10 Of The Prettiest Towns In Alabama & Why You Should Visit

10 Of The Prettiest Towns In Alabama And Why You Should Visit Them ASAP

"Where the skies are so blue..."

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From the beaches to the mountains, from the dirt roads to the interstates, from the farm towns to the big cities, Alabama "the beautiful" is truly just that.

Several of the cutest towns in America lie within the Alabama borders, and here is a comprehensive list of the 10 cutest towns that every Alabamian (and those who aren't fortunate enough to live in the Heart of Dixie) should visit.

10. Langston

Nestled between Guntersville Lake and mountains cascading northeastern Alabama, Langston is a beautiful town just south of Scottsboro known for its fishing and camping grounds.

9. Wetumpka

Wetumpka is a quaint, historic town that lies just northeast of the state capital. Ravaged by a tornado in January 2019, relief efforts are continuing to be made to revive the beauty of this thriving central Alabama town.f

8. Sylacauga

Lying along State Highway 231, Sylacauga is a gorgeous family-oriented town that rallies around Aggie athletics.

7. Dauphin Island

Just off the southern tip of Mobile County, Dauphin Island is an all natural beach where pets (and humans) are allowed to roam free.

6. Tuscumbia

Just south of the Tennesse River, this northwest Alabama city is known as the birthplace of Helen Keller and its growing family atmosphere. Neighboring cities Florence and Muscle Shoals combine with Tuscumbia to offer more restaurants and shopping at less than a half-hour drive.

5. Gulf Shores

As the most popular beach in the state, Gulf Shores' white sand and salty waves draw hundreds of thousands of tourists a year. Gulf Shores is home to the best food and the best atmosphere that Alabama has to offer.

4. Jacksonville

Home to the Jacksonville State University Gamecocks, Jacksonville serves as a hub between nearby metropolitan areas of Oxford/Anniston and Gadsden. This historic town continues its legacy as Gamecock academics and athletics keep Jacksonville at the center of national attention.

3. Silverhill

A beautiful town in Baldwin County, Silverhill rests in between Fairhope and Robertsdale, and is home to cute ice cream shops and clothing boutiques.

2. Mentone

Known for its landscape, scenery, and food, this small town in northeast Alabama sits atop Lookout Mountain close to the Georgia line.

1. Fairhope

Nestled along Mobile Bay, this gorgeous south Alabama city is known for its beautiful downtown, its awesome food, and its breathtaking scenery. Fairhope is a popular spot among locals for beachgoing, shopping, and night life.

From east to west and from north to south, the highways are studded with beautiful towns that are calling your name!

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30 Places Every Millennial Girl Needs To Travel To BEFORE She Turns 30

Live your best life, all around the world.
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I am a travel enthusiast. There is nowhere I do not want to go.

Traveling the world is one of my biggest goals in life and I am determined to make it happen. The world is so big and I would love to see every inch of it at some point or another.

However, if I can travel to these 30 places before I turn 30, I will feel as though I have accomplished more than enough.

1. New York City, New York

2. New Orleans, Louisiana

3. Grand Canyon, Arizona

4. Las Vegas, Nevada

5. San Francisco, California

6. Los Angeles, California

7. Nashville, Tennessee

8. Honolulu, Hawaii

9. Walt Disney World, Florida

10. Chicago, Illinois

11. Nassau, Bahamas

12. Cozumel, Mexico

13. Cancún, Mexico

14. Bridgetown, Barbados

15. Basseterre, St. Kitts

16. Philipsburg, St. Maarten

17. Montego Bay, Jamacia

18. Christiansted, St. Croix

19. Punta Cana, Dominican Republic

20. Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas

21. Tortola Baths, Tortola

22. San Juan, Puerto Rico

23. Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos

24. Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

25. Oranjestad, Aruba

26. Mykonos, Greece

27. London, England

28. Paris, France

29. Barcelona, Spain

30. Rome, Italy

Okay, so these are 30 places I want to go out of like, a million. I have traveled to some of these places and would not hesitate one second to go back.

Every new place is like a new adventure, and traveling will forever be so exciting and intruiging to me.

Cover Image Credit: Maisa Teat

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Friends Don’t Let Friends Be White Feminists

I am white. I am a feminist. But I try very hard to avoid being a "white feminist."

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Preamble 1: I'm not sure if you're aware, but it's a humid, grey April afternoon and being a woman comes with extra challenges, to which I definitely did not agree but they were probably in some fine print that I skimmed. Bummer. Anyway, feminism! Feminism's place in 2019 is contested but I am coming from a place of having heard many of the sides, given that, it would be lovely if you would hear my side.

Preamble 2: Before I get into this topic, I want to acknowledge the place of privilege from which I come. Look at my fully Irish name, I am white. Believing in social, economic, and political gender equality, I am a feminist. But I try very hard to avoid being a "white feminist." As a student at Texas A&M;, a university that sometimes strays into homogeneity in both thought and demographic, I've been noticing a pattern in many conversations concerning gender equality. The pattern is that of white feminism.

White feminism is a Western-styled picking and choosing of feminism that entails a set of beliefs tolerating the ignorance of issues that mostly impact women of color.

Contrast this philosophy with intersectional feminism, which recognizes multiple identities and experiences within us, while promoting more united gender equality. Without intersectionality, our essence cannot stand against oppression and stand for equality without acknowledgment of the nuances of different historical struggles. As women, we face difficulties, but not all women face the same oppression and marginalizations – and that cannot be overlooked in narratives.

As far as gendered-based violence goes, the Justice Department estimates that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 71 men will experience rape in the US. However, here's where the necessary nuances come in.

Women and men of color are more likely to experience this form of violence than white women or men. Women and men who are LGBTQ+ are more likely to experience this form of violence than straight women or men. Lower-income women and men are more likely to experience this form of violence than women or men in the highest income brackets.

So, yes, 1 in 5 women and 1 in 71 men are rape victims. But quoting that statistic without disambiguating the data can mislead readers or listeners of the ways that different identities amalgamate into this final number. Essentially, disproportional oppressions exist. All women are at risk for gendered violence, specifically rape, in America, but some are more at risk.

If you need more of an explanation, think of the following analogy. White feminism is to intersectional feminism what #AllLivesMatter is to #BlackLivesMatter. Everyday Feminism contends, "the former's attempt at inclusiveness can actually erase the latter's acknowledgment of a unique issue that disproportionately affects a specific group of people."

If you ever find yourself guilty of white feminism, (I've been there!) know that we are all evolving. As long as you are open to education, we are all on the same side.

Here are three vital steps you can take to make your feminism intersectional!

1. Reflect on yourself. 

Reflect on your long-held beliefs based on your perspective alone could not apply to someone else. Reflect on your privileged experiences and acknowledge them for what they are.

2. Think about others. 

Once you've figured your internal state out from step one, you ought to look at the experiences of others with the same level of validity as your own. Ethically, feminism focuses on equality. Yes, that means stopping sexism, but it also expands to mean stopping complicated systemic oppressions that affect more than just white women. That said, white feminists are not the enemy in the fight for equality, rather, they are underinformed.

3. Don’t be afraid to grow. 

Say you were wrong. There's less shame in it than you think. In fact, I genuinely wish our culture was more forgiving of people who made an honest mistake in their past, but their hearts were/are in the right place.

Allow yourself to move onwards and upwards. We are all works in progress. We are all striving for better versions of ourselves. Intention is everything and your intention should be to always learn.

Intersectional feminism is challenging, like all educations. If you're doing it right, it should force you to think and even make you feel a little bit uncomfortable.

After all, while feminism is here to help, it is not here for your (or my) comfort.

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