6 Signs You Grew Up In A Small Town

6 Signs You Grew Up In A Small Town

It has its pros and cons.
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Small towns can be great. They're safe, and sometimes knowing everyone is nice. But there's also times when it's not so nice, like when all you want is to get through the grocery store in your sweatpants without running into anyone you know. There are definitely pros and cons, but here are some signs that you live in a small town.


1. The nurses at the doctor's office recognize you.

I went to the doctor today, and I haven't been there in the three years since I've been in school. Despite the fact that I've grown up–a little–changed my hair, and that they see many patients every day, I was still recognized. Yes, I know I've grown up. Yes, I'm driving now. Yes, school is going well. Can you give me some meds now?


2. You also know everyone at your favorite restaurant.

Every town has that one restaurant that everyone goes to. For me, it's the Dog House, and I've been going there since I was little with my mother. I eat there every time I'm home, and they still bring my drink order as soon as I sit down. It's not a visit home without a trip to get the best burger in town.


3. You know all the shortcuts.

You know all the back roads, all the cut-throughs and all the stoplights along the way. There's always an easier way to get across town, and you know them all.

4. Your grandmother's friends also recognize you.

As I left my favorite coffee shop today, a nice little old lady told me hello and asked how school is going. I had a brief conversation, and I still don't know who she is. I can safely say, however, that she is a friend of my grandmother's. Whether that's a perk or a downside of small-town life, I'm still not sure.


5. No one knows where you're from.

Ice-breakers are never fun, but they're even worse when you have to explain your town. Inevitably, you settle for saying the nearest city or just the county, with a shrug and mutter about small-town life\

6. You can't wear sweatpants out of the house without running into someone you know.

Sometimes pants are just too difficult. Everyone needs a day to just relax and chill, but sometimes you also have to go to the store on the same day. Unfortunately, there's no way to avoid seeing someone you know. With any luck, they'll realize it's your vacation day, but there's always the chance that they'll ask if you're sick.


There are certainly times when being in a small town gets tiring. But growing up in a small, safe, tight-knit community definitely has its perks. Knowing your neighbors, how to get around town and being near your family is great; you wouldn't trade it for anything else.

Cover Image Credit: Pixabay

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50 One-Liners College Girls Swap With Their Roomies As Much As They Swap Clothes

"What would I do without you guys???"
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1. "Can I wear your shirt out tonight?"

2. "Does my hair look greasy?"

3. "We should probably clean tomorrow..."

4. "What should I caption this??"

5. "Is it bad if I text ____ first??"

6. "Should we order pizza?"

7. *Roommate tells an entire story* "Wait, what?"

8. "How is it already 3 AM?"

9. "I need a drink."

10. "McDonalds? McDonalds."

11. "GUESS WHAT JUST HAPPENED."

12. "Okay like, for real, I need to study."

13. "Why is there so much hair on our floor?"

14. "I think I'm broke."

15. "What do I respond to this?"

16. "Let's have a movie night."

17. "Why are we so weird?"

18. "Do you think people will notice if I wear this 2 days in a row?"

19. "That guy is so stupid."

20. "Do I look fat in this?"

21. "Can I borrow your phone charger?

22. "Wanna go to the lib tonight?"

23. "OK, we really need to go to the gym soon."

24. "I kinda want some taco bell."

25. "Let's go out tonight."

26. "I wonder what other people on this floor think of us."

27. "Let's go to the mall."

28. "Can I use your straightener?"

29. "I need coffee."

30. "I'm bored, come back to the room."

31. "Should we go home this weekend?"

32. "We should probably do laundry soon."

33. "Can you see through these pants?"

34. "Sometimes I feel like our room is a frat house..."

35. "Guys I swear I don't like him anymore."

36."Can I borrow a pencil?"

37. "I need to get my life together...."

38. "So who's buying the Uber tonight?"

39. "Let's walk to class together."

40. "Are we really pulling an all-nighter tonight?"

41. "Who's taking out the trash?"

42. "What happened last night?"

43. "Can you help me do my hair?"

44. "What should I wear tonight?"

45. "You're not allowed to talk to him tonight."

46. "OMG, my phone is at 1 percent."

47. "Should we skip class?"

48. "What should we be for Halloween?"

49. "I love our room."

50. "What would I do without you guys???"

Cover Image Credit: Hannah Gabaldon

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Being An Underdog Is A Hard Pill To Swallow, But It's The Best Victory You'll Earn

Be prepared to be underestimated and to turn heads.

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In the past few years, I have noticed l have been labeled as an underdog, even if the direct term wasn't always used to describe me. Whether it was running for officer positions or in life in general, I have been an underdog.

According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, an Underdog is:

a loser or predicted loser in a struggle or contest.

When I first came to this realization, that people considered me an underdog in things, I felt embarrassed and hurt. People underestimated me; my strengths weren't on the surface. It definitely was a self-confidence killer, but as time has passed and I've thought about it before, I am proud to be an underdog.

I remember my senior year of high school when people were surprised I was selected to compete on an academic team and that I had the second highest grade in my Advanced Chemistry class.

People assumed I wasn't smart enough, and I had people chasing me down the hallway questioning what my GPA was or what my ACT score was.

Being upset, a few people made comments that I heard, and it definitely deflated my attitude about competing. It seemed that hardly anyone believed I was capable of being smart because I wasn't in the top 10% of my class or maybe because I wasn't vocal about how challenging my classes were. I worked hard, always trying to better myself, and hoping to achieve my goals, no matter if it was academic or personal. Even if some of my classmates didn't see the potential in me, my chemistry teacher did and the took a chance on me. Sometimes being quiet and focusing on the work you have been given, takes you off people's radar of achieving success.

Underdogs are all over pop culture and in history.

Whether it was Average Joe's from the movie "Dodgeball," David against Goliath in the Bible, or during March Madness when that one team no one expected to do well and then they wreck everyone's brackets.

My personal favorite underdog is Alex Karev from "Grey's Anatomy."

He came from a not stable or safe home when he was young, had to work, fight, and sometimes lie to become the doctor he is now. When he first came to work at the hospital, he was not on people's radars of success and not a favorite character in the TV Show, but slowly you became to love Karev and hope he keeps reaching for the stars. Being an underdog might mean you face uphill battles, doubts, and shocked faces, but those moments will motivate you to do more and be more. They are the people or teams, once they start being successful, you cheer for in hopes that the underdog will win. The concept that "everyone loves an underdog" comes this, but in the end, success, whether you are an underdog or not, can bring people hating you on the flip side.

Realizing you are an underdog can be a hard pill to swallow, but I realized this is one of my strengths. I have learned to fight for what I believe in, work harder than ever before, and to brush myself off and keep moving if I fail. Being an underdog, I have experienced the rollercoaster of emotions you have while competing. I have experienced the crushing feeling of being underappreciated and the extreme high of achieving your dreams. If you are labeled as an underdog, feel proud of yourself. Not everyone may see your strengths, but the people who matter will. As long as you believe in yourself and remember who you are, you will continuously succeed, no matter the outcome, and surprise the world.

Cover Image Credit:

Corrine Harding

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