in a different place because of someone else's lack of care.