11 Quick And Easy Grammar Lessons If You Haven't Paid Attention Since 2nd Grade

11 Quick And Easy Grammar Lessons If You Haven't Paid Attention Since 2nd Grade

Is it "their," "they're," or "there?"

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Rules of grammar: you learned them in school, but have since completely forgotten about them. As texting and texting shortcuts became more popular, grammar became less relevant. People stopped caring about the rules, and started saying whatever they felt was most convenient.

Unfortunately, the shortcuts people use have lead to misunderstandings about the proper use of certain words and phrases. So, here are some quick clarifications about common mistakes that most people make every day.

1. You're vs. your.

"You're" is a contraction of the words "you" and "are," while "your" indicates possession.

Example: You're going to get your phone fixed.

In the example, you are going to do something (get your phone fixed), and the phone belongs to you (making it your phone).

2. There vs. their vs. they're.

"There" indicates location, "their" indicated possession, and "they're" is a contraction of the words "they" and "are."

Example: They're going to get their phones fixed at the store over there.

In this sentence, the group of people (they) ARE going (they're) to get their phones fixed (the phones belong to them) at a store at over there (specifying the location).

3. Than vs. then.

"Than" is used to make comparisons while "then" usually signifies timing.

Example: Back then, it was harder to get a phone fixed than it is now.

In the example, "then" refers to a time that has passed, and "than" compares the current status to what is used to be.

4. "Affect" vs. "effect."

In most cases, "effect" is a noun and "affect" is a verb.

Example: The effects of smoking can really affect the people surrounding the smoker.

In this example, the "effects" are the results and consequences of smoking (which are nouns) and "affect" is what smoking does to bystanders (a verb).

5. It's could HAVE not could of.

Whether it's after "could," "should" or "would," the word "of" is never correct. Because of their contractions with "have" (could've, should've, and would've), people mistake the words that are being combined.

Example: She could/should/would have stopped smoking, but she decided she didn't want to.

In the above example, no matter which past modal you use, "have" is the word that follows.

If you were to use the contracted forms of the words (could've, should've, would've), when spoken, it can sound like "could of," "should of," and "would of," which is where the confusion usually comes from. But I promise, it's "have."


6. I vs. me.

Honestly, just watch this video.

7. Accept vs. except.

The word "accept" is when you receive or welcome something while the world "except" is used to exclude something.

Example: The manager accepted all of the applicants except for one girl.

In the example, the manager took (accepted) all of the applicants, but excluded one girl (meaning he excepted her).

8. It's vs. its.

The word "it's" is a contraction of "it" and "is," and the word "its" (without the apostrophe) indicates possession.

Example: It's really sad that the team didn't win its game.

If you get rid of "It's," you can substitute "it is," which confirms that the apostrophe was used correctly to form the contraction. "Its" then suggests possession, as the game belonged to the team.

This can be confusing since normally when you have a word with " 's " after it, it signifies possession. However with "it," it is actually the opposite.

9. To vs. too vs. two.

"To" is a preposition, "too" means "also," and "two" is the number 2.

Example: She is going to quit smoking in two days too.

In the example, "to" comes before an infinitive, she is going to quit in not 1 but 2 days ("two"), and she is going to quit as well as the other person ("too").

10. Apart vs. a part.

The word "apart" is an adverb that means separate, while a "part" is a noun meaning a piece of something. Many people say they are "apart of a group" when it should really be "a part of a group."

Example: I am so lucky to be a part of a family that rarely spends time apart.

In the example, the person speaking is excited about being in a family ("a part" of a family) that rarely spends time away from each other ("apart").

11. Farther vs. further.

Simply put, "farther" is used for literal distance and "further" is used metaphorically, and can also be used as a verb.

Example: "Since I broke my leg, I don't know how much farther I should walk, as I don't know if it will further the pain."

In the sentence, the person doesn't know how much "farther" (more of a distance) he or she should walk because the person is worried he or she is going to make the pain even worse ("further" the pain).

Happy speaking properly!

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8 Things You Should Never Say To An Education Major

"Is your homework just a bunch of coloring?"
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Yes, I'm an Education major, and yes, I love it. Your opinion of the field won't change my mind about my future. If you ever happen to come across an Education major, make sure you steer clear of saying these things, or they might hold you in from recess.

1. "Is your homework just a bunch of coloring?"

Um, no, it's not. We write countless lesson plans and units, match standards and objectives, organize activities, differentiate for our students, study educational theories and principles, and write an insane amount of papers on top of all of that. Sometimes we do get to color though and I won't complain about that.

2. "Your major is so easy."

See above. Also, does anyone else pay tuition to have a full-time job during their last semester of college?

3. "It's not fair that you get summers off."

Are you jealous? Honestly though, we won't really get summers off. We'll probably have to find a second job during the summer, we'll need to keep planning, prepping our classroom, and organizing to get ready for the new school year.

4. “That's a good starter job."

Are you serious..? I'm not in this temporarily. This is my career choice and I intend to stick with it and make a difference.

5. “That must be a lot of fun."

Yes, it definitely is fun, but it's also a lot of hard work. We don't play games all day.

6. “Those who can't, teach."

Just ugh. Where would you be without your teachers who taught you everything you know?

7. “So, you're basically a babysitter."

I don't just monitor students, I teach them.

8. “You won't make a lot of money."

Ah yes, I'm well aware, thanks for reminding me. Teachers don't teach because of the salary, they teach because they enjoy working with students and making a positive impact in their lives.

Cover Image Credit: BinsAndLabels

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7 Reasons Why Being An Education Major Is The Best Decision You Can Make In College

Everyone has pride in their major, but us education majors are ones to beat.

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Before and throughout college, I changed my major roughly five times. It was such a tough decision for me, but I finally landed on the perfect one for me and that was education. Here are the reasons why being an education major is hands down the best:

1. We get to help others 

A huge reason I stepped into this degree was because I knew I would get to make a difference - small or large.

2. We play a big part in how the future will look like 

Did you ever think about that? Teachers get to help shape the kids of the future by how the classroom is run.

3. Studying education makes you appreciate education 

I have always loved school, but not as much as I do now. I have found a strong passion for education and the value it holds.

4. We get to be role models 

Some of those kids who walk through the door won't have anyone at home rooting for them, or they will, but your encouragement and push will help drive them to succeed.

5. We get to create a fun and effective learning environment 

I have learned what I do and do not want my classroom environment to be just through the teachers that I have had.

6. No one can do my job without the teaching license 

This for me has created job security knowing that no one can take my job without also having gone through the education, student teaching, and testing that I have.

7. Teachers will ALWAYS be needed 

Education will never go away, so neither will we as teachers.

I am honored, to say the least, to be able to be a teacher one day. It is something that I cherish and will work my hardest at being one of the greats.

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