Why You Should Find The Value In Failure

Why You Should Find The Value In Failure

Learn to do the things that terrify us the most.
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Now that I’m at the completion of my first year of college, I’ve been spending a lot of time reflecting on all of the life lessons I have learned during my first experiences of “adulthood.” I’ve learned that it’s true, frat boys really are the worst, the “freshman 15” is the real deal, and that adulthood consists of a LOT of calls to mom… and I mean a lot.

But most importantly, I’ve learned the value in failure.

Finding the value and comfort in failure was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do, but it has been by far the most rewarding. When I entered “adulthood” I felt on top of the world and was brought my reality check way too quickly.I began to notice I was walking on eggshells in fear of something not going my way. I feared the day that I made a bad grade on a test, I feared rejection of any sort and I feared the inevitable day of when I had to learn those really hard life lessons. Although these fears are completely rational, I'm sure most of you are probably able to empathize, but I realized that this is not a way to live a life. I wish I was telling you this from a sudden epiphany I had, not a hard, cold lesson I had to learn, but fortunately, I’m not.I had to be thrown into the bad to be able to learn to love the good. I had to realize that failure is simply a part of human nature. I noticed that my generation has been taught and conceptualized that failure should be avoided at all times. For example, growing up we’re given participation awards for falling below expectations because failure is just way too tough of a concept for anyone to have to accept.But by avoiding the failure, we have suddenly begun to fail, but not in the beautiful kind of way, in an "I'm completely blind to the world" kind of way.We have been taught by society and created the habit of treating the word “failure” like it’s the worst “f-word” in the English language and that it doesn’t exist. We have suddenly become okay with being emotionally unaware on the raw and pure emotion that failure brings you.But I’m here to tell you that it’s okay to have failed that test, to face rejection and to be faced with those really hard life lessons. To all millennials, IT’S OKAY FOR BAD STUFF TO HAPPEN TO YOU.Although none of us want to fail, and we should all aim for better days, we have to look at failure as another experience under our belts, as cliché as that sounds. I realized that every truly successful human being has experienced failure. Every amazing resumé has a hidden list of failures that person had to experience to be able to earn the list of successes. Nothing worthwhile comes easy so what are we all so afraid of? Most knowledge is able to be found with easy access from the internet, but the life lesson of failure is something that can't be taught, but has to be experienced. We should all learn to be more well-rounded people that don't obsess over perfection. We should all learn to stop looking at the road ahead of us in a half-blind manner. We should all learn to accept the challenge and beauty of failure as it brings some of life's best lessons. And last, we should learn to do the things that terrify us the most.
Cover Image Credit: OzEssay

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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The Only National Emergency Is How Much Control We've Given The Federal Government

Can we build a wall around the swamp instead?

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Earlier this year, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency to secure funds for a portion of his border wall. Currently, lawsuits upon lawsuits are being filed against Trump and this declaration, citing the inappropriateness of bypassing Congress for a project like a border wall.

While many disagree on the term "border crisis," there is one thing we should be able to agree on: our government is the real crisis.

Instead of a representative government, we have enabled a government set out to control many aspects of our personal lives. You must have health insurance, car insurance, you can't decide your own healthcare, and soon you won't be able to serve our country if you're trans... the list goes on and on.

Our country was founded on the idea of a limited government with more power given to individual states. In the 243 years since our country was established this ideal has gone out the window. While some of this change has been useful (FDA regulations and EPA guidelines) much of it has surpassed the power of the states and the people.

We have become too complacent in allowing our government to run our lives.

If we want to see actual change, we need to recognize the hyper-control of the government as the real national threat, not exaggerated threats from the border or claims about those seeking a new life in our country.

The administration is seeking to divide our country to weaken it so that we won't question their imaginary crises and outdated policies. If we want change we must fight against this separation and start being informed at the polls and advocating for policies that reflect our country's values rather than the values of those in power.

We can't let ourselves be separated by the body meant to keep us together.

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