11 Quick And Easy Grammar Lessons If You Haven't Paid Attention Since 2nd Grade

11 Quick And Easy Grammar Lessons If You Haven't Paid Attention Since 2nd Grade

Is it "their," "they're," or "there?"

666
views

Rules of grammar: you learned them in school, but have since completely forgotten about them. As texting and texting shortcuts became more popular, grammar became less relevant. People stopped caring about the rules, and started saying whatever they felt was most convenient.

Unfortunately, the shortcuts people use have lead to misunderstandings about the proper use of certain words and phrases. So, here are some quick clarifications about common mistakes that most people make every day.

1. You're vs. your.

"You're" is a contraction of the words "you" and "are," while "your" indicates possession.

Example: You're going to get your phone fixed.

In the example, you are going to do something (get your phone fixed), and the phone belongs to you (making it your phone).

2. There vs. their vs. they're.

"There" indicates location, "their" indicated possession, and "they're" is a contraction of the words "they" and "are."

Example: They're going to get their phones fixed at the store over there.

In this sentence, the group of people (they) ARE going (they're) to get their phones fixed (the phones belong to them) at a store at over there (specifying the location).

3. Than vs. then.

"Than" is used to make comparisons while "then" usually signifies timing.

Example: Back then, it was harder to get a phone fixed than it is now.

In the example, "then" refers to a time that has passed, and "than" compares the current status to what is used to be.

4. "Affect" vs. "effect."

In most cases, "effect" is a noun and "affect" is a verb.

Example: The effects of smoking can really affect the people surrounding the smoker.

In this example, the "effects" are the results and consequences of smoking (which are nouns) and "affect" is what smoking does to bystanders (a verb).

5. It's could HAVE not could of.

Whether it's after "could," "should" or "would," the word "of" is never correct. Because of their contractions with "have" (could've, should've, and would've), people mistake the words that are being combined.

Example: She could/should/would have stopped smoking, but she decided she didn't want to.

In the above example, no matter which past modal you use, "have" is the word that follows.

If you were to use the contracted forms of the words (could've, should've, would've), when spoken, it can sound like "could of," "should of," and "would of," which is where the confusion usually comes from. But I promise, it's "have."


6. I vs. me.

Honestly, just watch this video.

7. Accept vs. except.

The word "accept" is when you receive or welcome something while the world "except" is used to exclude something.

Example: The manager accepted all of the applicants except for one girl.

In the example, the manager took (accepted) all of the applicants, but excluded one girl (meaning he excepted her).

8. It's vs. its.

The word "it's" is a contraction of "it" and "is," and the word "its" (without the apostrophe) indicates possession.

Example: It's really sad that the team didn't win its game.

If you get rid of "It's," you can substitute "it is," which confirms that the apostrophe was used correctly to form the contraction. "Its" then suggests possession, as the game belonged to the team.

This can be confusing since normally when you have a word with " 's " after it, it signifies possession. However with "it," it is actually the opposite.

9. To vs. too vs. two.

"To" is a preposition, "too" means "also," and "two" is the number 2.

Example: She is going to quit smoking in two days too.

In the example, "to" comes before an infinitive, she is going to quit in not 1 but 2 days ("two"), and she is going to quit as well as the other person ("too").

10. Apart vs. a part.

The word "apart" is an adverb that means separate, while a "part" is a noun meaning a piece of something. Many people say they are "apart of a group" when it should really be "a part of a group."

Example: I am so lucky to be a part of a family that rarely spends time apart.

In the example, the person speaking is excited about being in a family ("a part" of a family) that rarely spends time away from each other ("apart").

11. Farther vs. further.

Simply put, "farther" is used for literal distance and "further" is used metaphorically, and can also be used as a verb.

Example: "Since I broke my leg, I don't know how much farther I should walk, as I don't know if it will further the pain."

In the sentence, the person doesn't know how much "farther" (more of a distance) he or she should walk because the person is worried he or she is going to make the pain even worse ("further" the pain).

Happy speaking properly!

Popular Right Now

10 Dorm Room Hacks

The Basics For College Living
56805
views

Any college student will tell you that dorm rooms are small and have limited amounts of space to utilize. Combine that with having to share your room with someone else and the usable space shrinks to half its size. Closet space is probably the worst. Before you go back to school every semester, you probably debate with yourself about what you can bring with you to school and what you have to leave at home simply because there's limited room. There's some simple solutions to these problems. Have no fear, dorm room hacks is here!


1. Furniture Arrangement

If your dorm allows you to rearrange your furniture, this chart is a lifesaver. Before you move all your stuff into your room, you definitely need to figure out if your furniture is where you want it to be. Some times it's hard to decide what set up works the best. Pick a set up that allows you to have the most floor space in your dorm room. And no worries if you don't like the set up you choose the first time, you can always change it later if you don't like it.

2. Maximize Closet Space

This is a classic for limited closet space. Most closets will have a close rod that sits high enough off the ground for this hack. Adding the pop tab allows you to create a second row for hanging clothes, and because this second row hangs lower that the first it allows for the ultimate usage of closet space.

3. Brighten Things Up

While we are on the topic of dorm closets, this is a hack to help with closet lighting. The lighting in your dorm room will vary simply based on the layout on the dorm you are in. This hack is especially helpful for those who have a closet with little to no lighting. Simply take a strand of clear Christmas lights (or colored if you so please), and string them along the inside border of the door. Run an extension cord underneath the door to an outlet in your room. Voila! Enjoy your newly lit closet space.

4. Get Yourself Some Shelves

When living in a dorm room, shelves are your best friend. You're going to have limited floor space. There's no way to avoid it. However, you will have a good amount of vertical space. Shelves will help you to utilize your vertical space. Shelves like you see in the above picture are helpful for culinary supplies such as refrigerators, coffee makers, microwaves, plates, bowls, and silverware. Storage shelves are very helping in keeping items organized. There are also shelves available that sit on top of desks to utilize space, as well as shelves that fit around toilets in the bathroom. So wherever you need extra space, shelves are there to help.

5. Store On Your Door

Utilizing door space also helps when it comes to extra space. Aside from the obvious method of using an over-the-door hanger. The hack you see pictured is great for food storage. Ideally this hanger is used for shoes, so that is also an option if you don't have a spot for your footwear. In this case, it is used to help organize and store your food items. This hanger has also been used to organize and hold jewelry items as well.

6. Keep Things Fresh

The best kind of dorm hacks is when you use items in an outside of the box type of way. By using a car deodorant clip, you can utilize your dorm room's air vent to allow a continuous, fresh smell into your room. And....

In the case that your dorm still runs on older AC units, you can apply the same ideology by laying a dryer sheet or two over the vent openings on the unit while it is on.

7. The Power Of Command Strips

I highly recommend tapestries as a method for decorating a dorm room, especially if you have a big wall space to cover. Tapestries come in many sizes, as well as different designs that range from patterns to real-life pictures. However, tapestries can be tricky to put up. Many dorms wont allow you to use nails or push pins when decorating. This hack allows you to use command strips and clothes pins to work with this rule. While the focus of this hack is on tapestries, it is worth it to say that command strips are awesome for decorating and are worth the investment.


8. Fill The Gap

So what exactly is the point of putting a pool noodle next to your bed? Typically dorm beds cannot get pushed close enough to the wall to prevent there being a gap between the bed and the wall. Because of this, items tend to fall through the gap to the floor. I cannot tell you how many times this happened with my phone during my first semester of college. By laying a pool noodle in this gap, you can help prevent any items falling through the gap. Pool noodles also have another use for one's dorm bed. Many dorms have bunk beds or have beds that can be lofted. I had to stay on the top of a bunk bed one time that didn't have a side railing. I was so worried about rolling of the bed at night. I've had friends that have the same worry with lofted beds. Using a pool noodle, you can rest this fear. Place the pool noodle on the outside edge on top of the mattress underneath your fitted sheet. Keeping the noodle in place, pull the sheet over the noodle, and tuck it back in. The pool noodle now acts as a barrier for your body whenever you role over in your sleep.

9. Fold Strategically

This is one of my favorite dorm hacks I've ever come across. I tried it with my drawers and I'm never going back. As stated before, you will have limited dorm space. This includes drawer space. By using this folding method, you can not only fit more pieces of clothing in a drawer, but it also keeps your drawer organized by allowing you to see what article of clothing you are looking at without disrupting the whole drawers.

10. Protect Your Hair Ties

Obviously this hack is aimed toward females students, but if you are a male participating in the man-bun trend then this may be helpful to you as well! When you go to college, you will lose more hair ties than you have ever lost in your life. I will start a semester with a hundred hair times and will end the semester with two. I don't understand it. I don't know where they go. I just know they disappear. Use this hack and avoid the frustration that is losing hair ties.

These were only ten hacks for your dorm room. There are plenty more hacks available out there, you simply just have to search. Hopefully this article helped you get started on the basic dorm hacks to make college life a little easier.

Cover Image Credit: SoJenCellars

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

5 Struggles That Coming Home For The Summer Pose

Summer isn't always what you think it's going to be, especially when you're coming home.

82
views

Summer break is amazing in so many ways: you're given countless hours to yourself, no daily stresses concerning school and assignments, and no overbearing pressures to go out every single night. However, coming home (usually) means you're back living with your parents and back to abiding by their rules, despite the fact that for around ten months, you were the only person making the rules in your own home. Despite the perks that come with summer, I have composited 10 reasons why summer can be hard to bear.

1. Having a set curfew.

I find it almost comical that I was able to "run free" for 10 months in Tallahassee with no regard for what time it was, but while at home I get the "it's time to come home" text from my parents as soon as 11 o'clock rolls around. For the entire school year, I was able to stay at friends' places until the sun came up, at walk out of clubs around closing time with no fear of getting punished for staying out too late, but now, I have to constantly plan around my curfew and ensure that I'm home before I get on my parents' bad side.

2. Having to get a summer job.

It was always a rule in my house that jobs were only meant for summer since my parents felt that getting good grades were our primary priority, so now that school's out, I'm working at my local Panera and dog-sitting for my neighbors, even though I absolutely hate dogs. Working isn't the worst thing I've had to do, but when I have to miss beach days and parties for a job that only pays $9 an hour, it sucks!

3. Countless days of boredom. 

College has made me accustomed to being surrounded by other people and activities 24/7. Sure, there were a couple of hours a day for alone time, but the majority of my day was spent hanging out with friends, going to my sorority, going out, and attending class. Now that I'm home and far away from my friends and the social aspect of FSU, I find myself bored and lonely.

4. Less freedom and independence. 

While away at school, I was able to do pretty much anything I wanted without my parents finding out. I was able to go get fast food in the middle of the night, go out to clubs, and sleep at my friends' place whenever I wanted. Sadly, now that I'm home, I can't just leave whenever I want or do whatever I want; I have to tell my parents when I'm going to places, where I'm going, who I'm meeting, and when exactly I'll be home.

5. Having to unpack and sort through your old clothes and the ones you brought to school.

Being the youngest has gifted me with an overabundance of hand-me-downs, everything from prom dresses to shoes to jewelry. However, over the years, the amount of clothes I have accumulated is insane; coming home has forced me to sort through the piles of old clothes and things I don't want anymore in order to make room for the multiple suitcases I brought back from school. My room looks like a tornado swept through it for three weeks now, despite the countless hours I have spent organizing, donating, and folding.

Related Content

Facebook Comments